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How to Make a Wet Felted Bird Pod

Updated on May 11, 2016
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Sally Gulbrandsen Feltmaker. Her tutorials & techniques are as individual as she is, unique, experimental and always interesting

Wet Felted Bird Pod (I love my home)

The completed wet felted project.
The completed wet felted project. | Source

A little about this project

This felting project has been designed to utilize a few tools which will help to speed up the felting process. These include a tumble drier and a balloon.

Time needed to complete this project is estimated at around three hours and includes half an hour which was spent with the project spinning around inside a tumble dryer. I timed it from beginning to end but then I was taking all the photos too:)

The end result is a bird pod which will keep its shape perfectly. Felting by hand never produces a felt which is as firm as that done mechanically, at least, that has been my experience.


Items required for this project

  • A tumble dryer
  • A template made from plastic such as bubble wrap or similar. Laminate floor cushioning would work too.
  • A large dinner plate
  • A felt tip pen
  • Scissors
  • A quantity Merino Wool Roving suitable for felting in colors in your choice.
  • Grated olive oil soap or dishwashing liquid diluted in hot water.
  • A latex balloon or alternatively a Gertie Ball which can be inserted into the cavity of your pod.
  • Bubble-wrap.

Method

  1. Place the dinner plate onto a piece of bubble-wrap/laminate underfloor cushioning.
  2. Draw a circle around it with a felt tip pen. The plate should measures approximately 11 1/2 inches across.
  3. Add a handle to the drawing as shown in the image below and cut out the template leaving a space for the handle.
  4. Place the template onto a waterproof surface and put merino wool fibers down onto the first side of the template as shown below,
  5. Cover the layer of wool with curtain netting.
  6. Wet with hot soapy water and apply gentle downward pressure to the wet fibers with both your hands.
  7. Press the water down and out towards the edge of the template.
  8. Remove the curtain netting and turn the project over.
  9. Tuck in any loose ends.
  10. Repeat the same process with the pod handle section, turn any loose fibers in.
  11. Fill in the center of the template with fibers, this time the fibers should not extend beyond the edge of the template in order to avoid making uneven layers in the pod.
  12. Repeat this process three times on both side of the template and add a few decorative fibers to the final layer as desired.
  13. Cover with bubble-wrap, bubbles facing the project and then cover with a thick piece of plastic sheeting.
  14. Using a palm sander, sand the layers of felt until you can perform the 'pinch' test. This may take a while but do this as thoroughly as possible.
  15. Cut a very small hole into one side of the pod and be careful not to penetrate the layer underneath the template.
  16. Leaving the template inside, carefully insert a latex balloon into the cavity and inflate it, leave a little space (It will look a little baggy). This space will be taken up as the project begins to shrink in the tumble dryer and the air inside the balloon expands.
  17. Knot the end of the balloon and wrap strips of bubble-wrap around the handle of the pod.
  18. Insert the project into a freezer bag. Tie the ends, leaving a little space through which any excess water can escape and insert the pod into a tumble dryer.
  19. As the project shrinks, keep on checking the progress.
  20. As the fibers tighten up and the balloon takes up the slack in the pod, untie the balloon, let out a little air. Each time you do this, put it back into the plastic bag and place into the tumble dryer until further shrinkage has taken place.
  21. Do this three or more times or until you are satisfied that the pod will hold its shape when the balloon is removed.
  22. Remove the balloon and the template from the project and neaten the entrance to the pod as shown.
  23. Don't worry too much if a little bit of the resist template remains behind in the handle. It will give this area a little added strength and it won't be seen by the bird inside or anyone else.
  24. I like to rub the handle between my hands so that it becomes a little rounded. This will happen anyway in the tumble dryer but if not, give it a little help.
  25. Put the balloon back into the hole for the last time, rinse thoroughly under running water and then put the project back into the tumble dryer to dry a little and allow the pod to dry out on a hook or washing line with the balloon still inside.
  26. Your project is now complete.


A note on using a balloon for this project

The air inside a balloon will expand as the tumble dryer heats it.

For this reason allow a little more space than you might expect which will allow shrinkage to take place. The pod should be a little 'baggy' around the balloon when you first insert the balloon into the pod.

Step by Step Guide

Place a dinner plate which should measure a minimum of 11 1/2 inches onto a piece of laminate floor cushioning or bubble-wrap. Draw around the plate with a felt tip pen. Add a handle as shown in the image below and cut the template out.

In this case I used something which feels and looks like apple box packaging.

Draw and cut out a template

The dinner plate should measure a minimum of 11 1/2 inches across the middle
The dinner plate should measure a minimum of 11 1/2 inches across the middle | Source

A few of the items required for this project

The image shows a party balloon, a pair of scissors, the template and a felt tip pen, an old towel, bubble-wrap is used to cover the surface of the table. I use a marble table but any waterproof surface should suffice.

The sushi mat shown here will not be used for this project.

The template

Gertie ball, balloon, scissors, felt tip pen and the template which has been cut out.
Gertie ball, balloon, scissors, felt tip pen and the template which has been cut out. | Source

Merino wool roving and the resist template

Resist template and merino wool roving
Resist template and merino wool roving | Source

Add merino wool fibers to the template

Begin by adding merino wool fibers to the 1st side of the resist

Putting down the fibers

Lay the fibers down on the edge of the template
Lay the fibers down on the edge of the template | Source

Fill the center space with woolen fibers

Cover the resist with an even layer of fibers.

Make sure not to leave any gaps as this will result in thin spots. Aim to get all sides as even as is possible.

Side 1 covered in woolen fibers

Side 1 covered with woolen fibers
Side 1 covered with woolen fibers | Source

Cover with curtain netting

Cover the wool fibers with curtain netting, wet and smooth down the fibers with hot soapy water. Do this by pressing down onto the wool. Push the water out towards the edges of the template and then smooth them down with your fingers.

Cover with curtain netting and wet with hot soapy water

Wetting with hot soapy water
Wetting with hot soapy water | Source

Curtain netting

Gentry remove the curtain netting from the woolen fibers.

Image shows the wet fibers below

Removing the netting
Removing the netting | Source

Now turn the template over

The overhanging fibers on the edge should now be gently turned over.

Use your fingers and hot water to smooth them out.

The 2nd side facing the top

The 2nd side of the template facing the top.
The 2nd side of the template facing the top. | Source

Top section, the handle.

Begin by turning over the fibers in the top section near the handle.

Turn the fibers in and over the template edges

Turn the fibers over the edges of the template.
Turn the fibers over the edges of the template. | Source

The fibers folded over the template edges

Neatly fold over the woolen fibers to form a neat circle as shown.

For a really neat edge cover with bubble-wrap now and rub for a few seconds.

Folding the edges in

Folding the edges over the template
Folding the edges over the template | Source

Now begin the bird pod handle

Cover the template as shown with more woolen fibers.

Cover with curtain netting

Cover the beginnings of the handle with curtain netting, wet with hot soapy water and smooth down the fibers.

Remove the netting

Remove the curtain netting once the wet fibers have been smoothed down.

The wet fibers

Wet fibers, flattened and ready to be turned over.
Wet fibers, flattened and ready to be turned over. | Source

Turn the template over

Turn the template over and begin by folding in the edges to create a handle for the bird pod.

If you fibers are very long, don't worry, take them back around to the other side so that the edges are completely neatened off.

Turn the template over

Turn the template over
Turn the template over | Source

Turn one edge in

Begin by turning in one edge as shown in the image below.

Turn the first edge in

Turn the first edge in and over the template
Turn the first edge in and over the template | Source

Now neatly fold in both edges.

Turn in both edges of the handle, one over the other. If you fibers are shorter you may not have to do this.

Edges of the bird pod handle

Edges of the handle turn over neatly
Edges of the handle turn over neatly | Source

Now fill the center of the template with woolen fibers

Fill in the second side of the template with woolen fibers as shown and cover the project with the curtain netting and wet with hot soapy water.

The 2nd side covered in woolen fibers

The template is now covered in woolen fibers.
The template is now covered in woolen fibers. | Source

Cover with curtain netting

Wet with hot soapy water, smooth down the wool and press the water down and out towards the outer edges of the template. Rub gently with your hands.

Wetting the wool

Wetting the wool with hot soapy water
Wetting the wool with hot soapy water | Source

Neaten any edges which extend beyond the edge

Carefully turn any loose edges in to make a neat edge to the template by turning it over and neatening them off as before.

A few loose fibers

Turn in any loose edges to the other side.
Turn in any loose edges to the other side. | Source

Cover with bubble-wrap

Once neatened off, cover the project with a piece of bubble-wrap, bubble side down and wet the surface so that your hands can glide smoothly over the top. Give both sides a good rubbing.

Wetting the surface of the bubble wrap

Wetting the surface of the bubble wrap
Wetting the surface of the bubble wrap | Source

Rub the project well

With the project now covered in bubble-wrap, bubble side down, rub well. This will give the project a nice neat finish in preparation for layer 2.

Rubbing the surface of the bubble-wrap with your hands

Rub with your hands.
Rub with your hands. | Source

Remove the bubble-wrap

Layer 1 has now been completed. The result is a beautifully neat wool covered template.

This will now be repeated twice more. The final layer will also have the addition of a little decoration.

Removing the bubble-wrap

Remove the bubble-wrap to reveal a beautiful neat surface.
Remove the bubble-wrap to reveal a beautiful neat surface. | Source

Begin Layer 2 by covering it in wool fibers.

Start by covering the 1st side of layer 2 with a layer of merino wool fibers as shown below.

Side 1 of layer 2

Adding orange fibers to side 1 of layer 2
Adding orange fibers to side 1 of layer 2 | Source

Fill the center

Starting on the edges, overlap the template with a circular layer of fibers.

The wool fibers covering the center

Fill the circle with a layer of woolen fibers.
Fill the circle with a layer of woolen fibers. | Source

Gently cover with curtain netting

Cover the woolen fibers with the curtain netting, wet and smooth down as was done with Layer 1.

Wetting the fibers

Wet the fibers with hot soapy water
Wet the fibers with hot soapy water | Source

Wet with hot soapy water

Smooth out the fibers and remove the curtain netting

Removing the curtain netting as shown below

Remove the curtain netting
Remove the curtain netting | Source

Turn the project over to side 2 of layer 2

As seen below, the woolen fibers are ready to be turned over onto the previous layer of blue.

The project turned over

The fibers are ready to be turned over the edges of the template
The fibers are ready to be turned over the edges of the template | Source

Tuck in the loose fibers

Smooth the wool over the edges and wet down with your fingers and some hot soapy water.

Turn the fibers over the edge of the template

Fibers neatly turned in over the edges of the template
Fibers neatly turned in over the edges of the template | Source

Cover side to of layer 2 with wool fibers

Fill the hole with fibers as was done in layer 1.

Cover the cente hole with woolen fibers

Cover the center with woolen fibers.
Cover the center with woolen fibers. | Source

Cover with curtain netting and wet with hot soapy water

Wetting the wool with hot soapy water
Wetting the wool with hot soapy water | Source

Smoothed out the fibers

Smooth out the fibers as before
Smooth out the fibers as before | Source

Make the handle

Put a layer of fibers on the handle section

Cover the handle with woolen fibers

Cover the handle with woolen fibers
Cover the handle with woolen fibers | Source

Cover with curtain netting

Wet with hot soapy water and smooth out the fibers

Cover with curtain netting and wet with hot soapy water

Cover with a layer of curtain netting and then wet with hot soapy water.
Cover with a layer of curtain netting and then wet with hot soapy water. | Source

Smoothing down the fibers

Press down using your hands to flatten the fibers
Press down using your hands to flatten the fibers | Source

Gently remove the curtain netting

Lift off the curtain netting
Lift off the curtain netting | Source

Turn the project over

Turn the template over
Turn the template over | Source

Fold in the edges neatly as shown

Fold in the edges
Fold in the edges | Source

Don't let the wool overlap the second side of the template

Only the template should be covered in wool.

It is unnecessary to extend the wool over the edge on the second side of each layer. This will keep the layers even without making the edges too thick.

Cover the center as shown

Cover the center with a layer of fibers
Cover the center with a layer of fibers | Source

Fold in any loose fibers

Fold in any loose fibers, cover with netting and smooth down the wool
Fold in any loose fibers, cover with netting and smooth down the wool | Source

Cover with netting or bubble-wrap to smooth out the fibers

Cover with netting and smooth down the fibers
Cover with netting and smooth down the fibers | Source

Layer 2 complete

Layer 2 is now complete and is ready to receive the final layer of wool

Rub with bubble-wrap to achieve the perfect finish

Layer 2 has been rubbed underneath a layer of bubble-wrap
Layer 2 has been rubbed underneath a layer of bubble-wrap | Source

Layer 3

Cover the first side in a layer 3 in wool fibers.

If desired, add a few decorative fibers as shown below.

Cover, wet with hot soapy water, rub and turn the project over and tuck in the edges as was done in layer 1 and layer 2

Layer 3

Adding the final layer of fibers
Adding the final layer of fibers | Source

Cover with curtain netting

Wet with hot soapy water
Wet with hot soapy water | Source

Remove curtain netting

Curtain netting removed, wet woolen fibers
Curtain netting removed, wet woolen fibers | Source

Fold over the edges

Fold the fibers over the edges of the template
Fold the fibers over the edges of the template | Source

Fill in the final circle with no overlap

Place the fibers up to the edge of the template and not beyond.
Place the fibers up to the edge of the template and not beyond. | Source

Wool covered center

Center fibers
Center fibers | Source

A few decorative fibers

Last layer of fibers
Last layer of fibers | Source

Cover with curtain netting

Cover with curtain netting and wet with hot soapy water.

Flattened wet fibers

2nd side of layer 3
2nd side of layer 3 | Source

Turn in the loose edges

Turn in the loose edges
Turn in the loose edges | Source

Cover with bubble-wrap, rub for a perfect finish

After a final rub with bubble-wrap, making sure all the edges are neat
After a final rub with bubble-wrap, making sure all the edges are neat | Source

Cover with bubble-wrap

Cover with bubblewrap
Cover with bubblewrap | Source

Cover with a thick sheet of sheer plastic

Source

An electric palm sander

Use a palm sander for the final rub as an alternative to rubbing with bubble-wrap.

Please remember to abide with all safety regulations regarding working with electricity in close proximity to water.

Perform a pinch test

Performing the pinch test
Performing the pinch test | Source

Pinch test

When the fibers no longer move under your fingers the wool should be sufficiently fulled to complete the next section of this tutorial.

The hole should be just big enough to insert a balloon or ball. My preference is to use the balloon rather than the ball as I like to keep the hole as small as possible to start with. Take care, it will stretch.

Mark a tiny hole in the wet wool

Marking a tiny hold
Marking a tiny hold | Source

Insert a latex balloon into the cavity

Insert the latex balloon into the cavity of the balloon
Insert the latex balloon into the cavity of the balloon | Source

Inflate the balloon and knot the end.

Inflate the balloon, keep it flat on a table and bend down towards the project. Leave a little room for shrinkage as can see by the little folds in the wool.

The project is still fairly fragile at this stage but don't worry but do handle it with care. Further fulling will take place in the tumble dryer.

The inflated balloon inside the project

The balloon inside the bird pod
The balloon inside the bird pod | Source

Cut strips of bubble-wrap

Cut some long pieces of bubble wrap and tie them around the handle of the bird pod. This is done to prevent the handles from felting to the body of the pod.

This is done to ensure that the handle will not attach itself to the body of the pod. It ensures a 3D project.

Wrap bubble-wrap around the handle of the bird pod

Wrap strips of bubble-wrap around the handle of the bird pod
Wrap strips of bubble-wrap around the handle of the bird pod | Source

Place the project into a freezer bag

Put into a freezer bag.
Put into a freezer bag. | Source

Tumble dry for ten minutes and check the contents of the bag

Put into the tumble dryer and tumble for ten minutes.  Keep on checking its progress.
Put into the tumble dryer and tumble for ten minutes. Keep on checking its progress. | Source

Untie the balloon and release some air

This should be done about three times until the ball has shrunk considerably, around thirty percent.

Untie the balloon and release a little air

Release a little air and retie the knot
Release a little air and retie the knot | Source

As can be seen here, shrinkage has taken place and the air in the balloon has also heated. This causes the balloon to increase slightly in size. It is now time to untie the knot and decrease the amount of air in the balloon. Leave sufficient space for the wool to shrink back even more. Do this several times. Keep on checking the shrinking progress in the tumble dryer. This process should take about thirty minutes.

Remove the balloon and cut the hole neatly.

Neaten the hole and cut a perfectly round hole with a small pair of scissors.
Neaten the hole and cut a perfectly round hole with a small pair of scissors. | Source

Remove the template

Remove the template by gently easing it out through the hole.
Remove the template by gently easing it out through the hole. | Source

Remove the bubble-wrap

Remove the bubble-wrap
Remove the bubble-wrap | Source

Finishing off

Once the hole has been trimmed neatly, re-insert the balloon into the cavity and put back into the tumble dryer for a few minutes.

Rinse the project under hot and cold water and put back into the tumble dryer for a little while. Remove and allow to air dry with the balloon still inside.

A rinse in vinegar water is recommended.

Re-insert the balloon, inflate and allow the pod to dry

Re-insert the balloon and hand up outside to dry.
Re-insert the balloon and hand up outside to dry. | Source

I welcome any feedback.

I hope you enjoy making this project.

If you have any questions or queries, please feel free to ask. I look forward to hearing from you.

The completed bird pod

The completed bird pod
The completed bird pod | Source

I would like to hear your views on this project

Did you find this project helpful and easy to follow?

See results

© 2015 Sally Gulbrandsen

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    • sallybea profile image
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      Sally Gulbrandsen 6 months ago from Norfolk

      You are very welcome. Thanks for taking the time to stop by to comment.

      Sally

    • veefrowe 6 months ago

      This is fabulous. Thanks so much. Love to see what others are doing when creating felt pieces. Kind regards.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 10 months ago from Norfolk

      Cathy

      You are very welcome. I am so glad your project turned out well.

    • Cathy 10 months ago

      Thank you so much for the clear instructions ...I love my birdie house

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 16 months ago from Norfolk

      Glimmer Twin Fan

      Your return visit and very kind comments are appreciated. Always good to receive a HOTD. Thank you.

      Best wishes,

      Sally

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 16 months ago from Northeast Ohio

      Sally, you're so welcome my friend.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 16 months ago from Norfolk

      Kristen Howe

      Thank you so much for the visit and well wishes,

      Best wishes, Sally

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 16 months ago from Northeast Ohio

      Sally, what a cool crafty idea! What a great idea. Congrats on HOTD!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 16 months ago from Norfolk

      purl3agony

      Hi Donna, thank you so much for your valued support. It is much appreciated as always.

      Best wishes,

      Sally

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 16 months ago from Norfolk

      Heidi Thorne,

      You are so right. They definitely make a good talking point in a variety of situations. Thanks for your well wishes and congrats. They are much appreciated.

      Best wise

      Sally

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 16 months ago

      Coming back to say a hearty congratulations!!!!!! This is a terrific hub and project and well deserving of the HOTD award.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 16 months ago from Chicago Area

      How cute! Even if not used for birds, this could also be a cute holiday decoration. Big congrats on Hub of the Day! Well deserved.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 16 months ago from Norfolk

      srai

      Glad you found this tutorial useful.

      Sally

    • purl3agony profile image

      Donna 16 months ago from USA

      This is one of my favorite hubs! Congratulations on your HOTD!

    • srai 16 months ago

      Excellent!

      Yo make best use of writing and sharing idea.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      brakel2

      Hello Audrey,

      It may surprise you, but I began wet felting at around the time I started writing here:) I saw it as a way to combine my photography, wet felting and writing skills. I think it has worked out well for me.

      This is a good project to start with. I have made bird pods using several methods. Check out other my tutorials and see which one you think you might like to try first.

      A good beginner project is probably a very simple flower. I would try putting down a fine layer of wool roving onto a sushi mat. Wet it with a little hot soapy water it and roll the wool inside the mat. Keep on changing the direction in which you roll the wool inside. It will felt very quickly rolled a sushi mat. Expect to work much harder on larger projects though:) Give it a try.

      Blessings to you,

      Sally

      Sally

    • brakel2 profile image

      Audrey Selig 20 months ago from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

      Hi Sally You are becoming the great wet felter. I love this little bird pod and wondered how you got started with this craft about which I had never heard. It must have taken a long time to learn the steps to accomplish this feat. One day I just might try it. Pinning. Blessings, Audrey

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 20 months ago from Norfolk

      Glimmer Twin Fan,

      I have my bird pod sitting in a tree, just waiting for a little bird couple to decide to make it their home. I do think it looks very nice. I hope you get an opportunity to try this wet felting project sometime. Thanks for stopping by to comment, it is much appreciated.

      Have a great weekend.

      Sally

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 20 months ago

      Your projects continue to amaze me Sally. I can just imagine how lovely this would look in our yard. One day I will give this a try :-)

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      D.A.L

      How nice to hear from you. This hobby is a growing one and it is my hope there are many people out there enjoying learning this creative art form. Thanks so much for the visit, vote and share.

      Best wishes,

      Sally

    • D.A.L. profile image

      Dave 21 months ago from Lancashire north west England

      Hi sally,what time and effort you have put in to producing this excellent hub. I am sure there are some artistic people getting stuck into this fine project as I write. great read with easy to understand instructions and fine images. Voted up shared.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      RonElFran

      It was very nice of you to stop by. I am glad you found the process of making felt interesting. Your comment is valued and appreciated. Thank you.

      Sally

    • RonElFran profile image

      Ronald E. Franklin 21 months ago from Mechanicsburg, PA

      I'm not at all a crafts person, so I'll never actually do this project. But it was fascinating seeing how it's done. Just the words "balloon" and "felt" were enough to pique my curiosity, and I enjoyed reading about it. It certainly looks like a home birds will enjoy as well.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      Hi Jodah,

      I think that it is a lot easier than it looks. Follow the step by step instructions and cover the template as shown with a layer of fibers on both sides of the template.

      Repeat this, using a different color for the next two layers. This will help you keep on track so that you can see exactly what you have done on the previous layers.

      The most important thing in getting this project right is to make sure that the project is FULLED (with the sander or rubbed hard with your hands under the bubble-wrap, bubble side down) You can do it without the sander, it just takes a bit longer. If you FULL the project PROPERLY before you cut the hole and before you put it into the tumble dryer you will be fine. This is because the wool is very fragile at this stage and will only felt together once a lot of friction has been applied.

      I can't emphasize how important it is to make sure that the fibers no longer move under your fingers. Perform the (PINCH TEST) before you cut the hole and add the balloon before felting in the tumble dryer. Err on the safe side, more FRICTION is always better than insufficient BEFORE it goes into the tumble dryer.

      After that, the tumble dryer will do an amazing job. Cut the hole SMALL (MOST IMPORTANT) It will stretch, especially if it has not been FULLED sufficiently.

      This would be a great project to do together. The tumble dryer will happily accommodate two pods at a time:) Have fun.

      I appreciate your returning back to comment. Thanks too for the vote up.

      Sally

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 21 months ago from Queensland Australia

      Hi Sally, I read this great hub yesterday and tried to leave a comment but there was no box in which to leave a new comment..must have been a glitch. All good again now though. I love birdhouses and the like so enjoyed reading how to make a wet felted bird pod. Your instructions are clear and comprehensive with excellent photos along the way and video. I still think it is still too challenging for me but maybe if I can talk my wife into it...:) thanks for all the work you put into your hubs. Voted up.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      MsDora

      Lovely to see you again. I am glad you thought the finished produce look cute. I appreciate the very kind comment, thank you so much.

      Sally

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 21 months ago from The Caribbean

      Another great project with clear instructions and a cute finished product. In awe of your creativity!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      tillsontitan

      It worked out very well and you are right, with just a little patience and some care the bird pod is not difficult to make at all. This method proved very effective and I would use it in preference to other ways of felting if I wanted a firm textured result. The tumble dryer did a great job. I appreciate your stopping by to comment, thank you very much.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 21 months ago from New York

      What a great little bird pod! Evidently it takes a little patience, but your instructions and pictures, are so detailed it is definitely easy to follow. I love the looks of it and can see how nice it looks when it's finished.

      Voted up, useful, and interesting.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      FlourishAnyway

      How interesting that a squirrel would decide to live in a gourd. Squirrels have approached my bird pods in the past, sometimes ripping some of the wool off, perhaps to use to make their own little nest more comfortable. Maybe they appreciate their handy work more than they do mine. I don't really mind though as nature is part and parcel of my life and I am happy to share with any little creature that decides to share my space. Glad you found the instructions details and well documented.

      Your visit is valued and appreciated as always. Thank you.

      Sally

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 21 months ago from USA

      Lucky birds! I have a couple of gourds hanging out in my back yard for my birds, and a lonely little squirrel has decided that it would make a good home for him. Of course, he had to gnaw the entry hole larger. Heaven help him if he got a hold of this beauty. You've done such a lovely job with this, and the instructions are so detailed and well-documented.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      Hi DJ

      Oh you do make me smile. I so look forward to every one of your comments. I could bottled each one and sell them for a lot of money but sorry, not so sure about those husbands! I am afraid you will have to deal with those yourself:)

      Thanks for turning a dull evening into a smiling one.

      You have a great evening,

      Sally

    • DJ Anderson 21 months ago

      Sally, have you thought about centering your business

      around "dog houses for husbands". I mean, you could

      make them to fit the individual and they could be used

      repeatedly for the habitual offender. Just an enterprising

      idea!! You might snatch up the patient on this concept before someone else thinks of it. :-) LOL

      DJ.

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      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      poetryman6969

      :) We learn something new everyday. I appreciate your visit and the vote up, thank you very much.

      Sally

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 21 months ago

      I guess my first response is I didn't know you could make this out of that. Some very detailed instructions.

      Voted up.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      Hi Billy thanks for the visit. I will have you following those instructions at your earliest convenience then:) Your visit and vote, easy to follow is appreciated. You have a wonderful week Billy.

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      Bill Holland 21 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I voted it was easy to follow....for just about anyone not named me. LOL Great instructions, Sally. I love the idea of a craft project that benefits nature. Well done!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      DJ Anderson - thank you so much. Your comment, visit and vote up useful and share are much appreciated as always.

      Sally

    • sallybea profile image
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      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      purl3agony - they hold up pretty well to the weather. I think they are probably better as decorative items on a verandah which has a lot of interesting plants on it which compliment the plants and little birds that like a sheltered spot. I don't think I would use one two years running though I have had them in my garden for up to two years.

    • DJ Anderson 21 months ago

      Sally this is a super tutorial!!

      There is no stopping you. You go girl!!

      Voted up useful and share!!

      DJ.

    • purl3agony profile image

      Donna 21 months ago from USA

      Such an interesting process with an amazing result. These bird pods would look really interesting and colorful in the trees in our yard, but do you know how well they hold up over time? Is it possible to clean the pod out after a bird is done nesting in it?

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