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Wet Felting! Needle Felting! Hat On A Ball!

Wet Felted Hat with Flower

Wet Felted Hat with a felt flower.
Wet Felted Hat with a felt flower. | Source

GREAT STUFF Big Gap Filler 12 oz Insulating Foam Sealant

Needle Felting! Wet Felting! Hat on a Ball!

In this Tutorial I incorporated three simple methods to make the felting process easier for beginners.

These are Needle Felting, Wet Felting and Hat on a Ball techniques.

Used together they can help speed up the whole process of felt making without compromising on the beauty of the finished product.

Rubbing and rolling the wool can be tedious at times so the use of a tumble dryer takes away the effort required to make felt.

The first step is to make a hat block using a plastic lined metal wastepaper bin and a spray can of Big Gap Insulating Foam Sealant. The foam expands rapidly and when dry it can even be cut or shaped with a sharp knife if necessary.

The complete hat last is not a thing of great beauty but I can attest to the fact that it functions perfectly and is still working very well even after many hours of use!

A Word of Warning!

This product it is highly flammable, remember to use it outside and never near an open flame. Shut off all pilot lights and sources of ignition.

Contains isocyanate which is extremely sticky and difficult to remove: Do not breathe fumes or get on skin.

Spray contents carefully. Use in well-ventilated areas, cover all skin and wear gloves, safety glasses or goggles and protective clothing

Things you will need

  • 1 Handcrafted Hat Block which can be made using Big GAP Filler Insulating Foam Sealant sprayed into a Metal Waste Paper Basket and shaped to the desired shape and size.
  • Metal Waste Paper Basket
  • Cling Wrap
  • Oven Spray
  • A Sharp Knife
  • A quantity of Merino Wool Roving
  • A Gertie Ball (I purchase these balls from Amazon) They are perfect for using in the Tumble Dryer. The have a soft and squishy texture with a nice surface for the fibers to cling onto. They also come with a little tube which allows for easy inflation and deflation. These balls can be used over and over again.
  • Hot Soapy Water (Dish Washing Liquid or Olive Oil Soap Grated in Hot Water
  • Wooden Handled Needle Felting Toil
  • Tights or Stockings


How to Make the Polystyrene Hat Block


  • Line a metal waste paper similar to the one shown below. I used some plastic sandwich wrap to line the sides and then sprayed it lightly with cooking spray.
  • Spray the foam into the basket until it is three-quarters full. The foam will continue to expand for a while after you have filled the basket. By the time it has fully expanded it should reach the top of the basket.
  • Leave it to stand in a well-ventilated area, preferably outside and under cover until it is completely dry.
  • Remove the polystyrene block from the basket and peel off the plastic.
  • The block can be shaped and carved to the desired shape with a long sharp carving knife if desired.

The Completed Polystyrene Foam Hat Block

Hand crafted hat block made in a metal waste paper basket using Big Gap Filler Insulating Foam Sealant
Hand crafted hat block made in a metal waste paper basket using Big Gap Filler Insulating Foam Sealant | Source

A Note on the Expanding Capabilities of This Foam

As can be seen in the image below, the foam expands far more than one might expect. In this case. it was useful as I was able to turn the hat block upside down and benefit from its ice-cream shape. In fact it made it easier as I had a good base to work with.

Ice-Cream Shaped Hat Block Upside Down

Hat block clearly showing that it was molded in a waste paper basket and then carved to form a cloche type hat block.  I found that by inserting it upside down in the waste paper basket it gives me a nice stand from which to work
Hat block clearly showing that it was molded in a waste paper basket and then carved to form a cloche type hat block. I found that by inserting it upside down in the waste paper basket it gives me a nice stand from which to work | Source

Start at the Lower Edge

Begin by adding slivers of wool roving to the lowest edge of the hat block.

Put down the Wool Roving

Starting at the bottom of the mold, working around and upwards
Starting at the bottom of the mold, working around and upwards | Source

Pull off a Long Strip of of Wool Roving

Wrap this piece of wool roving around the hat block and then fold the previously placed Fibres over the long piece to neaten the edge.

Add a Piece of Thin Roving with Which to Finish off the Edge Neatly

Inserting a thin cord of split roving to firm the bottom edge which I later covered with the down hanging fibers
Inserting a thin cord of split roving to firm the bottom edge which I later covered with the down hanging fibers | Source

Needle Felting the Wool Roving onto the Foam Block

Needle felting in the length of roving
Needle felting in the length of roving | Source

Add Layers of Wool to the Hat Block

Gradually adding the layers of merino wool
Gradually adding the layers of merino wool | Source

1st Layer Completed but Still to Be Needle Felted

Ready to be needle felted into position
Ready to be needle felted into position | Source

Cover the Roving and Firm the Edges

Folding up the fibers over the piece of roving
Folding up the fibers over the piece of roving | Source

Neaten and Firm the Edges

Neatening the edge
Neatening the edge | Source

Needle Felt the Loose Fibres onto the Hat Block

Adding the layers one by one and use whichever color pleases the eye.
Adding the layers one by one and use whichever color pleases the eye. | Source

Needle Felt the Fibres onto the Hat Block

Needle felting the fibres to the block
Needle felting the fibres to the block | Source

Layer 2, Work in the Design

Covering layer 1 completely with the design
Covering layer 1 completely with the design | Source

Enclose the Project in a Pair of Cut off Tights

Project inside a cut off [pair of tights.
Project inside a cut off [pair of tights. | Source

Pour Hot Soapy Water Over the Project

Pouring hot water over the project
Pouring hot water over the project | Source

Rub Fibres with Hot Soapy Water Using a Piece of Bubblewrap

Rubbing hot soapy fibres with a piece of bubblewrap
Rubbing hot soapy fibres with a piece of bubblewrap | Source

Checking That the Fibres Have Not Fused to the Tights

Checking to make sure that the fibers have not felted to the tights.
Checking to make sure that the fibers have not felted to the tights. | Source

A Note on Tumble Dryer Felting!

Once the Fibres are wet and slightly felted you can insert the whole project into a tumble dryer at this stage to complete the felting process. Watch it carefully so that the stocking does not become attached to the stocking. Don't leave it in too long as the Fibres can become attached to the felting block too where they were needle felted in.

Remove the Tights

Remove the Tights
Remove the Tights | Source

Tights Completely Removed

Tights removed
Tights removed | Source

Peel the Project off the Hat Block

As can be seen in the image below the felt can sometimes attach itself to the hat block especially if it is needle felted in too securely.

The idea is not to felt the wool in so deep that you have to tug the wool away from the hat block.

Removing the Hat From the Block

Removing the project from the hat block
Removing the project from the hat block | Source

Hat Removed from the Hat Block

Source

Shaping the Hat

You have 3 choices here The hat can be shaped in 3 ways.

Wet the hat in very hot water and wring out and then shape the hat to fit by putting it back onto the same last or onto a different shape hat block or even a bowl or even your own head.

If it on the large side you can add folds and even turn up the edges up form a brim. Felt is very malleable and can be shaped and shrunk to whatever shape you desire.

Alternatively, you can Wet the Project and put a Gertie Ball into the cavity and tie it up into a pair of tights and shrink it down again in the tumble dryer so that it forms a skull type hat as is shown above.

Shaping the Hat with a Gertie Ball

Apologies for the poor image regretfully but one cannnot  go back!!
Apologies for the poor image regretfully but one cannnot go back!! | Source

Hint

The easiest way to put your project into the tights is to pull the tights over a chair and then push the felt covered ball into the cavity. Remove it and then tie knots in the tights.

I use this method when there is no available pair of hands to assist me.

Insert the Felt Covered Ball into the Stocking

Use the back of a chair in place of that extra pair of hands is there is not another pair available to help.
Use the back of a chair in place of that extra pair of hands is there is not another pair available to help. | Source

Ball in Hat Pushed Right up into the Stocking

Stocking covering the ball.Poor image again but it shows the project being totally immersed in the stocking.
Stocking covering the ball.Poor image again but it shows the project being totally immersed in the stocking. | Source

All Ready to Be Tied Up

Stocking covered project ready to be tied up before popping into the tumble dryer.
Stocking covered project ready to be tied up before popping into the tumble dryer. | Source

Ready for the Tumble Dryer

All tied up and ready for the tumble drier
All tied up and ready for the tumble drier | Source

Hat Showing Shrinkage with the Stocking Removed

After the stocking was removed and the hat felted in the tumble dryer
After the stocking was removed and the hat felted in the tumble dryer | Source

The Front View of the Completed Hat with a Simple Felt Flower and Hatband Cut from the Project

Completed hat along with matching felt flower and hat band.  Still a little wet from shaping.
Completed hat along with matching felt flower and hat band. Still a little wet from shaping. | Source

The Side View of the Dry Hat

Completed hat still wet but showing the side view with matching flower and hat band
Completed hat still wet but showing the side view with matching flower and hat band | Source

What Did I Learn from This Whole Process?

  • There were a few things I learned from my having combined these three processes. It may take longer to lay out the Fibres, but it can be done in your spare time!
  • It really does allow for a less haphazard design on the felt though sometimes the conventional way throws up a few nice surprises! The felting process done this way is really quick in the tumble dryer.
  • Though the tumble dryer makes short work of the felting process it may not be the most eco-friendly method but it sure saves your neck from all that rubbing and rolling!
  • It is possible to overwork the felt in a tumble dryer and it can sometimes leave you with a much denser felt.
  • It seems then that there really is no right or wrong way to make felt. It is such a forgiving process!
  • My best advice to you is to find a method which works for you.
  • How you get to your end result really does not really matter at all.
  • Experiment a lot and have lots of fun doing it!

The end result was a hat which fitted beautifully and I was well pleased with the result. I hope you will be too!

Wet Felting

Have you ever attended any Wet Felting Workshops

See results

Red Felted Hat

Red felted hat made with commercial polystyrene hat block
Red felted hat made with commercial polystyrene hat block | Source

A Project for the Children

My favorite felting video of all time. Make a hat on a Ball - a simple method for Children and Adults alike.

Make a Hat on a Ball

© 2013 Sally Gulbrandsen

More by this Author


Comments 7 comments

ComfortB profile image

ComfortB 3 years ago from Bonaire, GA, USA

Extraordinary work of art!

You gave a clear picture of how to 'create' a felt/wool hat. I love the story, the instruction, and the well sequenced images!

This definitely deserve a HOTD award (just saying)! I Enjoyed reading your hub, and will gladly share. Voted Up, useful, and beautiful!


faythef profile image

faythef 3 years ago from USA

Absolutely awesome.... voting up and everything else..


sallybea profile image

sallybea 3 years ago from Norfolk Author

Thank you so much, I enjoyed sharing it with you.


Natashalh profile image

Natashalh 3 years ago from Hawaii

Wow - what a great tutorial and beautiful results! I felted a hat once, but I knitted it and then put it in the washing machine on hot. Your hat looks way better. Pinning!


sallybea profile image

sallybea 3 years ago from Norfolk Author

Thank you so much Natashalh, so glad you enjoyed it. So glad you stopped by, perhaps you will feel inspired to start felting.


Georgina_writes profile image

Georgina_writes 3 years ago from Dartmoor

I really enjoyed this article (rating up and sharing etc). I've often thought of using needle felt in my landscape painting work, and your tutorial has given me so many ideas. Following you.


sallybea profile image

sallybea 3 years ago from Norfolk Author

Thank you so much. Felt is a wonderful medium to work with and once you acquire the basic skills the creative possibilities are endless. The internet is a wonderful resource for learning and sharing. Felting is one of those things which I have taught myself from others willing to share their ideas on the internet. So glad you enjoyed it and thank you for your follow. Best wishes, Sally

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