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How to Make Wet Felted Gloves with Fingers

Updated on August 26, 2016
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Sally Gulbrandsen Feltmaker. Her tutorials & techniques are as individual as she is, unique, experimental and always interesting

Kitchen Glove with Wet Felted Gloves

Wet felted gloves lovingly handcrafted by Sallybea.
Wet felted gloves lovingly handcrafted by Sallybea. | Source

Steps

1. Fill kitchen gloves with polystyrene balls.
2. Wet the glove with hot soapy water.
3. Lay the rubber glove on its side and put down the merino wool fibers.
4. Cover the rubber glove with the Merino Roving.
5. Use hot soapy water to add layers.
6. Use bubble wrap, massaging, and the pinch test to fuse the fibers.
7. Alternate between hot and cold water to shrink the gloves to the proper size.
8. Microwave them if you need to resize or reshape them.

Requirements:

  • A quantity of Merino Wool Roving
  • 1 Pair of Large Long Household Gloves
  • A small quantity of Polystyrene Bean Bag Filling
  • 2 CD’s or DVD’s which are surplus to requirements
  • A Small Roll of Duct Tape
  • A Small quantity of Washing-up Liquid
  • A Small Piece of Curtain Netting (Preferably one which has a fine texture)

Non Essential Items:

  • A large Plastic Funnel
  • A large Knitting Needle
  • A Wooden Spoon
  • A large Bowl or Plastic Bag for containing the Polystyrene Balls

1. Fill kitchen gloves with polystyrene balls.

You Will Need Some Long, Large, Kitchen Gloves (Marigolds)

A pair of latex household gloves and a plastic Funnel, the latter is only useful if the polystyrene balls are able to fit through the entrance without becoming blocked.
A pair of latex household gloves and a plastic Funnel, the latter is only useful if the polystyrene balls are able to fit through the entrance without becoming blocked. | Source

Method

1. Fill the pair of Household Gloves with Polystyrene Balls. Push them right up into all the fingers and make sure that all the fingers are filled properly before you work up towards the top of the glove.
2. Fill them as high as you are able to go and then seal each glove with a DVD which you will find, fits perfectly into each glove. Fold the rubber edges over onto the DVD.
3. Top up the Polystyrene balls through the hole in the DVD until you cannot push any more in. Do this by spooning Polystyrene onto the top of the DVD and then using three fingers push and press the polystyrene balls towards the entrance of the DVD hole. Use one of the three fingers to push the balls down into the glove. Massage the balls right to the top of each finger and thumb.
4. Cover the hole with a piece of Duct tape, then tape over the whole printed area of the DVD. Trim the edges of the duct tape carefully.
5. NB I folded the duct tape over onto the glove as can be seen in the images. In retrospect, it would have been better to keep the tape only on the DVD. It takes patience to complete this job but your patience will be rewarded! The rubber gloves make a surprisingly successful Glove Last.

Update: Rice, Sand or Polystyrene Balls

Recently I found an online discussion about this tutorial where it was suggested that rice might be a better alternative to the polystyrene balls. I think this to be an excellent suggestion but not if a tumble dryer is utilized It is my belief that the gloves may split while they are spinning around in the dryer. Polystyrene foam and sand were experimented with, but neither proved to be very successful. The polystyrene balls worked very well once contained in the gloves.

Polystyrene Balls

Polystyrene Balls - Bean Bag Filling
Polystyrene Balls - Bean Bag Filling | Source

Something to Keep the Mess to a Minimum!

Image shows a Stainless Steel Bowl, Household Glove and  some Polystyrene Balls
Image shows a Stainless Steel Bowl, Household Glove and some Polystyrene Balls | Source

Hint

  • Use a large stainless steel bowl to effectively contain the Polystyrene Balls to one area of the room.
  • The funnel I used was not terribly effective because the passage into the glove was not sufficiently wide enough to allow the Polystyrene Balls through without becoming blocked. It may be surplus to requirements, try spooning them in instead.
  • The hole in the DVD proved exceptionally useful as a means to fill the gloves.
  • Turn the top edges of the glove over onto the DVD as shown in the images. Make sure you fill the glove until you cannot fit one more polystyrene ball through the hole.
  • Compress the filling as much as you can by massaging the Polystyrene Balls up towards the fingers.
  • Try using the handle of a wooden spoon or something similar to push the Polystyrene Balls up into the area of the fingers.

The Polystyrene Filled Latex Gloves

Both gloves filled through the DVD hole and then covered with a strip of duct tape, after which the whole of the DVD was taped over.
Both gloves filled through the DVD hole and then covered with a strip of duct tape, after which the whole of the DVD was taped over. | Source

Polystyrene Bean Bag Filling

  • Have a little patience; your efforts will soon be rewarded. It takes a while to fill the gloves properly.
  • The end result is a very malleable glove last. It is surprisingly robust and easy to work with. Even the fingers can be pressed aside when you need to work on the one next to it.
  • The little polystyrene balls inside the gloves seem to help speed up the felting process. They appear to do this in much the same way as using bubble-wrap does when friction is applied to it.

Death of a Salesman DVD!

Both Gloves filled with Polystyrene Balls.  The center hole of the Death of a Salesman has as yet been taped up.
Both Gloves filled with Polystyrene Balls. The center hole of the Death of a Salesman has as yet been taped up. | Source

Just a Little Humor

The Death of a Salesman DVD came free with a Sunday Newspaper. Please don't feel obligated to go out and buy this DVD or even a Catherine Cookson one for the other. You need not feel that you have to replicate exactly the image above.

I promise you that any DVD or CD will suffice for this project, The title is unimportant for the success of this project.

The Rubber Kitchen Gloves Filled with Polystyrene Balls

The DVD's made a very effective stand for the gloves.
The DVD's made a very effective stand for the gloves. | Source

2. Wet the glove with hot soapy water.

The Essentials: Merino Wool Roving and Hot Soapy Water

Wool roving, hot soapy water in a squeeze bottle and the two 'hand ' lasts.
Wool roving, hot soapy water in a squeeze bottle and the two 'hand ' lasts. | Source

Wet the Glove with Hot Soapy Water

Wetting the last with hot soapy water using a squeeze bottle
Wetting the last with hot soapy water using a squeeze bottle | Source

Fill the Squeeze Bottle with Hot Soapy Water

  • Use the squeeze bottle to wet the glove with hot soapy water. This will help the wool fibers to stick to the rubber glove. You will only need to wet the area you are working on at the time.

Getting Started with the Wool Roving

Adding merino wool fibers to the rubber glove
Adding merino wool fibers to the rubber glove | Source

3. Lay the rubber glove on its side and put down the merino wool fibers.

Laying the glove down flat helps prevent the fibers from falling off the Last
Laying the glove down flat helps prevent the fibers from falling off the Last | Source

Putting down the Merino Wool Fibers

Lay the wool fibers down in one direction.
Lay the wool fibers down in one direction. | Source

Cover with Curtain Netting

Cover with curtain netting and then wet and smooth down until the fibers are wet through but not saturated with excess water.
Cover with curtain netting and then wet and smooth down until the fibers are wet through but not saturated with excess water. | Source

Curtain Netting

  • The type of curtain netting you use should preferably be finer than the one shown here. When you use a thicker net the fibers have more opportunity to become embedded in the netting.
  • You don't want this to happen!

Remove the Netting

  • Remove the netting and smooth out any loose fibers with your fingers. Work around the rubber glove in the same manner as before. You may find it easy to use your bare hands rather than the netting. This is really a matter of preference as so much depends on how much experience you have with working with wool.
  • I do find it helpful, however, to use curtain netting. others may use bubble-wrap or just use their bare hands to damp down the wool fibers.

One Half Has Now Been Completed!

Now for the fingers!
Now for the fingers! | Source

4. Cover the rubber glove with the Merino Roving.

Work your way around the whole of the Last and then complete the fingers.
Work your way around the whole of the Last and then complete the fingers. | Source

Parting the Fingers!

Part the fingers and add the fibers evenly to the whole area.
Part the fingers and add the fibers evenly to the whole area. | Source

Working on the Fingers

  • The fingers can easily be parted as shown above. This makes it very easy to put the fibers down. Don't leave any gaps in the wool, otherwise you will end up with holes between the fingers.
  • You might like to try using a knitting needle to push down the fibers between the fingers. I stopped using mine when I realized how easy it was to part the fingers and just work between them.
  • I always say, do it the way which works for you.

A Squeeze of Hot Soapy Water!

A drop of water holds the fibers on the tip of rubber fingers.
A drop of water holds the fibers on the tip of rubber fingers. | Source

One Rubber Glove Covered

The first hand has now been covered in wool roving
The first hand has now been covered in wool roving | Source

5. Use hot soapy water to add layers.

A Little Drop of Hot Soapy Water

  • Place a little wool roving on top of each finger.
  • Do this, one finger at a time. The wool will stay there while you smooth the rest of the fibers down.
  • Now add a little more wool and water to the sides of the fingers. Gently smooth the Roving until each rubber finger is completely covered. Ensure that the whole of the fingers and thumbs are evenly covered. Add more wool if you see any of the rubber Glove showing through. Making the area between the fingers too thick will result in limited movement when you wear your gloves. Getting the balance right will come with experience but ensure that you leave no thin spots.
  • Then repeat for the second layer.

2nd Layer

Repeat the first layer once more but lay the wool at 90 degrees to the first one.
Repeat the first layer once more but lay the wool at 90 degrees to the first one. | Source

2 Layers or 3

  • If you find that 2 Layer feel too thin, I suggest that you add another layer - or a decorative layer to the final layer.
  • I used two layers and used no decorative layer. I cannot stress the importance of getting your layers even all over if you want to end up with a good result.
  • Don't make your layers too thick. You could end up with gloves which will not allow your hands to move comfortably in them.

6. Use bubble wrap, massaging, and the pinch test to fuse the fibers.

Cover with Bubble-wrap

Cover with bubble-wrap
Cover with bubble-wrap | Source

Bubble side down

  • Cover with Bubble-wrap with the bubble side down. Add a little soapy water to the surface of the bubble-wrap. It helps your fingers to glide more easily over it.
  • Now start creating friction by rubbing the bubble-wrap firmly all over. Rub one section at a time. Rub until the fibers no longer move. Perform a Pinch Test to make sure that they don't.

Bubble-Wrap

Cover fingers with bubble-wrap and push down between the fingers.  Rub with your fingers for several minutes.
Cover fingers with bubble-wrap and push down between the fingers. Rub with your fingers for several minutes. | Source

The Fingers

  • Place the bubble-wrap over the fingers as shown in the image above. Rub vigorously for a while. Pay special attention to this area.

Massaging the Glove

Give the hand a good massage.  Don't be afraid to do this firmly.  You will soon start to feel the fibers tighten under your fingers.
Give the hand a good massage. Don't be afraid to do this firmly. You will soon start to feel the fibers tighten under your fingers. | Source

A Pinch Test

Pinch the fibers gently to see if they move.
Pinch the fibers gently to see if they move. | Source

The Pinch Test

  • Pinch the fibers between your fingers to see if the fibers move, gently now!
  • If they do move, continue rubbing. Insufficient Fulling will result in your glove falling apart when you put them into the hot water.

Massaging

The fibers can clearly be seen here to have tightened.  Ready now for a hot and cold dunk in water!
The fibers can clearly be seen here to have tightened. Ready now for a hot and cold dunk in water! | Source

Give the Gloves a Final Massage

  • Massage with your fingers until you are completely satisfied that the fibers have fused together. If you look carefully at the image above you can clearly see that the fibers have fused together.

Fibers Fused Together

Fibers fused together.
Fibers fused together. | Source

The 2 Gloves Standing Side by Side

Gloves completely covered in fibers
Gloves completely covered in fibers | Source

7. Alternate between hot and cold water to shrink the gloves to the proper size.

Dunk the Gloves!

The rubber gloves are being dunked first in hot water and then in cold water.
The rubber gloves are being dunked first in hot water and then in cold water. | Source

First in Hot Water

  • Hold them under hot water for a little while.

Hot Water

Dunking in hot water.
Dunking in hot water. | Source

Then in Cold Water

  • Take the Rubber Gloves straight from the hot water and put into the cold water and hold them there for a short while.
  • Repeat the hot and cold water process three times.

Cold Water

Dunking in cold water
Dunking in cold water | Source

One for Hot and One for Cold Water

  • Two Stainless Steel Bowls were used in this Tutorial for demonstration purposes only. One could easily substitute a Kitchen Sink for the same purpose.

Two Stainless Steel Bowls

Two stainless steel bowls were used for demonstration purposes
Two stainless steel bowls were used for demonstration purposes | Source

Gently Ease the Gloves from the Rubber Gloves

  • Once you have completed the hot and cold cycle water cycle, gently ease the gloves from the Rubber Gloves. They will stretch a little, sufficient enough to allow you to remove the gloves with ease.

Removing the Gloves From the Latex Gloves

Removing the gloves from the latex gloves
Removing the gloves from the latex gloves | Source

Hint

  • The shape of the original rubber gloves does determine the shape of the glove. They may be slightly longer on the arms than you would like them to be. If so, trim the tops first, just to remove any uneven edges and then dip the cut edge into the warm water and massage the edge.
  • Take the gloves outside and hit the trimmed edge on a brick wall. Do this by holding the top half of the glove firmly with one hand and then flick it sharply against the wall. You will be able to see the fibers shrink before your eyes. Do this in any area where you wish to shrink the fibers.

Time to Get a Little Rough

  • Once the gloves have been removed from the Lasts, rinsed in hot and then cold water, squeeze any excess water out gently and toss the gloves hard down onto the surface of the kitchen counter or sink. The gloves will begin to firm up very quickly and you can then begin shaping them.
  • I inserted my own hand into the glove to gently stretch it into the shape of my own hand. If they feel too large, continue throwing them down onto the counter until they have shrunk to the right size.

How Much Did the Gloves Really Shrink?

A comparison showing the original Last and the Felted Glove together.
A comparison showing the original Last and the Felted Glove together. | Source

This Wet Felting Tutorial

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Shrinkage

  • In the image above we are able to see how much shrinkage actually took place.
  • I purchased a Household glove which was one size too large for me. I did trim the upper edge of the finished glove slightly which makes it shorter than the original rubber gloves. The wool does shrink in both directions so it would have shrunk a little there too. However, the gloves still fit me perfectly.
  • Try using a medium glove for small hands and large size for medium hands. An extra large pair can be used for large hands. Remember to buy them long if you want them to reach higher up the arm.

8. Microwave them if you need to resize or reshape them.

A Microwave Oven

  • Who would have thought that a microwave oven could be utilized for many felting Projects, including this one!
  • If you find that you have shrunk the gloves too much, wet them and again and put them onto a glass dish in the microwave, just for thirty seconds mind you, no longer! You don't want to burn the wool.
  • Heating the wool makes it possible for you to reshape and stretch the gloves again.
  • You just have to love felt - it is perhaps one of the most forgiving things I have ever worked with.

Creativity is Such a Beautiful Thing

  • Creativity often starts with a concept or an idea which seems to grow much like a seed. It is often accompanied with a sense of excitement and anticipation of the creation which you are about to create.
  • It was one such idea which led me to search for a way make Wet Felted Gloves which not only had fingers but thumbs too. Handcrafted wet felted gloves are generally made as mittens or fingerless gloves.
  • Use a long pair of 'Marigolds' to create these Wet Felted Gloves. Choose gloves which are several sizes larger than the gloves which you want to create and as long as possible as shrinkage will take place. This shrinkage will be in the region of 30%.

A Special Request from Me to You!

This Wet Felting experiment has proved to be very successful. I know that with a little experimentation, I will adapt it to suit a variety of projects I intend to make in the future. With this in mind, I have two special requests to make from you:

  • First, I ask you enjoy using my concept.
  • Second, I request, that should you in the future decide to reproduce this Tutorial in any form whatsoever, whether it be electronic, or written, I ask that you please ask for permission first before doing so. It not or at the very least, I request that you please place a link to this Tutorial when doing so.

Please remember the seed for this Tutorial was sown on these pages and this original concept is completely my own.

Thank you.

Sally Gubrandsen

Your Comments

I love hearing your comments and sharing your thoughts and suggestions. Please feel free to share your own experience of using this Tutorial with me.

Another 3D Felting Tutorial by Sallybea

© 2014 Sally Gulbrandsen

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    • sallybea profile image
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      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 months ago from Norfolk

      Amanda Broadhurst

      Thanks for the feedback Amanda. I hope you have some success with your gloves. You are right, those little polystyrene balls are quite something to deal with. I guess you could fill the gloves with almost anything you can think of, including plastic bags or something similar. Glad the slipper tutorial was of some help to you:)

    • profile image

      Amanda Broadhurst 2 months ago

      I have used your tutorials to make slippers which was very helpful. I am going to start a pair of gloves today. I hope they work out. I managed to get polystyrene balls everywhere!!! Will let you know how they turn out

    • profile image

      Larisa 6 months ago

      Thank you for for understanding.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 6 months ago from Norfolk

      Larisa

      The gloves have a very practical meaning. I still have them and they are definitely wearable items of clothing. We simply have different ways of achieving the end result. Great Tutorial thank you. I am a great fan of livemaster.ru. Thanks for sharing.

    • profile image

      Larisa 6 months ago

      I understand that for you felting is just an experiment wit no practical meaning, but if you want to make really wearable gloves, here`s for you: http://www.livemaster.ru/topic/1904291-valyaem-ton... - one of the many.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 6 months ago from Norfolk

      Larisa,

      There are many ways of making wet felted gloves and this is just another way. I love trying different ways to create felted items and of course, you can use the shape of your own hand to mold the gloves on and get perfect results. Thanks for taking the time to stop by to share your own knowledge and experience.

    • profile image

      Larisa 6 months ago

      There`s no need of marigolds. Gloves are felted on a resist.

    • sallybea profile image
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      Sally Gulbrandsen 9 months ago from Norfolk

      Usted es muy agradable María , gracias por tomarse el tiempo para comentar .

    • profile image

      Maria 9 months ago

      Te felicito por tus trabajos y la generosidad de tus explicaciones.Es todo muy util.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 11 months ago from Norfolk

      Hello Dawn,

      Remember to buy gloves which are larger than his hands to allow for shrinkage especially if you use the tumble dryer to help with the felting process. I would love to hear how you get on. I love receiving comments like yours and look forward to hearing how you get on.

      Have fun.

      Sally.

    • profile image

      Dawn 11 months ago

      Hi Sally,

      I can't wait to try these gloves for my future son-in law. At the ripe old age of 25 he is already getting chill pains in his hands. As a mechanical engineer on a ski field he has to complete work in vey low temperatures, including times out in the open weather.

      There are times when he needs to remove his leather gloves in order to do finer work on structures. I'm hoping that a felted pair of gloves will allow him to still undertake the finer work without taking them off and that this may alleviate further problems with his hands.

      I'll let you know how this goes. Your instructions seem very clear.

      Dawn

    • sallybea profile image
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      Sally Gulbrandsen 14 months ago from Norfolk

      You are very welcome. Thanks for taking the time to stop by to comment on this Tutorial. It is appreciated.

      Sally

    • profile image

      terry 14 months ago

      love the tutorial,thanks

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 15 months ago from Norfolk

      Hello Beth,

      This was perhaps one of the most interesting tasks I have undertaken. Making 3D Items can be a fascinating exercise and was an idea I had played around a lot with. I learned a few important things from doing this project. The first thing is that the gloves felted very really easily over the gloves. It may be because the gloves have ridges on the surface and act a little like bubble wrap from the inside. Rubbing the outside with a small piece of bubble wrap proved very successful. The second is that it really does not matter if you take your time with your felting projects. Don't stress if you can't complete a project in one day. I made these gloves over a period of two days felting a little bit at a time, first doing one layer and then returning to the second layer of wool the following day.

      The tumble dryer is one of my favorite wet felting tools, but I am not sure you need to utilize one in this case. I think pieces of stocking

      cut into finger bandages might work well if this is your chosen route though. I sometimes utilize freezer bags in the tumble dryer as well, the keep the wool warmer and wetter, for longer, but the color, especially if the fibers is white does won't get any nasty little brown fibers adhering to it from the stockings. I take the project out of the bag as soon as I can see the wool passes the pinch test and then let it spin around in the dryer without a covering after that..

      I do think the rubber glove 'lasts' will stand up to the punishment of the dryer but I don't think it is necessary in this case.

      Thank you so much for taking the time to comment, I can tell you are as enthusiastic as I am about felting and this in itself feels very much like a reward to me. Please visit my other tutorials on HubPages or on my website I think you will enjoy making multiple coin purses using balloons with a tumble dryer:)

      Best wishes,

      Sally.

    • profile image

      Beth 15 months ago

      Hello Sally

      What a glorious idea! I have been felting for a while & used many different things for resists - I saw a picture of your gloves on Pinterest & immediately thought of rubber gloves by the shape, so was thrilled when I eventually got to your tutorial - adding the weight in the comments was great as well, as it gives a good starting point! I have often thought I would have a go felting a pair of gloves, but saw the downfall of using a flat resist, so this is such a wonderful idea, thankyou. You mentioned using wheat as a "stuffing" & being no good in the dryer - too heavy I assume - have you tried finishing these gloves in the dryer? I would be interested in knowing how you did it - I guess if I was to try, I would be making sure they were held together, then wrapping in gladwrap (or similar plastic wrap) covering individual fingers, then fabric & tying them up. I have bookmarked your page & will explore your blog & this hub more. Thankyou, thankyou, thankyou for taking the time to educate

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 16 months ago from Norfolk

      DebraHargrove

      I appreciate your stopping by to comment. It is much appreciated.

      Thank you very much.

      Sally.

    • DebraHargrove profile image

      Debra Hargrove 16 months ago from North Carolina

      Wow what a very nice article. I truly enjoyed your format very creative and talented you are.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 19 months ago from Norfolk

      Hello Elizabeth,

      The total weight of both of the gloves together is 47 grams or 1 3/4 ounces. The dry finished weight never ceases to amaze me as there seems so little wool in it. I really should have included this info when I did this tutorial and I do appreciate your asking me this question as it reminds me of how useful this info can be when making felted items. I appreciate your visit and I do hope you enjoy making these gloves.

      Best wishes,

      Sally

    • profile image

      Elizabeth 19 months ago

      Thank you for such a clear tutorial. Would you mind putting your gloves on a kitchen scale? I would love to know how many grams of wool you used to make them. Thanks!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 19 months ago from Norfolk

      Joyce Brauer

      The gloves are pretty flexible, they fit like a glove:)

      I have many tutorials on HubPages, even one where I used a pair of socks and duct tape to make boots and slippers and yes, it definitely works. I have many innovative ideas for making various 3D felted items. on HubPages and also my own website. If you go to my Profile page you will find links to all the tutorials and my personal webpage.

      I think that a funnel which has a large entrance will work better than one which has a small opening. I cut my funnel to make a larger opening. A lot of static electricity is created when you work with the Polystyrene Balls and the balls can block the entrance very easily. Using your hands might work equally well especially if you hold the kitchen glove inside the bag of polystyrene balls and simply press the balls in with the end of a wooden spoon.

      I very much appreciated your taking the time to comment. It is often a case of two great minds which solves problems one encounters when felting.

      I wish you every success with your commercial arch supports, it sounds like an interesting project to tackle.

      Happy felting to you too.

      Best wishes,

      Sally.

    • Joyce Brauer profile image

      Joyce Brauer 19 months ago

      Hi Sally,

      Loved your tutorial. I will probably try it. How flexible are the finished gloves? Are the fingers comfortable to bend?

      I had an idea about the funnel...Have you ever used a canning funnel? The opening is about 1.5".

      I am going to make a foot last out of a pair of knee hi's and duct tape so I can make slippers. I made a duct tape husband dummy a few years ago when I needed to tailor a Reni costume for him. So I think it will work. Have you ever made a shoe last?

      I want to make felted slippers with commercial arch supports between the felt and a sewn on leather sole.

      Happy Felting,

      Joyce

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      Hello Pia Laihonaho,

      Glad you enjoyed this tutorial. I am always interested in how others felt their projects and I will definitely take a look at your dragon. Language is never a barrier, especially when one can view images of a project:) Thank you so much for taking the time to comment and I do hope that your gloves turn out well.

      Best wishes,

      Sally

    • profile image

      Pia Laihonaho 21 months ago

      Thank you for this great tutorial! I have felted different things with different styles but gloves never because this never came to my mind! So simple solution and yet so brilliant. I´m going to try this when have some time spare! If you are interested seeing my felted stuff go see my homepages , www.madeinnummila.fi . I´m affraid they are in finnish but there is lots of pics. There is a slide show about how I needlefelted a dragon for my niece. It can be found under "Projektit".

      Have a nice summer,

      Pia

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      Suzanne Day - I doubt you will have seen anything quite the same before because it is my concept. Wet felted gloves are generally made using a flat template and I doubt they would fit quite as well as these.

      I had a laugh out loud moment over your comment about the rainbow gloves! Thank goodness they will never have the opportunity to end up Regretsy.

      Thanks for the vote up, awesome and up. I appreciate your visit as always.

      Best wishes,

      Sally

    • Suzanne Day profile image

      Suzanne Day 3 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

      Wow, I've never seen this explained before! You make the method look easy and I couldn't figure out how felted gloves were made before reading this. I like your succinct photos and it is the perfect tutorial. Voted awesome and up! PS - I have this vision of trying rainbow coloured wet felted gloves...let's hope they don't end up on Regretsy since I'm new to wet felting ;)

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      Hello MsDora

      I appreciate your visit and your very kind comments as always. Thanks for the vote up.

      Hope you have a great day.

      Sally

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      Sally, thank you for sharing your creativity. You certainly have a way with felt. Voted Up!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      ChitrangadaSharan

      I appreciate your visit and I hope that it will be helpful to you and many other people who would like to make wet felted gloves with fingers and thumbs.

      Thank you for the vote up.

      Best wishes

      Sally

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      This is so very creative and such a well done hub!

      Never came across something like this before. Nice and helpful pictures with elaborate explanation.

      Thanks and voted up!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      married2medicine

      You are very welcome. I am delighted that you found your way to my Hub. Thanks for clicking on my ratings.

      Best wishes

      Sally

    • married2medicine profile image

      Funom Theophilus Makama 3 years ago from Europe

      This is beyond awesome. I had to click on all the ratings except "funny".. Keep the good work and thanks for the share

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      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      rudra007

      You are very welcome. I am glad you could stop by. I appreciate your comment.

      Thank you

      Sally

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      Veenoo 3 years ago from India

      This is awesome, just too good. Thanks for posting.

    • sallybea profile image
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      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      kidscrafts

      You are very welcome. I very much appreciate your visit and the kind comment.

      You have a great Sunday too.

      Thank you

      Sally

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      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      Very well explained and great step by step pictures! I would never thought of this! Thank you for sharing!

      Have a great Sunday!

    • sallybea profile image
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      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      snakeslane - That sounds very interesting. I have never used dog hair for felting and have no reason to think that it would not work well. In fact I have read of people doing this successfully. I have this vision of your old dog Dora looking down on you with watchful eyes as you turn her coat into a pair of gloves! I think she would approve.

      I think you would need about four ounces of wool for your gloves. I wanted to weigh the finished product for you but for some reason my digital scale has gone walkabout but will add the weight to the Hub if it turns up tomorrow.

      I would love to hear how you get on with you project.

      Best wishes

      Sally

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      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      Faith Reaper

      That was my concern when I published this hub - of course I would love to have someone produce a commercial version of my glove and we could share the profits! The stuff of dreams!

      Glad you enjoyed reading my Glove Tutorial.

      I hope you are having a lovely week-end.

      Sally

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      snakeslane 3 years ago from Canada

      Wow sallybea, this is amazing! Are the finished gloves comfortable and warm? Good for snowy, cold winter days? They look beautiful. I have a bag of washed wool roving that I saved from brushing my old dog Dora. (Husky/Shephard cross) very fine white wool. Been wondering what to do with that. I wonder how much is enough for the gloves?

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      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Wow, Sally, you are truly creative and may need to get a patent pending on this idea of yours here! I only know a Marigold as a flower too, just as billybuc did, but know we have been educated a bit. This is a production and I do not know if I could pull it off as you have done so well here, but your step-by-step instructions and photos are great!

      Up and more and sharing.

      Have a great weekend,

      Faith Reaper

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      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      Hi billybuc

      Fancy, I did not know that the word Marigold was not universal - I will have to remedy that for sure.

      I am glad you liked my special request. If you can't beat the thieves perhaps it is to at least have them on your side!

      You have a great week-end to Billy, I appreciate your visit as always.

      Sally

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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hi Sally!

      I have never heard the word "marigolds" used for gloves...here they are a flower, so I was a bit confused...how were you going to make felted gloves out of a flower? LOL

      You are so crafty and handy...I really liked your special request...please do not steal my article. :) So polite to thieves. :)

      Have a wonderful weekend my friend.

      bill

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      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      DDE

      It is always lovely to find you back on one of my pages.

      I very much appreciate your comment as always and I am glad you found the information useful, interest and beautiful! Thanks for the vote up too.

      I hope you are having a lovely week-end.

      Sally

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      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      How to make wet felted gloves with fingers and thumbs is another great creative idea from you. Great photos and you always know how to present the step by step procedure with a careful approach. An informative hub indeed. Voted up, useful interesting and beautiful.

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      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      FlourishAnyway -

      I very much appreciate your visit but more especially. I appreciate your great comment and your vote of confidence in my abilities.

      Thank you.

      Sally

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Hands down this is the most creative hub I have read in a month or more. You are extremely resourceful and inventive.

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