10 Tips to Paint Clouds and Skies

Updated on June 18, 2018
Robie Benve profile image

Robie is an artist who believes in the power of positive thinking. She loves sharing art tips and bringing people joy through her paintings.

Tip on how to paint skies and clouds. In this article I am sharing the things that I learned the hard way, hoping it will help others improve their paintings.
Tip on how to paint skies and clouds. In this article I am sharing the things that I learned the hard way, hoping it will help others improve their paintings. | Source

What I Did I Learn About Painting Clouds and Skies?

I'm sharing ten things about painting clouds and skies that I learned the hard way. Hopefully, they will help other artists such as yourself to avoid some painting struggles.

What You'll Learn

  1. The Importance of Soft Edges in Skies
  2. Chromatic Grays Enhance the Vibrant Parts of a Painting
  3. Atmospheric Perspective
  4. Nothing Is Truly White in the Sky
  5. Don't Be a Slave to the Photo
  6. Use Bigger Brushes
  7. The Lightest Light Is Much Lighter Than You'd Think
  8. Thick Paint Versus Glazes
  9. Linear Perspective in Clouds
  10. Rendering Clouds as Solid Objects

Let's begin!

1. The Importance of Soft Edges in Skies

Hard Versus Soft Edges

How you render edges is critical when painting the sky.

  • A hard edge defines neatly where an object ends and the next starts.
  • A soft edge is when the color of a painted object transitions or fades into the adjacent one.

Both sky and clouds have some of the softest edges you can find in nature. Like in any part of the painting, in clouds, a balance between soft and hard edges is very important. Edges will help you describe the volume of the clouds and the translucency.

  • Parts of the clouds are so thin that the sky behind shows through. Mixing the sky color into the cloud color, and keeping the edges soft and broken will help a lot.
  • Also, the sky over the horizon gradually changes color. This can be described very well with glazes and blending.
  • For sharp edges apply thick paint with no blending.

Example of soft and hard edges in clouds. "Much Needed" Detail - Oil painting by Robie Benve, all rights reserved
Example of soft and hard edges in clouds. "Much Needed" Detail - Oil painting by Robie Benve, all rights reserved | Source

2. Chromatic Grays Enhance the Vibrant Parts of a Painting

Create Grays With Triads of Complementary Colors

As much as I love the bright colors of sunsets, I soon realized that a painting full of intense colors does not look good. You need some neutral colors in there to enhance the more intense areas.

Some dull and “ugly” colors are necessary to make the vibrant colors sing. Grays are a great complement to a colorful sky. A bright orange will look even brighter if placed next to a gray.

When I say gray, I don’t mean a mixture of black and white or gray from a tube. I like to mix my grays using several of the colors that I have in the sky and in the rest of the painting.

3. Atmospheric Perspective

Clouds on the Horizon Are Cooler and Lighter

Looking into the distance, colors and hues change, due to the amount of air and particles that are between the viewer and the object. This happens both on land and in the sky.

The more distance between us and an object, the stronger the filtering effect of the atmosphere.

Look at a landscape view that expands to the horizon and notice how:

  • Colors are less intense in the distance, more intense in the objects closer to us.
  • Colors are cooler in the distance and warmer in the foreground.
  • Value contrasts get smaller in the distance.

This is true for vegetation and for cloud formation as well.

Also, an important effect of the thickness of the atmosphere is how the sky color changes.

The sky is darker up above our heads and gets lighter moving toward the horizon.

Observe the Clouds to Help Capture Them in Paintings

4. Nothing is Truly White in the Sky

Chromatic Whites

Everything in nature is influenced by the color of light. I used to paint the top of the sunlit clouds a pure white.

Then I realized that the color of light and the reflection of the blue sky affect all the colors in the landscape, including clouds. Nothing is true white in the sky.

Thus, I started tinting the white with yellow, magenta, violet, or blue, depending on the weather conditions and whether or not a cloud is in direct sunlight. At the minimum, I mix a tiny bit of transparent orange into my white, to add some warmth.

I use zinc white for mixing into colors, and titanium white in highlights. That’s because titanium white is very opaque and lightens the colors very quickly, making them look chalky. Zinc white is more transparent and allows you to keep the vibrancy of the colors while lightening them.

"Glimpse" - Oil on canvas by Robie Benve, all rights reserved
"Glimpse" - Oil on canvas by Robie Benve, all rights reserved | Source

How About You...

Do you find painting skies easy?

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5. Don’t Be a Slave to the Photo

Change Things as Needed to Improve the Painting

If you are painting from a photo, feel free to leave out elements that are in the photo but are not helping the composition. It’s often a good idea to edit the shape of clouds, move trees, smooth a coastline, etc.

Be open to changes that are good for the overall composition of your picture. Your painting will not be hanging next to the reference photo, no one will know if the cloud was rounder or the trees were all the same size.

Also, when painting from photo keep in mind that the camera alters color relationships. Dark areas look much darker in a photo; shadows tend to lose all the details. When observed in real life shadow areas are actually still showing much of their local color and variations.

In the end, the photo will not be hanging next to the painting, feel free to correct things and move them around for the sake of the painting.

6. Use Bigger Brushes

Paint From General to Specific

I thought I was using good size brushes. But I kept saying I wanted to paint loser. I was complaining that my paintings looked overworked. Then I understood: I needed to use bigger brushes.

At the beginning of the painting, your brushes should be the biggest and become smaller as you approach completion of the painting.

  • Think bigger shapes, don’t focus on details until the very end of the painting. Paint general to specific.
  • Start by brushing in thin paint with huge brushes, blend the edges. Just to give you an idea, for a 20x24 inch canvas, I start with 2-inch brushes.
  • Throughout the painting, keep using bigger brushes than those you would instinctively use. Pick up a brush, then put it down and switch to one a couple of sizes bigger.
  • At the end, add details with small brushes, but don’t overdo it.

7. The Lightest Light is Much Lighter than You Would Think

The Sky is Often the Lightest Shape in Your Painting

This is another very important concept that I had a hard time understanding at the beginning. Yellow is a light color, right? So why was the yellow sky in my sunset looking like it wasn’t light enough?

Comparing a value chart to my reference photo and to my painting, I could tell that what I thought was a light value paint color, very often was much darker than I thought.

There is a disconnection about how a color looks while we are mixing it compared to when we apply it to the painting. Temperature and value are relative to what surrounds a color. A color might look warm on the palette, but appear cool once applied on the canvas.

Similarly, I find myself mixing a light value, only to find out that it’s way too dark when I test it on the canvas. As a rule of thumb, even on a hazy day, the sky is most likely the lightest shape in your painting.

  • When mixing a very light color, start from a light color (i.e. white) and add your darker colors a tiny bit at a time. It’s easier to go darker if it’s too light but hard as heck to make a dark color lighter.

Value Scale

Value Scale
Value Scale | Source

Look at Perspective, Coloration, Size, and Lighting

Beautiful cloudy day reference photo I have taken one day from up the steps at the stadium.
Beautiful cloudy day reference photo I have taken one day from up the steps at the stadium. | Source

8. Thick Paint vs Glazes

Start Thin, End Thick

The sky is made of air, vapor, and particles. I like to start with very a thin wash of paint. With acrylics, I dilute them with water, with oils I thin them with odorless turpentine, then I apply glazes on the canvas, varying the colors of the glazes: light value in some areas, and darker in others, depending on the subject.

This initial layout of darks and lights helps me organizing my composition. I start this way both for the sky and more solid objects on the ground. Once I have the layout of the painting clear, I start applying thicker paint in some areas. I have learned that in most cases it looks better if darker colors are applied thinner.

In the sky, I use thicker paint for clouds that I want to appear more solid or closer to the viewer.

"Featherlike" oil painting by Robie Benve, all rights reserved. Sometimes clouds are light and swept by the wind, like this colorful one.
"Featherlike" oil painting by Robie Benve, all rights reserved. Sometimes clouds are light and swept by the wind, like this colorful one. | Source

9. Linear Perspective in Clouds

Vanishing Point

Lines and proportions in the sky are affected by the same rules of perspective that apply to objects on the ground, with vanishing points and all lines pointing towards them.

If you look at the clouds from an airplane, you realize that they are floating parallel to the surface of the Earth.

When you look at the clouds from the ground, it’s like looking up from under a huge table, where the clouds are the tabletop.

Clouds are getting smaller as they get closer to the vanishing point, just as any other object would respond to linear perspective.

10. Rendering Clouds as Solid Objects

Soft-Edged Boxes

When drawing or painting clouds, it helps thinking of them as solid objects. Though they have irregular edges and they might be transparent, visualize them as cuboids, box-shaped objects.

This helps a lot when rendering shadows and lights of a cloud.

If you are painting clouds, make a sketch first on a separate piece of paper, using simple value shapes. Draw them as boxes. Determine which sides are in light, shade, partial shade or reflected light.

That will be your reference for your painting, but you’ll have to make the edges irregular and rounder to have good looking clouds.

Rolling Clouds

Painting Clouds: It Used to Intimidate Me So Much!

I can spend hours looking at the sky and the ever-changing clouds. Especially, I love sunsets. They make me smile inside.

Maybe because of this emotional attachment or just because of a visual pleasure, a few years back I started putting more emphasis on the sky of my landscape paintings.

At first, I was terrified of painting clouds. Once on the canvas, they never looked as I “painted” them in my head; most of the time my painted clouds appeared very amateurish, kind of childish.

But I kept trying. I started looking for art books and read about painting skies; I started watching painting videos on the subject.

Train Your Eye With These Cloud Formations

Self-Taught Art Lessons Made Me Better at Painting Skies

I am very attracted to scenes with astounding sunsets and gorgeous clouds, and one day I started painting them.

At some point, it dawned on me that slowly I had created a series of painting with the sky as the main focus, most of which were sunsets, and they weren’t bad!

Through my self-taught art lessons, I actually got much better at painting skies.

I became known among my friends for my sky paintings. In fact, my first solo art exhibit was all about skies.The card of my first solo art show in 2015.
I became known among my friends for my sky paintings. In fact, my first solo art exhibit was all about skies.The card of my first solo art show in 2015. | Source

Every Painting Teaches You Something New

Looking back at my first cloud painting, I realize how much I learned in the last three years about painting skies.

I keep working on it. Reading art books and articles, watching tutorials, taking classes, but especially painting, putting paint to canvas, helps me understand what works and what doesn’t.

Questions & Answers

    Comments

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      • profile image

        Marcus 

        2 weeks ago

        Nice tips...

      • Robie Benve profile imageAUTHOR

        Robie Benve 

        2 weeks ago from Ohio

        How wonderful to hear that after reading my article you are inspired to paint photos that have been on your bucket list for a while, and of clouds of all subjects! My favorite. :) Dive in, have fun, and enjoy every brushstroke! I hope you'll love the outcome. If not, just give it another try. Happy painting!

      • Karen Hellier profile image

        Karen Hellier 

        3 weeks ago from Georgia

        Wow, you are quite talented Robie. I love the cloud paintings you have included in this article. I have some photos I took of clouds off a cruise ship a few years ago and have always wanted to paint them but didn't know where to start. These tips are wonderful and will really help me. Thanks for the information.

      • Robie Benve profile imageAUTHOR

        Robie Benve 

        6 months ago from Ohio

        Hi Charlotte, I would paint skies with whatever medium you are starting with. oil based, watermedia, or dry medium, all can be used to paint any subject. I started with acrylics, and evolved into oils later, both are great. If you use acrylics, try to create soft edges for the clouds by using thin glazes in layers or mixing paint at the edge while still wet. Experiment and have fun. If you don't like the results at the first try, you can always paint over and change it. :)

      • profile image

        Charlotte 

        6 months ago

        What do you think a beginner should use for painting skies? Should I go for acrylics or oil?

      • Robie Benve profile imageAUTHOR

        Robie Benve 

        2 years ago from Ohio

        LOL RTalloni, that sounds so familiar! Love the positive attitude though, that's the only way to success :)

        Skies are not an easy subject, that's exactly why I try to share the little I know - hoping it might help other artists. Focusing on those that turn out great is the key, I think. Sounds like you are doing great. Thanks a lot for your comment! And happy (or should I say heavenly) painting! :)

      • RTalloni profile image

        RTalloni 

        2 years ago from the short journey

        Thank you for sharing your experience and tips here. I'll be coming back to read the details more carefully because I still struggle with skies. One time my work turns out great, the next time I can only shake my head at the failure! I just say, "Oh well, maybe next time." :)

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