Patchwork Quilt Designs: Hexagons

Updated on January 30, 2017
JanTUB profile image

Quilter, author, tutor, columnist, Jan T Urquhart Baillie has been enthusing others with her passion for quilting for more than 30 years.

Margaret (student) shows the hexagon quilt she completed from the many hexagons made by her mother from family scrap fabrics.
Margaret (student) shows the hexagon quilt she completed from the many hexagons made by her mother from family scrap fabrics. | Source

My First Piece of Patchwork Was a Hexagon

My mother came to visit for a few days in 1983 and she showed me how to make a paper pieced hexagon. I was fascinated by the possibilities and made a few cushion covers with fancy edges around the hexagons.

I began to play around with these hexagons that I was tacking over papers to see what else I could make besides rosettes.

Unaware that you could buy isometric graph paper, which would have made designing faster, I continued to fiddle with designs using the hexagon patches.

Someone Once Asked Me

  • I am busy making my hexagon flowers — what do I do next?
  • Join them together?
  • With a plain colour between each flower?
  • How do I finish the edge?
  • With a half hexagon?
  • Or leave the edge uneven?
  • How do I attach a sashing or edging by machine?"

Many people have asked me those questions, so...

Source

Join Together Into A Quilt

The most popular methods of assembling hexagons into a quilt are to:

  • Join seven hexagon patches into a rosette, and then join the rosettes together, forming adjoining flowers. (Pictured right.)
  • Join the hexagon patches randomly (like Margaret did above) or in a colour gradation.

This article is not meant to be instructions on piecing these, but I have included a video in case you are unfamiliar with the English method of paper piecing.

Hexagons

Triangles and Diamonds

Source

Exploding Hexagons Into Triangles

A hexagon is based on a circle so it can't be turned into a traditional block for a quilt.

Looking at the graph paper diagram, you see that it is composed of six equilateral (60°) triangles.

These triangles form diamonds when two are joined. In the diagrams, I show how that works when designing.

You can join three diamonds into a baby block by having light medium and dark diamonds. The outside 'block' in Little Boxes is white, grey, and black. (Pictured below.)

Source
Straighten the edges with half hexagons
Straighten the edges with half hexagons | Source

Templates for Patches

Size, Number?

English paper piecing requires one paper template (often old letters in the past) for every patch on the quilt. I used to take out the ones from the middle to eke out my supply and reuse them as I worked outwards.

Hexagon templates are available online or you can search for instructions on how to draft them.

Templates for diamonds and triangles are drawn from the hexagon template you start with.

Half-hexagons for making straight edges are also drawn from the original sized template.

Hexagon Graph Paper

Source

What You Need to Start Designing

  • Hexagon graph paper or
  • Isometric Triangle graph paper, if want to do more than hexagons.
    There's a link below for free printable graph paper.
  • Felt tipped pens in several colours or colour pencils
  • Imagination

Design Possibilities

There are two main types of hexagon quilts:

  1. One patch designs
  2. More complex designs

Let's see what we can do!

One Patch Designs

Using Hexagons Only

Grandmother's Flower Garden rosettes
Grandmother's Flower Garden rosettes | Source
Garden Path Design
Garden Path Design | Source

Design 1

Rosettes

  1. Colour one hexagon, in the centre of your paper, yellow to represent the flower centre.
  2. Colour six hexagons around the yellow one. (Picture above, right.)
  3. Colour one of the next rosette petals adjacent to one of the first petals.
  4. Draw as many as you want, in different colours. (Diagram right.)

Once you have made some rosettes, you can use the colours of your fabrics on the graph paper.

Design 2

Grandmother's Flower Garden (or Garden Path)

A Very Traditional Design

In the past, the path was almost always mid to dark green. Nowadays, quilters often put a white path in, especially if they use pastel coloured fabrics for their flowers. A green path would overshadow the soft fabrics.

As before, start with a flower centre, build a rosette, then surround it with green hexagons. In the diagram, I left all the rosettes blank, so you could see the green path.

Medallion Design
Medallion Design | Source

Design 3

Medallions

You start in the centre and work outwards.

In my design I 'joined' four hexagons to form a diamond shape. Next, I coloured all the way around that shape, which emphasised the diamond. I added one more row around.

After that, I added the hexagons to each side of the centre diamond in order to alter the shape somewhat.

Start your design in the same way. Continue until satisfied.

Landscape or Picture Quilt Design
Landscape or Picture Quilt Design | Source

Design 4

Landscape or Picture Quilt

A Variation on Random Coloured Hexagons

Start with a photo of a simple landscape, or sketch one with not much detail.

Begin by colouring a patch of sky. Don't forget to put in some clouds!

Next, add some mountains below. Colour in the grass, a path and maybe some rocks.

Fun, isn't it?

More Complex Designs

Using hexagons, diamonds and triangles

Starry Path
Starry Path | Source

Design 1

Starry Path

The simplest of the designs with additional shaped patches, you join the rosettes with diamonds and triangles.

Make scrap rosettes (as shown in the diagram), or design on isometric graph paper, in order to plan colour placement. An example might be gradated colours moving across the quilt with black setting triangles and diamonds, which would make the rosettes glow. White triangles and diamonds would completely change the look of the design.s

Source

Design 2

Colour rosettes side by side on isometric graph paper and begin to colour the shapes between.

As you design, be mindful of whether your rosettes are light or dark, scrap or co-ordinated. The area behind them can either dominate or be background.

Another possibility is to make this the centre of a medallion quilt, adding rows of hexagons, or half hexagons, to surround the rectangular or square centre design.

Now you are a hexagon quilt designer!

Sixty Degree Triangle Designs

I became obsessed with the shapes derived from hexagons that I was playing with, especially the triangles and discovered a book based on these in 1986. It is long out of print, but that shape, born out of the humble hexagon tradition, became my specialty.

The other surprise was that you use rotary cutting and machine piecing to sew the designs. Much faster that English paper piecing!

I began to teach people all over the eastern states of Australia to design with them. From simple to complex, they all start with isometric graph paper.

What Kind of Flowers Grow In Your Garden, Grandma?
What Kind of Flowers Grow In Your Garden, Grandma?
O Holy Night
O Holy Night | Source
Inner Sanctum, based on Inner City, a traditional half hexagon design.
Inner Sanctum, based on Inner City, a traditional half hexagon design. | Source

Questions & Answers

    © 2017 Jan T Urquhart Baillie

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      • JanTUB profile imageAUTHOR

        Jan T Urquhart Baillie 

        20 months ago from Australia

        Hope you start today, RTalloni. Let's go!

        And Chitrangada, thanks for the nice comment.

      • RTalloni profile image

        RTalloni 

        20 months ago from the short journey

        I love the landscape quilt! Now you've made me want to stop everything and design one!

      • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

        Chitrangada Sharan 

        20 months ago from New Delhi, India

        Wonderful and very creative hub!

        I always believe in recycling things , such as fabric or other materials. Your suggestions are very useful in creating beautiful quilts. This is definitely on my to do list.

        Thanks for sharing this well written and beautifully illustrated hub!

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