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Printable Classic Winnie-the-Pooh Friendship Greeting Cards to Color

Adele has been a youth services librarian in public libraries for 20 years.

This article has a link to 5 classic Winnie-the-Pooh cards you can print and color

This article has a link to 5 classic Winnie-the-Pooh cards you can print and color

Winnie-the-Pooh Friendship Cards Featuring EH Shepard and A.A. Milne

Though most of us have become familiar with the Winnie-the-Pooh stories through the many films and TV shows, it is the original books written by A. A. Milne and illustrated by EH Shepard that convey the true feel of the stories. Milne’s writes with wonderfully droll phrasing, and his descriptions of the friendships between the characters lend themselves to charmingly understated friendship greeting cards. And Shepard’s illustrations convey the relationships in the Hundred-Acre Wood just perfectly.

Printable Greeting Cards

Following is a collection of 5 quick and easy Winnie-the-Pooh greeting cards to print and color. You have the flexibility to choose one—or several—to print out. They require an 8.5 X 11 inch piece of regular paper or card stock. These printable templates are a fast and simple way for teachers, parents, or librarians to lead an activity with a group, or for just a few children at home. These patterns are available for young children to color (preschoolers, kindergarteners, or elementary school children), but they also work well for any adults who would like a whimsical touch to their friendship or Valentine’s Day cards.

The artwork is from Wikimedia Commons and is in the public domain.

A Quick Tip on Coloring the Cards

Because Shepard’s illustrations are subtle and understated, they benefit from a gentle touch with color. Consider using colored pencil, light crayon, or watercolors for these cards.

Here is the link for the Winnie-the-Pooh Friendship Cards.

You can use 8.5" x 11" card stock regular paper to print out these cards, and then fold them in half so that the picture is in the front.

If you are using card stock, you will find that the cards are easier to fold if you score them with something first. I use a paper clip, since the rounded metal edge seems to work well. To get a good score, take a straight edge (like a ruler) and put it flush with the line on which you want the fold. Then, take the paper clip and run its rounded edge along the line, using the straight edge to guide you. You will make a small impression along that line, and when you fold it, you will see that the edge of the paper is crisper and straighter.

Photos of each Template

The next few photos will show you what each of the greeting card templates look like.

Card Template# 1 – Pooh and Piglet Walking in the Woods

Piglet and Winnie-the-Pooh walk together in the woods on this card.

Piglet and Winnie-the-Pooh walk together in the woods on this card.

Card Template # 2 - Piglet and Christopher Robin

Christopher Robin jumps while Piglet watches.

Christopher Robin jumps while Piglet watches.

Card Template # 3 – Winnie-the-Pooh With Balloon

Winnie-the-Pooh looks pensive, gazing at his balloon on this card.

Winnie-the-Pooh looks pensive, gazing at his balloon on this card.

Card Template # 4 – Winnie-the-Pooh and Christopher Robin Floating in Umbrella

Christopher Robin and Winnie-the-Pooh float together in an umbrella on this card.

Christopher Robin and Winnie-the-Pooh float together in an umbrella on this card.

Card Template # 5 – Winnie-the-Pooh Looks into a Honey Jar

Winnie-the-Pooh looks into his honey jar on this card.

Winnie-the-Pooh looks into his honey jar on this card.

Sample Finished Cards

Below you will see samples of finished cards that have been colored. In the captions, I have named the Crayola ® colors I've used, in case you want to replicate the colors you see.

Be sure to click on the thumbnail pictures if you'd like to see them larger.

Fun Facts about the Actual Winnie-the-Pooh

The characters in A. A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh books were based on the stuffed animals which belonged to his son, who was actually named Christopher Robin. By some accident of history, those original toys are now on display at the New York Public Library.

The stuffed bear who became Winnie-the-Pooh was given to Christopher Robin when he was just one year old, and that bear was just about as big as the young Christopher Robin was! At the beginning, he was named Edward Bear, but Christopher Robin renamed him in honor two animals to which he had taken a fancy. One was Winnie, an actual brown bear that Christopher Robin and his father liked to visit at the London Zoo. A Canadian lieutenant had brought the bear along with him to England when he came to fight in World War I. He soon discovered that it wasn’t practical to take a bear to war, so he left her at the zoo upon hearing his unit was going to be sent to France. He had named his bear Winnie after the Canadian city called Winnipeg.

The “Pooh” portion of the name was taken from the name of a swan. Christopher Robin explains, “This is a very fine name for a swan, because, if you call him and he doesn’t come (which is a thing swans are good at), then you can pretend that you are just saying ‘Pooh!’ to show how little you wanted him.”

A.A. Milne wrote more than 50 pieces of literature during his lifetime, most of the pieces for adults, including five nonfiction books, seven novels, and an amazing 34 plays--along with numerous, poems, stories, and articles. Of course, the Winnie-the-Pooh stories, which he wrote for children, are the most famous by far.

The illustrations by EH Shepard are part of the reason for the success of these books. His drawings get across a sense of action, but also convey the gentle humor of the characters and stories. Most artists have a hard time convincing their parents to let them pursue a career in the arts, but Shepard reported that his father “had quite decided that I should be an artist when I grew up, though I myself considered an artist's life to be a dull one and looked for something more adventurous.” Fortunately for all of us, he ended up pursuing a career in art and illustrated the many stories featuring Winnie-the-Pooh.

He also illustrated other children’s classics, notably The Reluctant Dragon and The Wind in the Willows.

Sources

Fabry, Merrill. "How Winnie-the-Pooh Got His Name." Time Oct. 14, 2015.

"Ernest Howard Shepard." Gale Literature: Contemporary Authors, Gale, 2000.

© 2022 Adele Jeunette