DIY: Turning Onesies Into Shirts in 5 Easy Steps

Updated on November 4, 2013
Making onesies into shirts. It's quite simple.
Making onesies into shirts. It's quite simple.

Nowadays, it's tough to save money. Especially when you have growing children.

If you're like me and have to buy clothes every time your son hits a growth spurt, then you know that it can get tiring and very pricey. Onesies are great to have because they last a long time. Not to mention, they are soft and very stretchy. The only downside is that they don't grow with your children--or can they?

Keep reading to figure how you can turn your child's onesie into your child's shirt. It's simple, easy, and very cost efficient. It saves you money and you won't have to buy more clothes until the shirt becomes too small.

What You'll Need:

  • A flat surface (washing machine/dryer, ironing board, etc.)
  • Your child's (or your) favorite onesie(s)
  • Scissors
  • Stitch Witchery
  • An iron

Step 1:

Find a nice, flat surface and lay out your child's onesie. I prefer the washing machine because it gives me the firmness I need for ironing.

Any outgrown onesie will work.
Any outgrown onesie will work.

Step 2:

I can't cut in a straight line, so I use the seam of the onesie as a guideline to help me get that nice, straight edge. If the onesie doesn't have a seam to guide you, trying drawing a straight line with a marker or using the edge of a ruler to follow by.

Use the seam of the onesie to ensure a nice clean cut.
Use the seam of the onesie to ensure a nice clean cut.
The remaining piece can be used for another craft project. Have fun and be inventive!
The remaining piece can be used for another craft project. Have fun and be inventive!

After you're finished, your onesie should look like this. Use the leftover piece for arts and crafts or give them to your children for dress-up. My daughter uses the bottom piece as undies/diapers for her dolls.

Step 3:

If you are handy with the scissors and have created that perfect, smooth edge, then you can stop here. If you're like me and need to improve your edge a teensy bit, then turn the onesie inside out and fold along the edge where you just cut to get that perfect seam. If your folded seam is proving to be difficult, trying using something to fasten it. I prefer to use clothespins.

Clothespins are great for holding your seams while you approach the next step.
Clothespins are great for holding your seams while you approach the next step.
There other items you can use to create a hem or seam. This is the easiest method to me.
There other items you can use to create a hem or seam. This is the easiest method to me.

Step 4:

All you need now is an iron (set to the wool setting) and some Stitch Witchery. You can find this at any crafting store like Hancock's Fabrics, Hobby Lobby, Jo Ann's, etc. It's relatively inexpensive and will last you a long time.

You will need about two pieces per onesie (one for the front and for the back). Measure and cut two pieces of the Stitch Witchery so that it matches the length of the seam you have created.

Step 5:

Insert one piece into one side of the seam ensuring that none of the Stitch Witchery is exposed. Carefully apply your iron to the seam and hold firmly for about 10 to 15 seconds; making sure not to slide the iron.

Make sure that the Stitch Witchery has completely fused and then flip the onesie and repeat.

Ta-da! You now have a shirt!

It's just that simple and it has saved me loads of money! I hope this can work for you.

A onesie made into a shirt. Just 5 steps. Easy and cost efficient.
A onesie made into a shirt. Just 5 steps. Easy and cost efficient.

Questions & Answers

    I'd love to know how it worked out for you. Comment below to let me know!

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      • profile image

        Laura 

        8 months ago

        All patterns please, y soon is Supper long!

      • TabithaECleary profile imageAUTHOR

        Tabitha E Cleary 

        4 years ago from Montgomery, AL

        It all depends on the fabric. It does wear down after a few washes. If you want something more durable and sturdy, I would definitely recommend sewing it :) (It's been a while since I've used a sewing machine....so I take the easy way out lol).

      • S McNasby profile image

        S McNasby 

        4 years ago

        I love this idea! Did the Stitch Witchery hold up well after lots of washes, or would you recommend asking someone with a sewing machine to stitch a hem if the t-shirt is one that will get lots of wear?

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