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10 Things You Should Never Say to a Photographer

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Photographers Hate These Things

I wrote an article on Things You Should Never Say to an Artist and had a lot of fun with it. After a while I began to see the way it related to my photography as well so I decided it was time to write one for photographers. This list of don’ts may sound familiar to you because all creative have similar crosses to bear. This is by no means a complete list either. I can think of so many other things I have heard unthinking people say to my husband and me, but I wanted to keep the list short. If you think of other things that would fit, I’d love to hear them in the comments. So here it is: 10 things you don’t want to say to a photographer.

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1. Can I Have the Raw Footage?

This was asked of me many years ago when I was working with film cameras. I was a struggling artist and didn’t really have a lot of money to spend on developing the film. My friend asked me to photograph her wedding shower, as well as wedding announcement photos, which I was more than happy to do. She thought she was helping me out by offering to pay for developing the film by giving the undeveloped rolls to her. Okay, I was young and inexperienced back then and thought it was a great offer. I asked only that she let me have at look at the photos and have the negatives. I never saw them again. I took this as an oversight on her part, even though I asked for them several times. The announcement photo I saw in the paper and it came out nice. I sure wish I had a copy of it for my own portfolio.

That should have been a lesson to me but years later it happened again. I stupidly let several rolls of film out of my hands for a church event and never saw them again. Worse yet, my church friend spread the word that half my photos were unusable, they were so bad. I’m sure you know that photographers take tons of pictures in the hope that half a dozen or so will be stupendous. I didn’t expect the whole roll of film to be great; I don’t know why she did. This was finally a lesson learned for me. Never let the client see the raw film, footage or photos. You show them the good stuff and throw out the rest.

My husband is a videographer and he has the same problems. He is often asked for the raw, uncut footage from a video shoot. He doesn’t let that happen because he knows there are parts of the footage no one should see before he edits, crops, and corrects for lighting. It is like asking Shakespeare for his raw, unedited notes for his plays before publication…. Just won’t happen!

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2. I Want You to Do This Photo like the One I Saw on Pinterest!

We are artists, people. We don’t want to copy other people’s work. It’s sort of dishonest. Plus it says, “Basically, I don’t trust you to be clever or creative. So copy this thing from someone I thought WAS clever and creative.” What a slap — really? Why hire a photographer if you really don’t think they can do something clever with your family or wedding or whatever?

Do you think anyone can take wedding photos?

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3. Thanks Anyway, but We Got My Uncle Joe to Photograph/Videograph the Wedding/Event

This is something my husband and I hear all the time. A friend approaches us because they are planning a blessed event and then a month or so later, call back and cancel because Uncle Joe or Aunt Bertha owns a camera. It’s okay with us, sort of a slap, but okay. We understand you are trying to make nice with brand new family members. And you just couldn’t say no to Uncle Joe and his camera after he so graciously offered. But that shouldn’t stop you from having some NICE and PROFESSIONAL photos as well.

I spoke with a friend who had that very thing happen at her wedding. She said she was sorry they left the capturing of their special day to a family member. The photos were blurry and fuzzy and really poorly framed. Not to mention the fact that there was no post-production tweaking done. With a good photographer, you also get lighting correction and subtle clean up of extraneous hands or elbows in the way of the focal point: the happy couple. Not to mention the fact, that with a professional you get creativity and the benefit of years of experience with cameras and special events.

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4. You Aren’t Allowed to Be Here!

The place is swarming with folks all raising their camera phones to capture the moment but one photographer with a NICE camera shows up and is treated like the Paparazzi chasing Princess Di’s car. Half the time we are actually invited and yes, paid to be there, but we have to fight get a few good pictures around the self-confessed phone photographers. Some have gone so far as to say we aren’t allowed to photograph the actual wedding vows. Really? What do people think the couple wanted us to photograph?

I actually saw some video footage of a photographer taking pictures of a model on public land and was stopped by the park rangers because professional commercial photographers have to have a high priced permit to take photographs they are intending to sell. The problem is that if you have a nice camera and some lighting equipment, you are treated as if you are planning to sell or make a profit from the photos even if you are only taking the pictures for yourself. Ten feet away a whole group of people can be taking photos of their group and they are not stopped or asked for a permit. Apparently the size of the camera makes you look suspect.

Discrimination

5. Wow, You Have a Really Nice Camera — You Must Take Great Photos

The amount of time I have been working to hone my skills makes no difference apparently. It’s all about the camera? Listen, folks. The camera doesn’t take the pictures, I do. Anyone can buy a NICE camera. It doesn’t make them a photographer. The camera wouldn’t do so well in the hands of an orangutan and I could take some nice pictures with a very old, very small point-and-shoot if I had to. So there.

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6. Let’s Put the Baby in This Shoe

I love Anne Geddes as much as the next guy, but I really don’t want to steal her thunder by copying her work. Besides, it’s been a little overdone, don’t you think? The best baby photos are natural; mom and baby, mom and dad and baby, soft lighting and whatever comes naturally. I love to just see the baby and the mom together. Those are the best in my book.

7. Can You Make the Photo Black and White with Just This One Flower in Color?

Really? Of course I CAN do that. The question is will I do that. Everyone who first starts out in photography does that little trick and it’s okay at first. It’s all right now and then. But it can be overdone very easily. If you look through your pictures and they all look black and white with one little colored object, seek professional help. Please.

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8. Shoot This Photo on the Bias

Sometimes a crooked photo angle works but usually it looks like you took it just after “Happy Hour”. It is positively dizzying. If you want your audience to fall over, okay. Usually you don’t want to have the slanted photos of your friends and family. It is typically used as a photographic method to give the feeling of something off, or twisted, or haunted. Save the technique for that.

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9. I Want to Edit These and Put Them on Facebook

It is really messing with someone’s copyrighted material to do that. It isn’t far from rewriting Shakespeare and posting it as if it was your own. Don’t do it. Even if you think it is “advertising” for us, don’t do it. Besides, no matter what you do to the photo, after you have added light or color or anything else to a photo from a professional, we don’t want to claim it anymore. Don’t bother to mention where you got the photo. We would rather no one thought we gave the photos to you looking like that!

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10. Where Are the Pictures of You at This Event?

Sure, my husband and I never get into the pictures because we're TAKING them. Usually it’s okay with me because I prefer to be behind the camera. But as the years go by and my grandkids are beginning to go through photos of special events, it comes up that I’m in very few of them. It’s the photographer’s curse. What can I say? I was there, okay. The photos prove it.

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Finally

I love taking picture for myself and others. I will probably continue even if I’m treated like the Paparazzi from time to time. As an artist I do get a little testy about certain unthinking things people say, but I’ll get over it. If you can think of other things you should never say to a photographer, I’d love to hear about it.

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Photographic comments welcome 72 comments

MG Seltzer profile image

MG Seltzer 17 months ago from South Portland, Maine

My stepson is a photographer and I'm sending this link to him! He'll love it!


Kristen Howe profile image

Kristen Howe 17 months ago from Northeast Ohio

Denise, this was a combination of funny and interesting at the same time about photography. Thanks for sharing this hub. Voted up!


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 17 months ago from Oakley, CA

You know, there is one you probably don't hear so much anymore, in this new digital age. But I have a nice 35mm film setup with all the accoutrements..lenses, filters, etc. Invariably some clown would want to know what shutter speed I was using, or what F-stop. Really? It doesn't matter, unless you're using the exact same film speed and going for the same effects! And I hope for people to be creative enough to think up their own effects. I mean, with a sepia filter, I have to open up 2 more stops to compensate, for example, so what are folks thinking, anyway!?!?!

And while many families are not so lucky, my younger daughter is an excellent photographer, and did take the photos for my second wedding, and did a fine job of it; she's a professional-grade amateur. The only difference being that a pro gets paid. ;-)

Voted up, interesting and useful, shared and pinned.


claptona profile image

claptona 17 months ago from Earth

Interesting things NOT to say to a photographer.

Many times, the person stating the questions or statements has not idea of the skill involved in "creating" a picture.

Such are the hassles of the mode of the artist.

Paintings easy, right?

Just fill in the numbers.

Photography is simple, just point and shoot.

But, the eye that catches a good photo and the eye that catches a good photograph. It's wonderful when the meet!

Good hub, thanks for sharing.

Cheers


WiccanSage profile image

WiccanSage 17 months ago

LOL some things are funny to think about when you bring them up (you can't take pictures in public if you have a nice camera or flash? WTF?) but all very true and good to know. Thanks!


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 17 months ago from USA

It's amazing how everyone with an iPhone is now a self-proclaimed photographer. This was a good list.


justthemessenger profile image

justthemessenger 17 months ago from The Great Midwest

You could start a "10" series of articles about what not to ask. I am certainly an amateur photographer and reading this reminds me that God created flickr for hubbers like me. Like the pics.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

MG Seltzer,

Wow, thanks. That's quite an endorsement. I appreciate your visit.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Kristen Howe,

Well, personal experiences can be funny, interesting and annoying. Thanks for visiting.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

DzyMsLizzy,

You are lucky to have a professional-type amateur in the family so you can be IN some of the photos. Personally I think most people have just enough information to be clueless about F-stops, ISO and apertures. My sister had a "nice" camera a decade before I got one but she still asks me how I got certain photos without having the flash on. I try not to roll my eyes. Really. Thanks so much for the comment.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

claptona,

It's so true! It takes creativity and framing and focus and about a hundred other things people don't think about because the artist and photographer make it look effortless. I actually had a guy tell me that he thinks art (paintings) should be free for everyone. I so wanted to ask him what he thought the artist should EAT... air? But there you are. People don't think.

Thanks so much for commenting.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

WiccanSage,

I know, isn't that just insane? I keep a little point and shoot Lumix in my purse so when my big camera is suspect, I can still take out my little one and look like just another member of the public... as if I wasn't before. Mostly I take photos for myself and my art, and my articles. I rarely get actual gigs like weddings anymore. Isn't that sad? My husband gets more as a videographer doing testimony videos for the Rescue Mission. Thanks for visiting and giving me a chuckle.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

FlourishAnyway,

Well, it's understandable since those iPhones take very nice pictures now. Not like when the camera phones first came out. Still I like to have the highest resolution to play with and my big camera still beats the iPhone for that. It won't be long, though, that people with iPhones will be the ones the newspapers and magazines pay for on-the-spot photography instead of professional photographers. Wait and see.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

justthemessenger,

I hear you. There are some very nice photos on flickr too. The difference between professional and amateur most of the time is the pay. Thanks for visiting.

Blessings,

Denise


GusTheRedneck profile image

GusTheRedneck 17 months ago from USA

Hi Denise (PAINTDRIPS on HubPages) -

The thing I hate to hear when I am trying to make some photos is the stuff from the bossy rent-a-cop type at the shopping mall - "You cannot take pictures here." The last time that happened, I simply moved over to the public sidewalk and shot my pix from there. (Came out great, too.)

Gus :-)))


moonlake profile image

moonlake 17 months ago from America

Love your photos. I know what you mean about taking tons of pictures just to get a good one. I have been trying to get a great picture of the bluebirds in the yard, but so far no luck. I even bought mealworms for them and they wait for me to feed them, but the minute I try to get close enough to get a good picture they take off. I'm not the photographer you are and up until a few weeks ago I only used a little kodak camera. I enjoyed your hub voted up and will share.


agvulpes profile image

agvulpes 17 months ago from Australia

Great list and after taking photographs for nigh on 60 years I reckon I have come across every one of them!

Your list just reminded me of why I prefer to be a 'Nature Photographer' lol

One of my favorite comments from people: "Wow YOU actually took that photograph" :)


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 17 months ago from Houston, Texas

You made some good points here. Perhaps people reading this will take note of them. I am an amateur photographer and even as an amateur, I take loads of pictures looking for just the right ones. Practice makes perfect as the old saying goes...or at least it helps!


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 17 months ago from Oakley, CA

Don't even get me started on camera phones and the "selfie" craze.. UGH!

;-)


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

GusTheRedneck,

I know exactly what you are saying. My husband had the same problem with the mall cops. He was doing a video interview "Man on the Street" type of question and answer video but they made him stop. If all he wanted was stills, he probably could have managed from farther away. Thanks for your comments.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

moonlake,

I know what you are saying. Birds are very skittish and you just have to have a zoom lens for a good shot. My mom has a real love of hummingbirds and even though they hold still for a second or two, they can be pretty fast. The only way to get a good picture is with a zoom lens and putting the camera on a tripod. Hope you have fun trying.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

agvulpes,

I get the same comment when people see my paintings. "Wow, you actually painted that?" I always want to say something snarky like, "Wow, you actually asked that?" But I don't because I'm too nice. Thanks so much for commenting.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Peggy W,

It certainly does help. I "practice" all the time and don't always get the best photos, but I have also learned a few helpful things to do in Photoshop. Thanks for commenting,

Blessings,

Denise


MG Seltzer profile image

MG Seltzer 17 months ago from South Portland, Maine

I asked my stepson and he liked the fifth thing on the list, which was about people saying "you have a great camera, no wonder the photo is good." He said that was like saying "Great stove, that's why dinner was good."


Larry Rankin profile image

Larry Rankin 17 months ago from Oklahoma

Interesting to see things from the photographer's point of view.

Great hub!


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

MG Seltzer,

Perfect! Great answer! I'll have to remember that one for future reference. Thanks so much for the comment.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Larry Rankin,

Thanks so much, Larry. Nice to see your comment once again. Have a great day.

Blessings,

Denise


denise.w.anderson profile image

denise.w.anderson 17 months ago from Bismarck, North Dakota

I love it! People can be so cruel with their comments! I am a pianist and I remember someone saying to me, "I would give up years of my life to play like that." I deftly responded, "I already have!" Creativity doesn't just happen, it comes from years of practice and the photos you have shared here show that you have done what it takes to be called a professional!


MsDora profile image

MsDora 17 months ago from The Caribbean

Can't think of anything right now, but I know that people who do not have any knowledge of what you're doing will have some interesting questions and requests. Your article is very interesting.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

denise.w.anderson,

Awww, Denises are the nicest people in the world. lol. I agree people can be cruel and unthinking. I know I have blundered in and said something to that was less than kind. We all have our bad days, I guess. Thanks so much for the kuddos. I'm sure you are the best pianist worthy of the years you have spent to get there!

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

MsDora,

Thank you so much for your comment and your time. I always appreciate when you come read my work. It makes me feel loved and appreciated.

Blessings,

Denise


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 17 months ago from East Coast, United States

I am interested in the fact that you can't take "professional" pictures on public land. Suppose you are taking wedding pix, or something like that? It seems like a ridiculous rule. If you are making a large budget film or something, maybe..My son is a photographer. While still in college, he was taking pictures around one city, of attractive buildings, trying to get a sense of how to photograph architecture. Boy, they didn't like that. He was chased away several times.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Dolores Monet,

Isn't that the craziest thing? They tell you that you can photograph these public places with a high priced permit... but the average student or even small photographer can't possibly afford that permit, yet people are standing around taking iPhone pics all the time. What's the difference? There is an inequality that boggles the mind!

Blessings,

Denise


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 17 months ago from Oakley, CA

The only possible "explanation" I can come up with, is that the pros, with their more extensive and bulkier gear, are more visible, and so fall under scrutiny ever since the 9-11 attacks, and the authorities want to make a show of "keeping an eye on people." After all--detailed photographs of a building's architecture could be used for who-knows-what nefarious purposes in the world of Homeland Paranoia! It's all nonsensical smoke and mirrors, of course, but that would be my best guess as to their (faulty) reasoning.


poetryman6969 profile image

poetryman6969 17 months ago

Some interesting observations. I sometimes wonder about that guy who reads every don't say "y" to person of type "x" on the internet and takes it all to heart. Given the number of things you must never, ever say and the number of people you must never, ever say them too, I imagine he just does not leave his house for fear of offending!

But seriously, I had not realized that the hostility you speak of existed out there.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

DzyMsLizzy,

It's not faulty reasoning at all... except that with records and building specs being public, anyone could actually go in and get those records if they wanted to stage nefarious purposes.. and even if those aren't as public as they used to be, people have a way of getting information if they really want to. So why hassle poor photographers who are out in the open and obviously doing nothing worthy of that kind of scrutiny. Still you are right. We photographers are more visible and therefore more scrutinized. It's a shame that honest people have to pay for others nefarious crimes.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

poetryman6969,

I'm feeling your pain, stuck at home, afraid to leave the house, or open your mouth. I feel like that so often that I mostly keep my trap shut. This is probably why I like to let it all out in this forum. Is that passive-aggressive of me... maybe. But I do get into far less trouble. So nice to see your name and read your comments, even if you feel I gave your one more "y" not to say to "x". Sorry.

Blessings,

Denise


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 17 months ago from California

I have a set of stock phrases that I pull out when I am teaching--I would like to just push a button sometimes and have them come out-your hub reminded me of these moments!


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

AudreyHowitt,

What a great invention that would be... I must have one of those buttons. Thanks for the comment.

Blessings,

Denise


Rachel L Alba profile image

Rachel L Alba 17 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

That was very interesting. I didn't know people said those things. lol I guess it would be frustrating to a photographer. It was good to have been brought to ones attention anyhow. Good hub. I voted up and useful.

Blessings to you.


BlossomSB profile image

BlossomSB 17 months ago from Victoria, Australia

I know what you mean! People's attitudes can be so difficult to understand sometimes. It's like that with my books. In the course of conversation I told an acquaintance about the latest book I had written and she said, "Oh, I'd love to read it, can I borrow it?"


Cyndi10 profile image

Cyndi10 17 months ago from Georgia

I know it's all serious and rightly so. Even with that, this was an enjoyable read. You are obviously very good at what you. The pictures are great! I certainly respect photographers and the beauty of their work.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Rachel L Alba,

Thanks so much for visiting. Yes people say the strangest things. The hardest to deal with is being treated like pariah just because you have a camera.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

BlossomSB,

What is up with people thinking that all art, music and literature should be free? How do they think artist are to live? I just don't get that. What's worse is that when the economy gets bad, art is the first thing people cut. Starving artist isn't really a cliche, it's a reality.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Cyndi10,

Thank you for that. I know I'm a little serious but I wanted to be somewhat amusing too. I'm glad you thought it was. If we can't laugh at ourselves, who can we laugh at? Thanks for commenting.

Blessings,

Denise


florypaula profile image

florypaula 17 months ago

Interesting to hear how a photographer thinks and pretty funny too :) . I am contemplating on buying a professional camera and take classes because I have always loved photography and maybe I can get on this direction. The problem is that I would like to sell my work online after acquiring the knowledge to have great work, but I don't know what websites are better to do this and pay better than others. If you can make some suggestions I would appreciate it, that is if you know these websites.

I had the common sense to never say these things to any photographer, but I am sure many act like it would be absolutely normal to say these things to that artist.

Have a nice day :)


DzyMsLizzy profile image

DzyMsLizzy 17 months ago from Oakley, CA

IMO, for exactly the reasons you state, their logic IS faulty, for it is but excuse-making. 90% of what are passed off as "security measures" is but window-dressing; grandstanding; smoke and mirrors.

For as you say, anyone truly bent on mischief will find ways to get the information they need, and probably in more detail than can be gotten from an architectural photo.

You are correct in saying that professional photographers are targeted because of their high visibility. But again, it is but excuse-making and scapegoating, which is even worse.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 17 months ago from Fresno CA Author

florypaula,

I would be happy to tell you a few sites. They are very strict these days and the photo has to be large and absolutely perfect. Even then if they feel they have too many of that kind already they will reject it. iStock pays more than places like Veer but iStock makes you wait sometimes weeks before you find out if your photo was approved or not. Veer pays less but they don't make you wait so long and they their restrictions are much better. iStock is now owned by Getty Images so don't try to submit to both. It isn't worth it. You could also try, Dreamstime and Alamy. There is a learning curve to each one because each have different rules and size restrictions for the photos.

Blessings,

Denise


Say Yes To Life profile image

Say Yes To Life 16 months ago from Big Island of Hawaii

Joan Crawford said on a photo shoot, always make friends with the photographer. Sounds like good advice to me!

P.S.: Treat your children well - they choose your nursing home.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Say Yes To Life,

So true, my friend, so true. Thank you for the comments.

Blessings,

Denise


debbiepinkston profile image

debbiepinkston 16 months ago from Pereira, Colombia and NW Arkansas

Great advise! Thanks!


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

debbiepinkston,

Thank you so much for your visit and comments.

Blessings,

Denise


social thoughts profile image

social thoughts 16 months ago from New Jersey

This is a great article, Denise! You definitely capture how important photographers are, and the respect you all should be getting! I'm not a photographer, but I see people being rude to them all of the time! I have had a few photographer friends, myself. In fact, a former friend of mine--I plan on writing about--is a model, and whenever there was an event for models and photographers, he referred to it as "models and their photographers," as though photography isn't just as much an art as modeling. People just astound me.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

social thoughts,

It is true. People astound me too. Where would a model be without the photographer to capture just the perfect image of him/her to make him/her immortal? Standing on stage alone, that's where. But we get that a lot, my husband and I. I think the creative types take a lot of grief from people and we are the people who feel things deeply... less able to shrug stuff off. And they say postal workers have it bad... It's artist who should go postal... if only we didn't feel things and other peoples pains so deeply, maybe we would. Haha. Thanks so much for your empathy and comments.

Blessings,

Denise


florypaula profile image

florypaula 16 months ago

Thank you Denise, I will take a look at those websites and maybe at some point I will buy a professional camera and do those photos I love so much.

Have a nice day :)


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

florypaula,

I'm so glad to be of service. Good luck.

Blessings,

Denise


CorneliaMladenova profile image

CorneliaMladenova 16 months ago from Cork, Ireland

I was working as a journalist and as our paper was not rich, I was taking photos too and had this awful experience. Most of all I was disappointed when someone was warning me: "You are not allowed to be here!". :(


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

CorneliaMladenova,

Isn't that silly? What do people think someone with a camera is going to do? Steal their identity? Capture their soul like some native tribes used to think? I just don't understand the mentality especially when these same people don't mind taking iPhone photos of themselves and the same event. Thanks so much for commenting.

Blessings,

Denise


mgt28 profile image

mgt28 16 months ago

I always thought photographers have a hassle free profession. Thank you for sneaking us a little into the 'behind the scenes'.

It is true with many professionals that people can think it is the tools that produce the work. And worse when people want to see how you actually do the work before you finish.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

mgt28,

It is very true. The tools are important and helpful, but if you don't know how to work with them well, they are just tools. It has taken me years to hone my craft and I would say I'm still not where I would like to be. There are so many photographers better than me. Thanks for commenting.

Blessings,

Denise


randomcreative profile image

randomcreative 16 months ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Great job with this topic! In just the two and a half years that I've owned a DSLR, I've heard a number of these comments and know that most professionals hear all of them quite frequently.

Also, there is a permit requirement for parks here in Milwaukee, too, which is so sad. It limits so many professional photographers, particularly newer photographers, from accessing many of the most beautiful areas in the city.


MarleneB profile image

MarleneB 16 months ago from Northern California, USA

My husband is a videographer and I have heard most of these questions. I never thought twice about them until now. It's always something he deals with. But, you really bring the issue to light with your comparison to Shakespeare. I really enjoyed reading your hub about what not to ask a photographer.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

randomcreative,

I'm very sorry to hear that. Perhaps the limiting via permit only photography is to benefit the large networks and movie industry, keeping the smaller independents from being able to get any kind of foothold. Now I'm becoming a conspiracy theorist... its and sad world we live in. Thanks so much for commenting and congrats on your DSLR. Enjoy.

Blessings,

Denise


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

MarleneB,

Thank you so much. I wish your husband much luck with his videography. I appreciate your comment and visit.

Blessings,

Denise


Blond Logic profile image

Blond Logic 16 months ago from Brazil

My husband has been a photographer for many years and despairs at some of the requests and comments he gets.

I am originally from the Fresno area so had to follow you.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Blond Logic,

How awesome! So glad you did. How long did you live here? I understand about your husband's despair, my husband doesn't take it well either. I just ignore people mostly. They just don't know, do they?

Blessings,

Denise


Blond Logic profile image

Blond Logic 16 months ago from Brazil

I was born and lived there until after University. (Go Bulldogs)

Then I moved to the UK for 20 years and now I live in Brazil.

Small world.


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Blond Logic,

Well, It is a small world. I grew up in the Merced (just 60 miles from Fresno) but we moved here to the Big City 20 years ago because of my husband's job. Hope you like it in Brazil. It must be a photographic smorgasbord.

Blessings,

Denise


PeterStip profile image

PeterStip 16 months ago

Oh I adore those Hazelblad lenses, don't you. Or do you prefer Karl Seizz!


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 16 months ago from Fresno CA Author

Peter,

I've had my eye on a Hazelblad Macro lens for some time but it is way out of my price range. I have a Pentax 220 for now and it gets the job done but I know I could do so much more with a better lens and a better camera for that matter. I think when I have mastered all this one can do (and I'm not there yet) I can upgrade. Thanks so much for visiting and commenting.

Blessings,

Denise


andrewdavidlowen profile image

andrewdavidlowen 3 months ago from Fallbrook, CA

I love the comedy of this article. I have a lot of photographer friends I shared this with; they loved it. Particularly like the part about "the baby in the shoe" and "where are the photos of you at this event." Great job!


PAINTDRIPS profile image

PAINTDRIPS 3 months ago from Fresno CA Author

andrewdavidlowen,

Well, I'm tickled that you were amused by this. Thanks so much for commenting and sharing.

Blessings,

Denise

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