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How to Make Wet Felted Slippers Using Duct Tape Shoe Lasts

Updated on December 2, 2016
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Sally Gulbrandsen Feltmaker: Her tutorials & techniques are as individual as she is — unique, experimental and always interesting.

Wet Felted Boots and Slippers

Wet felted boots
Wet felted boots | Source

How to Wet Felt Custom Made Boots and Slippers

Many people have difficulty in sourcing footwear which fits them perfectly. This tutorial has been designed to help them solve their problem.

I don't for one moment suggest that this is the quickest or the easiest method to create slippers. It is certainly possible to make wet felted footwear with templates made from bubble wrap, These can later be molded to the foot using a vintage or polystyrene shoe last.

In the example above you can clearly see that one foot is larger than the other. This pair of boots were custom made to fit the wearer whose one foot is permanently swollen due to a medical condition they have.

This tutorial makes it possible to create custom sized footwear which not only look attractive but also fit the wearer perfectly.

Duct Tape Shoe Lasts

Duct tape shoe lasts.  Please follow the link to the first part of this tutorial.
Duct tape shoe lasts. Please follow the link to the first part of this tutorial. | Source

Is One Foot Larger Than the Other One?

These boots were custom made. The wearer has one foot larger than the other.

Items That You Will Need to Complete This Tutorial

A pair of Duct Tape Lasts, Wool Roving and hot soapy water.
A pair of Duct Tape Lasts, Wool Roving and hot soapy water. | Source

Required Items

A quantity Merino Wool Roving suitable for Felting

A pair of Custom made Duct Tape Shoe Lasts:

A squeeze bottle for damping down the fibres

Washing up liquid dissolved in hot water

Bubble wrap

A pair of stockings which are surplus to requirements

http://sallybea.hubpages.com/hub/How-to-make-Duck-Tape-Shoe-Lasts-on-which-to-create-Wet-Felted-Slippers-or-Boots

Useful but are not essential - A tumble dryer


Duct Tape Shoe Lasts

Duct Tape Shoe Lasts made as per the tutorial in the first part of this two part tutorial.
Duct Tape Shoe Lasts made as per the tutorial in the first part of this two part tutorial. | Source

Apply Hot Soapy Water to a Small Section at a Time

Apply hot soapy water to the duct tape lasts
Apply hot soapy water to the duct tape lasts | Source

Method

  • Lay out a small quantity of wool slivers on a table surface. They should be thick enough to ensure that you cannot see through to the surface below
  • Damp down the surface in the area you would like to start out.
  • Gently lift the small bundle of fibers from the table and place them on the dampened section of each shoe last.
  • You may wish to place the fibers direct onto the last. If this is the case, wet the last in the area and start by placing the fibers down on the damp area.
  • Cover with fibers with a piece of curtain netting and wet the wool.with the squeeze bottle filled with hot soapy water and a small quantity of dish washing liquid.
  • Flatten the wool fibers beneath the netting using both hands. Gently smooth the fibers below and rub the surface of the curtain net gently, until you are able to lift it off without disturbing any of the fibers below
  • Continue onto the next area and repeat this process until you have completely covered the whole of the last.
  • Once the first layer has been completed, Add another layer in the colors of your choice. This layer should be placed down with the fibers running at 90 degrees to the first layer. This helps the fibers to felt together when you later begin to rub the last vigorously under bubble-wrap.
  • Try to keep your fibers even. Fill any gaps if you can see the Duct Shoe Last showing through.
  • This tutorial utilizes three layers - you may prefer to use four.
  • A white layer was deliberated used here to make it easier for the reader to see the different layers, but sometimes this is not always sensible as these may show through in the completed project. I would suggest that if you are first starting out with felting - try using colors which blend easily into one another, or use just one color.


Wet the Shoe Lasts

Hot soapy water helps the slivers of fiber to stick to the last. You need only wet the area where you intend working at the time.

Lay down a Few Even Layers of Merino Wool onto the Work Surface

Lay down sufficient fibers to cover a small area of the Last
Lay down sufficient fibers to cover a small area of the Last | Source

Lay down the Fibers

Pick up the small bundle of fibers from the surface and place them onto the wet area.

This step is optional. If you would prefer to lay your fibers direct onto the Last, this is perfectly acceptable.

Place the Fibers on a Damp Last

One layer of wool fiber placed on the Duck Tape Lasts
One layer of wool fiber placed on the Duck Tape Lasts | Source

Cover with Curtain Netting

Cover with curtain netting and wet with hot soapy water
Cover with curtain netting and wet with hot soapy water | Source

Curtain Netting

In this view a fairly thick piece of curtain netting. Use a finer texture one if you are a novice. It will make things easier.

Gently Flatten down the Fibers

Flatten the wool fibers under the curtain netting
Flatten the wool fibers under the curtain netting | Source

Press the Wet Fibers down Firmly

Wet the fibers through the curtain netting, press gently down at first and then press the water outwards. little more firmly. Once they are wet but not soaking, rub gently until you can easily remove the curtain netting from the fibers without disturbing them.

Remove the Netting Gently

Remove the curtain netting carefully
Remove the curtain netting carefully | Source

Tuck the Fibres In

As seen here, the fibres have been folded down over towards the sole of the foot

Fold the Loose Fibres over onto the Sole of the Foot

Image shows the damp fibers have flattened down over the sole of the foot.
Image shows the damp fibers have flattened down over the sole of the foot. | Source

2nd Layer, Left Foot

2nd Layer on the left foot
2nd Layer on the left foot | Source

A Second Layer

A second layer has been added to the first layer here. You may wish to continue working over the whole foot and then add another layer. This is a simply a matter of personal preference. Feel free to do what works best for you.

2nd Layer Right Foot

I placed my second layer on the right foot, placed down at 90 degrees to the first layer.
I placed my second layer on the right foot, placed down at 90 degrees to the first layer. | Source

Cover and Wet the Project with Hot Soapy Water

Wetting the fibers with hot soapy water.
Wetting the fibers with hot soapy water. | Source

2nd Layer with the Curtain Netting Removed

Second layer placed down on the first layer.
Second layer placed down on the first layer. | Source

The First 2 Layers Covered in White Wool Roving

Two layers of wool fibers on the Duct Tape Lasts.
Two layers of wool fibers on the Duct Tape Lasts. | Source

A Few Questions Answered Before We Move On!

Question: Should I complete one shoe at a time?

Answer: This is really a matter of personal preference. if you find it easier, do one layer at a time. The benefit of doing two at a time is that it helps one to replicate the design on both feet and get the thickness of the layers even at the same.

Question: Do I have to place the fibers down on a table and then lift them onto the surface of my last?

Answer: No, do what works best for you. The most important thing is that you should get your layers even. You may start out one way and then halfway through, adopt another method. This is no problem You may even want to start laying the fibers direct onto the last! There really is no hard and fast rule when it comes to felting - do what works best for you.

Question: Can I complete one layer over the whole Duct Tape Last before I begin the next layer?

Answer: Yes of course you can. It will make no difference to your finished project. The only thing that matters is that you keep your layers even through the project. There should be no thin spots left anywhere throughout the project. You don't want to end up with holes.

Question: Can I finish one layer and leave the project until the following day if I find myself in a position where I can't complete the project in one day?

Answer: Yes you can. I find that it makes no difference whatsoever to my finished project. The key thing is never to rub your wool so much between layers that the fibers are fused together before you start the next layer.

I deliberately left this project for two days before I completed the final layer. Spray the project with hot soapy water and smooth the fibers down before you start again. I did not as can be seen in the images, but I guarantee that wetting the project down will always make your progress much easier.

Add a Little Color to the Surface

Adding colored fibers to the toes.
Adding colored fibers to the toes. | Source

Start with the Toes!

The toes area is a good starting point.

Cover the Fibers with a Piece of Curtain Netting

Cover with curtain netting and wet the fibers below.
Cover with curtain netting and wet the fibers below. | Source

Wet with Hot Soapy Water

Wet with hot soapy water and then smooth down the fibres, rub a little and then remove the netting carefully.

Remove the Curtain Netting

Press and rub the netting and then remove it from the boots
Press and rub the netting and then remove it from the boots | Source

Gradually Move up the Foot

Start moving up the foot with the wool fibers.

Add the Next Layer of Wool Roving

Add layers of color as per your preference.
Add layers of color as per your preference. | Source

Add a Little Embelishment to the Top Surface.

Adding a touch of red
Adding a touch of red | Source

Cover with Curtain Netting

Cover and wet with hot soapy water
Cover and wet with hot soapy water | Source

Fold over Any Loose Fibres

Holding the curtain netting over the edges.
Holding the curtain netting over the edges. | Source

Folding the Loose Fibres Over

Use the curtain netting to help fold over any loose fibres and rub all the edges smooth.and then remove the netting.

Rub and Remove the Netting

Netting removed
Netting removed | Source

Continue up the Leg

Move up the foot and add more fibers and a top layer of decoration.
Move up the foot and add more fibers and a top layer of decoration. | Source

Cover with Curtain Netting and Wet with Hot Soapy Water

Cover with netting, wet down and rub.
Cover with netting, wet down and rub. | Source

Remove the Netting

Netting removed
Netting removed | Source

Continue Working up the Whole of the Leg Area

Add fibers right to the top of the Duct Tape Last
Add fibers right to the top of the Duct Tape Last | Source

Add a Little Surface Decoration

Add another color before continuing around the whole of the Duct Tape Last
Add another color before continuing around the whole of the Duct Tape Last | Source

Cover with Curtain Netting and Wet with Hot Soapy Water

Cover with netting, rub and continue around the foot and leg
Cover with netting, rub and continue around the foot and leg | Source

Work Around the Whole of the Leg Area

Fibers have been placed all around the leg.
Fibers have been placed all around the leg. | Source

Place Curtain Netting Around the Edge of the Foot

Place the netting around the edge of the foot, smooth them over to the foot and rub gently
Place the netting around the edge of the foot, smooth them over to the foot and rub gently | Source

Place Curtain Netting on the Edge of the Foot

Place the curtain netting around the edge of the foot and smooth all surfaces.

The Bottom of the Foot

The fibers on the edge of the foot have been turned down and smoothed out.
The fibers on the edge of the foot have been turned down and smoothed out. | Source

Time to Add Fibres to the Foot Area

Remove the netting and begin placing a dark color wool to the surface area of the foot.

A Side View.

A sideways view of the bottom of the foot
A sideways view of the bottom of the foot | Source

Foot Completely Covered with Merino Wool Fibers

Foot has been completely covered in wool fibers
Foot has been completely covered in wool fibers | Source

Cover Both Lasts with the Bubble Wrap

Cover the wool covered shoe lasts in bubblewrap, bubble side down.
Cover the wool covered shoe lasts in bubblewrap, bubble side down. | Source

Damp down the Bubblewrap and Rub Vigorously with Fingers and Palms

Rub the bubblewrap vigorously over the whole of the wool covered lasts.
Rub the bubblewrap vigorously over the whole of the wool covered lasts. | Source

Moving Away from the Conventional, Just a Little!

I am not a conventional felt maker. I do like to test the boundaries and I do like to try to invent the wheel! I don't mind using modern aids such as a tumble dryer and a microwave oven or even an Electric Sander. Here, I hasten to add, I always abide with good safety practices and so should you. It is so much better to be safe than sorry!

Rub the fibres on the lasts until they begun to feel a little firmer under your fingers and carefully encase both feet into one leg cut from a pair of tights.

Put the lasts into the tumble dryer, for about ten minutes to begin with. If the project is very wet when you put it in, it might take a little longer to felt properly. It is best to keep on checking the fibres regularly. If they become fused to the stocking, don't stress, they will easily pull away from later.


Cover Each Last with One Leg of a Pair of Tights.

Cover each leg with one leg of a cut off leg from a pair of tights
Cover each leg with one leg of a cut off leg from a pair of tights | Source

Feet Covered with the Tights

Both lasts have been covered and the tights knotted.
Both lasts have been covered and the tights knotted. | Source

Put the Project into the Tumble Dryer!

Place in the tumble Dryer for about ten minutes. Open the tights to check to see if the fibers have felted together. If not, put the Lasts back into the Dryer until the wool has felted.

Remove the Tights from the Lasts

Pull the tights off the felted wool.
Pull the tights off the felted wool. | Source

One Leg on and One Leg Off

One leg with the tights on and one having been removed from the last.
One leg with the tights on and one having been removed from the last. | Source

Tights Both Removed

Both tights have been removed from the lasts.
Both tights have been removed from the lasts. | Source

Rinse the Boots or Slippers

Still on the Lasts, Rinse the Boots with hot and cold water until the water runs clear of soap. Ease the boots gently from the Lasts.

Shape carefully and allow the boots to dry.

The Completed Slippers

The last have been removed  and the boot or slipper has now been completed.
The last have been removed and the boot or slipper has now been completed. | Source

This Project

Are you likely to try this project?

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Feedback

I welcome your feedback. I am always happy to answer any questions you may have. If you have any suggestions for future felting projects I welcome those too.

How to make a pair of Baby Booties

© 2014 Sally Gulbrandsen

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    • sallybea profile image
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      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 months ago from Norfolk

      Remember to be a little patient with yourself, it takes a time to perfect a pair of slippers, I just want you to have fun trying this out. Remember to check to out my other boot making tutorials using different methods.

    • mrpooper profile image

      mrpooper 2 months ago

      After reading this mny family will never buy boots again. very intriguing article and looks like fun

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 5 months ago from Norfolk

      That is wonderful to hear. Remember to err on the big side and I am sure you will have success. Remember that these lists can be used to make slippers using the template method as well. In fact, this method may work best of all. If you do decide to go that route, draw the template around the duct tape lasts and add several inches around all sides including the top. It is easy to shrink something down but not always so easy to stretch something if it shrinks too much! Practice makes perfect! I wish all the best with your project.

    • profile image

      JanJT 5 months ago

      Thank you very much for such a quick reply Sally. And thanks for the tutorials, it's very generous of you to share your knowledge so freely. I am now the proud owner of a pair of custom duct tape lasts which look very much like my feet (bunions an'all, haha!) Now for the actual slippers!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 5 months ago from Norfolk

      Definitely! I suggest using a large bamboo blind to roll the slippers or boots in. Keep on changing the direction in which you roll the project and roll until the fibres no longer move beneath your fingers. Alternatively, rub the project in between bubble wrap with the smooth side on the top. I have replied once to this query but for some reason, my reply is not showing. I hope you project works out well.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 5 months ago from Norfolk

      JanJT

      Definitely! I find that if you roll the boots inside a bamboo blind, bought from a thrift shop of car boot works this very well. Keep on changing the direction in which you place the boot to allow shrinkage from all directions. It is efficient and quick or you can put the boot between bubble wrap and rub until the fibres no longer move under your fingers.

    • profile image

      JanJT 5 months ago

      Is it possible to make the boots without a tumble dryer? I don't have one.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 7 months ago from Norfolk

      I would needle felt the boots when they come off the boot and before they are fully felted. Try putting a piece of dense foam inside the boot in the area which is to be needle felted and then shrink the boots after the design has been embellished onto the wool. Hope this helps.

    • profile image

      Meg 7 months ago

      I am wondering if you can needle felt on these after you have made the boot form with wet felting. Thanks!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 9 months ago from Norfolk

      Polly 

      I made these lasts sometime ago and since then have found that it is a lot easier to use the template method and then use lasts or your own feet to do the shaping on. I think the actual wellington boots will be less successful for actually felting on because of the heel and their inflexibility. Please see my master class boot tutorial where I use Wellington Boots to draw the shape of the boots. I think these were extremely successful and the finish is excellent.

    • profile image

      Polly 9 months ago

      Thank you for a great tutorial. This may be a silly question but I was wondering if you could use a gumboot as a foot last and felt over it instead of making your own. I realise the boot wouldnt fit quite as well and I would have to stuff it and seal the top with duct tape but do you think you could felt successfully over the rubber of the boot then pull the boot out?

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 10 months ago from Norfolk

      DrivefastDiepretty

      Yes definitely, I would trim the top of the boots and the wet the edges with hot soapy water and rub them hard using a piece of folded bubblewrap until they seal properly. You could also sew a blanket stitch around the edges or bind with a contrasting fabric. I made these early on in my felting career and I would also recommend a few of my other tutorials to see some alternate ways of making slippers which I have vastly improved over the years. Thank you for stopping by to comment.

    • profile image

      DrivefastDiepretty 10 months ago

      Amazing! They look great...and Thank you for sharing!! Have you any examples or ideas of finishing the top edges?

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 21 months ago from Norfolk

      LisaRae

      The slippers have a combined weight of 175 grams so estimate 200 grams, which should be sufficient depending on the size of the slippers or boots you are making.

      I would like to update this Tutorial or even repeat it with some info which I have gleaned along the way.

      If I were to do this again, I would put on a much thicker or longer pair of men’s socks, or even two pairs and then wrap my foot in cling film or a plastic bag and then put on a long pair of thinner men’s socks. By adding a bit more padding to the inside of the lasts, you should be much more likely to get the size of your slipper correct.

      You are only going to cut the top thin pair of socks leaving the other pair/pairs intact. The plastic film in between, should make it easier for you to cut the last off your foot.

      Unfortunately, felting is not an exact science. I am a bit of an experimental felt maker, always wanting to develop different or new ways of doing things. I hope that your project goes well:)

      Best wishes,

      Sally.

    • profile image

      LisaRae 21 months ago

      Hello, beautiful slippers and colour combination. Just wondering if you can recall approximately how much roving you used for these boot slippers. Thanks

    • profile image

      terry 21 months ago

      great explaination of making this,thanks so much.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 years ago from Norfolk

      Au fait

      Thank you for the visit and for taking the time to comment on this project.

    • Au fait profile image

      C E Clark 2 years ago from North Texas

      This project looks interesting too. Yes, it's probably best for first timers to try something smaller and simpler.

    • profile image

      GinnyK 2 years ago

      Thank you for the reply. Unfortunately she doesn't live near me. It's good to hear you don't have a problem getting the on and off.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 years ago from Norfolk

      GinnyK

      I can take mine off and on with ease though there is no reason why you could not add laces if you wanted to. You can also wet the slippers and stretch them on her feet while they are still wet and warm.

    • profile image

      GinnyK 2 years ago

      How easy is it for the person to take off these slippers? I made lasts for a granddaughter, but am concerned about her being able to get them on and off. Thank you!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 years ago from Norfolk

      I think you would be surprised to see how easy they really are. I appreciate your stopping by to comment.

    • Arachnea profile image

      Tanya Jones 2 years ago from Texas USA

      This would be fun to do. The shoe lasts would be a challenge, but I'm sure I can figure it out. Excellent hub.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 2 years ago from Norfolk

      Aisilinne

      To be perfectly honest I have only done this once as an experiment - also because I wanted to find a way of getting slippers to fit me perfectly.

      It would be preferable to sew or glue a pair of bought soles to the bottom of the slipper rather than the inside when the project is completed. It is unlikely that an inner sole would attach itself to the wool especially if it is made from a synthetic material.. Natural fibers always work best with wool - silk is particularly good for scarves - Nuno felting - thus making the finished item delicate yet strong.

      You could try using a canvass type fabric where the wool fibers will stay trapped in the holes. Think something like a cotton crochet doily!

      If would also suggest that you wear thick socks when you make you last to be sure that your wool does not shrink back too much during the felting process and make your slippers too small - meaning I would err on the larger size when you make your last. It will give you a much greater chance of succeeding if you want a really good fit in your end product. If you intend using them outside I would also make the wool thicker. If you look on pinterest you may find more ideas for working with soles and inner soles. I did see some on youTube and also e-Bay.

      Unfortunately felting is not an exact science - which is why it is can be such an interesting and exciting medium to with. Sometimes one has to experiment and try to find a way that works for us. I have attempted several smaller projects for children using similar methods - you may be able to incorporate some of these ideas with this tutorial.

      I would love to hear how you get on.

      Best wishes,

      Sally

    • profile image

      Aislinne 2 years ago

      In my giddiness at finding this tutorial I forgot to ask a couple questions. First. Can I start the sole with a pair of already felted insoles and just add the fiber over top of them?

      Second, do you have a video tutorial for this as well?

      Thanks again. :)

      Aislinne

    • profile image

      Aislinne 2 years ago

      Thank you!!!!!! I have been looking for a tutorial like this for months. I too have a medical condition in my feet and have spent the last four winters in a pair of sandals ( in snow country ) cause I can't find shoes that fit. Now I can make my own and at last have warm toes!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      calculus-geometry

      It really is amazing that one can create fabric from wool, a little soap, hot water and friction and no weaving or knitting takes place.

      I don't make a lot of items but I do sometimes sell them or give them away as gifts. I am sure that if I were not writing about felting I would do more. It can be a time consuming hobby.

      This all began when I realized that I could combine three hobbies of mine and earn a little money from them, namely, writing, felting and photography. It certainly pushes one to experiment with new and original ideas.

      Wet Felting really is an amazing art form which seems to evolve all the time. Writing about it has certainly been very rewarding.

      I very much appreciate your visit, thank you.

      Sally

    • profile image

      calculus-geometry 3 years ago

      It's amazing how the felt holds together with nothing but moisture and pressure. Very pretty too! Do you make a lot of wet felted garments and do you sell them?

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      Plynn - the Last was quite pliable as it was only stuffed with plastic bags.

      I first slipped the felt boot down as far as the ankle area. Push the leg of the last slightly forward as you do this and the felt should come off the foot fairly easily. I covered the area of the boot I was easing down with a tea towel. It helped me to grasp the wool without damaging the fabric of the felt boot.

      I guess you could pull out some of the stuffing out but I found this not to be necessary. I might add that the last also remained in sufficiently good repair to use again.

      I appreciate your visit and your very kind comments.

      Thank you

      Sally

    • Plynn profile image

      Plynn 3 years ago

      BOOT question. Wonderful tutorials and thanks for sharing with the world. Question: how did you get the fulled wool boot off the duct tape shoe last?

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      Faith Reaper

      I was unaware I had made the top 10 for the day with this Hub, actually I know it sounds crazy but I missed it when I checked the lists.

      Congrats on your own selection - I loved that Hub.

      Thank you so much.

      Have a terrific week-end

      Sally

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Congrats on the top 10 Hub Pot Challenge for this hub the other day! It certainly deserves it. I did not know where they were publishing the results until janshares just popped into my hub and told me that I was in the top ten today! LOL I was clueless, then I went back two days, and there you were for this wonderful hub.

      Blessings,

      Faith Reaper

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      FlourishAnyway

      You are very kind. I am glad you thought it right to include a few Q & As. I do believe that having some of these at ones fingertips before you begin a project, helps takes out some of the mystery or fear of failure one might have. I appreciate your confidence in my ability. Thank you,

      Sally

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      You definitely are the queen of your niche with these detailed instructions and your creativity. I like that you've included Q&As. Well done!

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      Faith Reaper

      Thanks for the vote of confidence, the share the much more. I appreciate your visit as always.

      Sall

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Wow, another creative hub here! You better hurry up and get a patent on all of your wonderful creations. These are one-of-a-kind no doubt! At least, I have never any like these before.

      Awesome hub!

      Up and more and sharing.

      Blessings,

      Faith Reaper

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      DDE

      Thank you very much. Thanks too for the vote up and the useful. I hope you have a great day

      Sally

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      You are amazing with such beautiful ideas and the creative suggestions are enormous from you. I admire your great talent in sharing such helpful hubs. I vote up, and useful.

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      Hello Billy.

      I guess one's feet though essential are perhaps not my greatest asset so on this occasion, think I might just keep them covered.

      You are such a loyal supporter - I appreciate your every visit - thank you Billy

      Have a great evening

      Sally

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My goodness you are creative. The only thing missing from this fine article is a picture of you wearing some of those slippers. :)

    • sallybea profile image
      Author

      Sally Gulbrandsen 3 years ago from Norfolk

      kidscrafts

      Yes, they are warm and cozy to wear. The thicker the layers, the warmer they will be. You could also stick on soles to take them outdoors with you - though I am still to get to this stage. Thanks for your visit and the comment - they are valued as always.

      Sally

    • kidscrafts profile image

      kidscrafts 3 years ago from Ottawa, Canada

      SallyBea, you really are on a roll with your felt projects! First the gloves and now the boots! Very well done and illustrated! Is it warm to wear like slippers at home?