Original Linoleum Cut Art Prints by Peggy Woods

Updated on July 1, 2018
Peggy W profile image

I live in Houston, and I have worked as a nurse. My interests include art, traveling, reading, gardening, cooking, and our wonderful pets.

Linocut of Trube House in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Trube House in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods

Linocuts

Original Linoleum Cut Art Prints—a.k.a. linocuts—are forms of relief printing or printing from a raised surface. Woodcuts, wood engravings and collagraphs are other examples of this medium.

The Chinese first produced woodcuts in the ninth century. Printmaking in this form came to Europe as it emerged from the Middle Ages and began the Renaissance in the early 1400s. Linoleum—a softer carving medium—was invented in England in 1863.

To create a linocut the artist must decide upon the subject matter and then draw the image onto a piece of linoleum which is often attached to a wooden block. This becomes the template for the final piece of art. For visual accuracy consideration must be given while drawing the original because images are reversed when printed.

Linocut titled "Ben" created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled "Ben" created by Peggy Woods

The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a man.

— Winston Churchill

Process of Creating a Linocut

With sharp gouging tools the artist carefully carves into the linoleum removing what will ultimately become the white of the image. What is left untouched becomes the black or colored part of the image.

A slip during this process creates a line and the part removed becomes a permanent element in the final product. If too much is removed the only recourse is to start over with a new piece of linoleum and hope for a steadier hand.

Several artist proofs are produced during the carving process to see how the image is progressing and determine whether additional carving is needed. When satisfied the artist can proceed to the final printing of the edition.

Linocut of Angel created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Angel created by Peggy Woods

An angel can illuminate the thought and mind of man by strengthening the power of vision.

— St. Thomas Aquinas

Printing a Linocut

To print a linoleum block a roller is used to apply a thin and even coat of ink to the surface. If too much ink is applied the thin lines and crevices fill in and cannot be seen in the piece of art. If too little ink is applied too much of the paper shows through the final product. Waste of paper and ink is unavoidable.

After inking and pressing the acid free paper onto the linoleum the print must be allowed to dry. This can take days depending upon whether water, rubber or oil based ink is used.

There are subtle and sometimes noticeable differences in each print as it is nearly impossible to always ink, press and get the exact same results from copy to copy. This is what makes each print an original.

The method of pressing the paper onto the linoleum can be as simple as using the back of a wooden spoon or a brayer to roll and imprint the paper with the inked surface. I have been fortunate to be able to use a 100+ year old printing press at the Printing Museum in Houston to print the majority of my linocuts.

Only acceptable prints are signed and numbered by the artist. A Documentation sheet attesting to the authenticity accompanies all Original Linoleum Cut Art Prints by Peggy Woods.

Galveston Linocut Images

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Linocut of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Galveston, Texas titled Historic Galveston Church created by Peggy WoodsLinocut of Eaton Memorial Chapel in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy WoodsLinocut of St. Patrick Church in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy WoodsLinocut of Trueheart-Adriance Building in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy WoodsLinocut of Elissa's Figurehead in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy WoodsLinocut of "Old Red" in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy WoodsLinocut of Bishop's Palace in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Galveston, Texas titled Historic Galveston Church created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Galveston, Texas titled Historic Galveston Church created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Eaton Memorial Chapel in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Eaton Memorial Chapel in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of St. Patrick Church in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of St. Patrick Church in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Trueheart-Adriance Building in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Trueheart-Adriance Building in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Elissa's Figurehead in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Elissa's Figurehead in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of "Old Red" in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of "Old Red" in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Bishop's Palace in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Bishop's Palace in Galveston, Texas created by Peggy Woods

Documentation Sheet Descriptions of Galveston Images

  • Trube House is viewed at the top of this page. "Noted architect Alfred Muller designed many buildings in Galveston, Texas and one of the most important houses that survived the famous hurricane of 1900 is the Trube House built in 1890. It is an interesting blend of Gothic and Moorish styling and adds significantly to the historic structures in this city known for distinctive edifices."
  • Historic Galveston Church "This is the second reincarnation of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church on this site in Galveston, Texas. It was built in 1904 and the Onion Dome added in 1912. The first church was destroyed along with much of the city in the Great Storm of 1900. Its Moorish design is modeled after the Grand Synagogue of Toledo, Spain."
  • Eaton Memorial Chapel "This beautiful chapel was designed by architect Nicholas Clayton in a Gothic Revival Style and was dedicated in 1882 as a memorial to the founding rector, Reverend Benjamin Eaton. A native of Ireland, Nicholas Clayton opened his own architectural firm in Galveston, Texas in the 1870s and became a major influence in the distinctive style of that city's historic structures."
  • St. Patrick Church "Named after the Patron Saint of Ireland by its mostly Irish congregation, this Gothic structure, completed in 1877, was designed by noted architect and church member Nicholas Clayton. After the "Storm of the Century" in 1900 the building was raised five feet higher to meet new criteria for Galveston mandated by the U.S. Corps of Engineers. St. Patrick Catholic Church is listed by the Texas Historical Commission and continues its role as an active parish."
  • Trueheart-Adriance Building "This historic structure in the Strand area of Galveston was designed by noted architect Nicholas J. Clayton; built in 1882 and housed the first chartered Realty Firm in Texas. The "Neo Renaissance, High Victorian" styled building is now occupied by the Junior League of Galveston."
  • Elissa's Figurehead "Galveston, Texas provides a home berth to the Elissa, a tall sailing ship, which began its life in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1877. the Elissa carried cargoes around the world for over 90 years. Preserved and operated by the Galveston Historical Foundation with the help of numerous volunteers, she has been named a National Historic Landmark and can be seen at the Texas Seaport Museum. I chose to focus attention on Elissa's figurehead with the creation of this particular print."
  • Old Red "UTMB, the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, is graced with this beautiful landmark building completed in 1890. Noted architect Nicholas Clayton designed it in a Romanesque Revival style. Old Red, on the National Register of Historic Places, derives its name from the Texas red granite, sandstone and red pressed brick utilized in constructing this oldest medical building in Texas. With the exception of its original roof, the main structure survived the devastating hurricane of 1900. Old Red continues to serve medical students, faculty, staff and visitors with an architectural grandeur in a city filled with numerous historic and notable structures."
  • Bishop's Palace "Designed by noted architect Nicholas J. Clayton for the family of Walter Gresham, a former Confederate colonel, attorney and legislator, this castle was completed in 1893 at a cost of $250,000 and is ranked among the top 100 homes in the nation for its architectural significance. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.

Constructed from native Texas granite, white limestone and red sandstone, its interior features rare rosewood, satinwood and white mahogany. The ornate wooden staircase took 7 years of work by 61 craftsmen to complete. Fireplaces from all over the world are showcased and the mantle in the ballroom won 1st place at the Philadelphia's World's Fair in 1876.

Purchased by the Catholic diocese of Galveston-Houston in 1923 to serve as a home for bishops of the archdiocese, the mansion is now open to the public. It is located at 1402 Broadway in Galveston, Texas on a boulevard lined with numerous other opulent and important structures."


Which Galveston Linocut is Your Favorite?

See results

San Antonio Linocut Images

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Linocut of The Alamo created by Peggy WoodsLinocut titled Los Patios created by Peggy WoodsLinocut titled Angels on High created by Peggy WoodsHand colored linocut of Angels on High created by Peggy WoodsLinocut titled Classically Adorned created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of The Alamo created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of The Alamo created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Los Patios created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Los Patios created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Angels on High created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Angels on High created by Peggy Woods
Hand colored linocut of Angels on High created by Peggy Woods
Hand colored linocut of Angels on High created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Classically Adorned created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Classically Adorned created by Peggy Woods

Documentation Sheet Descriptions of Places in San Antonio

  • The Alamo "The Alamo...memorialized in legend, glamorized in film and glorified in song and verse...was established in 1718 as the Mission San Antonio de Valero. In 1836 the building became a fortress for the Texas army leading to a famous 13 day siege by overwhelming Mexican forces. Today it is known as the "Shrine of Texas Liberty" and is the most visited tourist site in the state."
  • Los Patios "This delightful place is located in San Antonio, Texas. It is situated along the Salado Creek in the northeast part of the city. Originally started as a gardening nursery, the beautiful oak tree adorned grounds now have restaurants and shops to interest a variety of tastes. White and black swans glide down the waterway and the verdant surroundings are also festooned with the sightings and sounds of peacocks as well as other birds. This particular print originates from a picture that I took of The Galleria with its historic window that was once the entrance to the Old Katy Railroad Depot in San Antonio. It was moved to its present location in 1968."
  • Angels on High "Angels adorn the steeple high atop the chapel at Incarnate Word University in San Antonio, Texas. One can imagine them trumpeting the announcement of numerous gatherings and events. The Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word originally went to San Antonio in 1869 to assist with a cholera epidemic. They stayed to help homeless children, establish the city's first hospital and teach. In 1881 a charter to establish schools was received from the State of Texas. The Academy of the Incarnate Word added college classes in 1909 and was recognized as a fully accredited university in 1996." (A few hand colored 1/1 limited edition Angels on High linocuts have also been created.)
  • Classically Adorned "Stylized columns such as these are indicative of elegant homes around the world where beauty is combined with the function of structural support. This original linocut was inspired by viewing an attractive home near the historic King William District of San Antonio, Texas."

Which San Antonio Linocut is Your Favorite?

See results

Linocuts from Places in Germany

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Linocut titled Herrenberg, Germany created by Peggy WoodsLinocut of St. Blasien in southern Germany created by Peggy WoodsLinocut titled Fortress Marienberg Passageway from Wurzburg, Germany created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Herrenberg, Germany created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Herrenberg, Germany created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of St. Blasien in southern Germany created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of St. Blasien in southern Germany created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Fortress Marienberg Passageway from Wurzburg, Germany created by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Fortress Marienberg Passageway from Wurzburg, Germany created by Peggy Woods

Documentation Sheet Descriptions of Places in Germany

  • Herrenberg, Germany "This is a street scene in the old medieval town of Herrenberg in the southern region of Germany. This happens to be the birthplace of an old friend of mine dating from our former working days as operating room nurses at the Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. The baroque domed building in the background is the Collegiate Church that Martha attends and it is over 700 years old. It houses an important bell collection in its tower. The town is ancient by our standards and so very charming to experience."
  • St. Blasien "In 1997 I traveled to Germany to visit a long-time friend of mine. We met each other when we were fellow operating room nurses at Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. Martha was able to show me many beautiful sights including the town of St. Blasien. A huge domed former Benedictine Abbey dominates the landscape of this small town in the southern region of Germany. This building with the winged creature atop its roof drew my interest."
  • Fortress Marienberg Passageway "While visiting Wurzburg, Germany with an old friend of mine, we took a bus ride over the Main River and up the hill to the Fortress Marienberg. It was a fortified retreat around 1000 B.C. and has since served various purposes such as a church, fortified castle and Renaissance palace. Now it dominates the landscape and serves as a museum with collections of art, an armory, etc. I thought that this passageway between buildings was interesting subject matter for my camera and now my linoleum block art prints."

Which Linocut from Germany is Your Favorite?

See results
Click thumbnail to view full-size
On the Vine hand colored linocut by Peggy WoodsOn the Vine hand colored linocut by Peggy WoodsLinocut of Grapes created by Peggy WoodsHand colored linocut of Grapes created by Peggy WoodsHand colored linocut of Grapes created by Peggy Woods
On the Vine hand colored linocut by Peggy Woods
On the Vine hand colored linocut by Peggy Woods
On the Vine hand colored linocut by Peggy Woods
On the Vine hand colored linocut by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Grapes created by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Grapes created by Peggy Woods
Hand colored linocut of Grapes created by Peggy Woods
Hand colored linocut of Grapes created by Peggy Woods
Hand colored linocut of Grapes created by Peggy Woods
Hand colored linocut of Grapes created by Peggy Woods

The sun, with all those planets revolving around it and dependent on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else in the universe to do.

— Galileo

Grape Print Documentation Sheets

For my linocut documentation sheets I used appropriate quotes for my grape prints. Each of my On the Vine linocuts I chose to hand color. In some cases I also hand colored some of the smaller grape images.

The juice of the grape is the liquid quintessence of concentrated sunbeams.

— Thomas Love Peacock

Which do you like better?

See results

My Linocuts of Birds and Animals

Click thumbnail to view full-size
"Seaside Serenity" linocut by Peggy WoodsUntitled cat face linocut by Peggy Woods"Running Free" linocut by Peggy WoodsLinocut titled "J.R." by Peggy WoodsUntitled linocut by Peggy Woods - Documentation sheet reads Hooray for Animal Shelters!"Birds of a feather..." linocut by Peggy Woods"His Majesty" linocut by Peggy Woods
"Seaside Serenity" linocut by Peggy Woods
"Seaside Serenity" linocut by Peggy Woods
Untitled cat face linocut by Peggy Woods
Untitled cat face linocut by Peggy Woods
"Running Free" linocut by Peggy Woods
"Running Free" linocut by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled "J.R." by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled "J.R." by Peggy Woods
Untitled linocut by Peggy Woods - Documentation sheet reads Hooray for Animal Shelters!
Untitled linocut by Peggy Woods - Documentation sheet reads Hooray for Animal Shelters!
"Birds of a feather..." linocut by Peggy Woods
"Birds of a feather..." linocut by Peggy Woods
"His Majesty" linocut by Peggy Woods
"His Majesty" linocut by Peggy Woods

I have had some fun creating images of birds and animals. Some of the linocut images were inspired by family pets. In the poll below the linocut of "Ben" is the second image at the top of this page.

Which of My Bird or Animal Prints is Your Favorite?

See results

Linocuts of Places in Texas

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Linocut titled May Justice Prevail by Peggy Woods - Fort Bend County Courthouse in Richmond, TexasLinocut of Port Isabel Lighthouse by Peggy WoodsUntitled Linocut (St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Houston, Texas) by Peggy WoodsUntitled Linocut Hand Colored (St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Houston, Texas) by Peggy WoodsLinocut titled Arches to Enlightenment by Peggy Woods - Rice University in Houston, TexasLinocut titled Medieval Inspiration by Peggy Woods - Our Lady of Walsingham Church in Spring Branch, TexasLinocut titled Medieval Inspiration (Hand Colored) by Peggy Woods - Our Lady of Walsingham Church in Spring Branch, TexasUntitled Linocut (Mission-style Church in McAllen, Texas) by Peggy WoodsLinocut titled Praha Prayers by Peggy Woods - One of the Painted Churches near Schulenburg, TexasLinocut titled Katy's Heritage by Peggy Woods (First concrete rice dryer in Texas located in the town of Katy.)Old Katy Depot linocut by Peggy WoodsCrowning Tribute by Peggy Woods - The 32 story Niels Esperson Building in downtown Houston was the tallest structure in Texas when it opened in 1927.
Linocut titled May Justice Prevail by Peggy Woods - Fort Bend County Courthouse in Richmond, Texas
Linocut titled May Justice Prevail by Peggy Woods - Fort Bend County Courthouse in Richmond, Texas
Linocut of Port Isabel Lighthouse by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Port Isabel Lighthouse by Peggy Woods
Untitled Linocut (St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Houston, Texas) by Peggy Woods
Untitled Linocut (St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Houston, Texas) by Peggy Woods
Untitled Linocut Hand Colored (St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Houston, Texas) by Peggy Woods
Untitled Linocut Hand Colored (St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Houston, Texas) by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Arches to Enlightenment by Peggy Woods - Rice University in Houston, Texas
Linocut titled Arches to Enlightenment by Peggy Woods - Rice University in Houston, Texas
Linocut titled Medieval Inspiration by Peggy Woods - Our Lady of Walsingham Church in Spring Branch, Texas
Linocut titled Medieval Inspiration by Peggy Woods - Our Lady of Walsingham Church in Spring Branch, Texas
Linocut titled Medieval Inspiration (Hand Colored) by Peggy Woods - Our Lady of Walsingham Church in Spring Branch, Texas
Linocut titled Medieval Inspiration (Hand Colored) by Peggy Woods - Our Lady of Walsingham Church in Spring Branch, Texas
Untitled Linocut (Mission-style Church in McAllen, Texas) by Peggy Woods
Untitled Linocut (Mission-style Church in McAllen, Texas) by Peggy Woods
Linocut titled Praha Prayers by Peggy Woods - One of the Painted Churches near Schulenburg, Texas
Linocut titled Praha Prayers by Peggy Woods - One of the Painted Churches near Schulenburg, Texas
Linocut titled Katy's Heritage by Peggy Woods (First concrete rice dryer in Texas located in the town of Katy.)
Linocut titled Katy's Heritage by Peggy Woods (First concrete rice dryer in Texas located in the town of Katy.)
Old Katy Depot linocut by Peggy Woods
Old Katy Depot linocut by Peggy Woods
Crowning Tribute by Peggy Woods - The 32 story Niels Esperson Building in downtown Houston was the tallest structure in Texas when it opened in 1927.
Crowning Tribute by Peggy Woods - The 32 story Niels Esperson Building in downtown Houston was the tallest structure in Texas when it opened in 1927.

Which Linocut of Places in Texas is Your Favorite?

See results

My Other Linocuts

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Linocut of Oklahoma State Capitol by Peggy WoodsUntitled (Peaceful Valley) by Peggy Woods - This is the very first linocut I ever created.
Linocut of Oklahoma State Capitol by Peggy Woods
Linocut of Oklahoma State Capitol by Peggy Woods
Untitled (Peaceful Valley) by Peggy Woods - This is the very first linocut I ever created.
Untitled (Peaceful Valley) by Peggy Woods - This is the very first linocut I ever created.

Video of Relief Printmaking which Applies to Woodcuts as well as Linocuts

© 2018 Peggy Woods

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      3 days ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Sherry,

      You must have had a good art class in school. I learned how to create linocuts as an adult. The schools I attended never taught how to make a linocut.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      3 days ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Natalie,

      Thank you so much for sharing my article with others. It is always interesting to me to find out which of my linocuts becomes most favored.

    • Sherry Hewins profile image

      Sherry Hewins 

      4 days ago from Sierra Foothills, CA

      These are beautiful. I remember doing linocuts in school, but nothing nearly this detailed.

    • Natalie Frank profile image

      Natalie Frank 

      4 days ago from Chicago, IL

      FYI - I also submitted it to Reddit. Hopefully, that will get it some additional views.

    • Natalie Frank profile image

      Natalie Frank 

      4 days ago from Chicago, IL

      Wow! You are really talented! Some of them seem so intricate. You not only have to be able to sketch and draw but to carve as well to end up with the finished product. I just met someone last night who does wood block carvings. I'm going to share the article with him and post it to my facebook page if you don't mind. I think of all of the prints, the one of the red grapes was my favorite but I also loved the angel. Thanks for sharing this with us. I hope you'll do another article about your work soon.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      6 days ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Genna,

      Nice to be able to introduce you to the linocut art form. Thanks for your comment on my pieces.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 

      6 days ago from Massachusetts, USA

      Hi Peggy...

      I've never heard of linocuts before reading your article. This is beautiful! And your linocuts are stunning. I don't share your remarkable talent (I can't draw a straight line with a ruler) and am so in awe of your images. Thank you for sharing this art form with us.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      7 days ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Rajan,

      I am happy to be able to introduce you to this type of art. Thanks for your comment regarding my original linoleum cut art prints.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      7 days ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Gerry,

      Good luck with your efforts in making some linocuts of your own. The nice thing is that you do not need that many tools to do it. Also if the end result is not pleasing you can always start again. That does happen! Not everyone of them is a masterpiece judging from my own personal experience.

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 

      7 days ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Surely a lot of time, dedication, and patience above all, must have gone into making these linocuts.

      This was a educational experience as well, having no prior knowledge of this art style.

      Thank you for sharing your creativity.

    • Gerry Glenn Jones profile image

      Gerry Glenn Jones 

      8 days ago from Somerville, Tennessee

      Thanks so much, Peggy, I really want to try and do this. I love to set and reach new goals in my life

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      8 days ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Patricia,

      I have featured some of my linocuts in specific articles related to a particular location but decided to assemble almost all of them in one place which is what I did in this post. I am pleased that you like them. Sending good thoughts your way today.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 

      8 days ago from sunny Florida

      I am sure I have read this before but it is just so amazing that I had to come back. I cannot imagine the vision and patience this must take. What a gift it is to have those among us who discover how to create such works of art. Angels once again are headed your way ps

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      11 days ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Gerry,

      As to the type of linoleum used for creating my linocuts...I simply purchase mine already attached to blocks of various sizes at art supply stores. I do not think it is any special type of linoleum.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      11 days ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Chitrangada Sharan,

      Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. It was fun creating these linocuts and I may be creating more soon of some more Galveston images. Will plan a trip down there soon to take photos of some of the historic sites.

    • Gerry Glenn Jones profile image

      Gerry Glenn Jones 

      11 days ago from Somerville, Tennessee

      I wasn't aware of this art form until I read your article. It looks like it would be fun to do, and you are very good at it! What kind of Linoleum do you use?

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image

      Chitrangada Sharan 

      11 days ago from New Delhi, India

      Awesome work!

      You are so talented and so creative. These are super fine works of art and very neat. Needless to say, it requires creative skill with lot of patience.

      Difficult to choose the best, all are wonderful.

      Thanks for sharing your talent!

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello LoyalFrienemy,

      Thanks for voting which of the linocuts were your favorites and leaving your welcomed comment.

    • LoyalFrienemy profile image

      LoyalFrienemy 

      2 weeks ago

      Very informative and interesting work. I really liked reading about linocuts and also enjoyed voting for my favorite ones. I admire your talent and creativity ma'am.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Audrey,

      Thanks! :)

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 

      2 weeks ago from California

      Gorgeous!!!

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi RedElf,

      I guess it does take a bit of creativity or at least a mindset and persistence to create art. Then again...art is "in the eye of the beholder" as the old saying goes. What one person sees as art may not necessarily be another person's definition. Thanks for the Independence Day greetings!

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi manatita,

      To answer your question...creating a linocut does take a bit of time because all efforts are not necessarily successful when carving. Even after that every print does not come out as expected. So putting it all together...time is definitely a factor. Thank you for the 4th of July greetings!

    • RedElf profile image

      RedElf 

      2 weeks ago from Canada

      Happy Fourth! You forgot to mention in your "how-to" that first, you have to be an awesome artist. Lovely images. Thanks so much for sharing these.

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 

      2 weeks ago from london

      Peggy you are a great artiste. I admire this quality in you. Linocuts must take so time, no? Happy July 4th 2018.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Jackie,

      Happy 4th of July to you also. Thanks for taking the time to look at my linocuts and leave a comment.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Sandra,

      Thanks for taking the time to vote for your favorite linocuts in the polls. As more people vote it will be interesting to see if the percentages change.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Roberta,

      The art class that I took in high school was an elective and creating linocuts were not a part of the curriculum. Nice that it was when you attended high school. I remember making a ceramic piece and doing an oil painting. Of course a great part of it was studying art history.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 

      2 weeks ago from The Beautiful South

      Hard to choose from your beauties. You are so gifted!

      Happy 4th!

    • Supersweetsandra profile image

      Sandra Holt 

      2 weeks ago from Grand Rapids, Michigan

      I had fun voting for my favorites!

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 

      2 weeks ago from the short journey

      Beautiful work! Enjoyed seeing all your examples and the info you've provided on linocut work is interesting. I remember the opportunity to try my hand at this in high school art. It was very appealing work.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Linda,

      Thanks for taking the time to vote in the polls as to which one was your favorite. I am finding the results interesting.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Greetings LeonJane,

      Yes I have received several commissions to create linocut pieces. Here are some examples of the work I have done on commission.

      In one case the person wanted to have a linocut created of their old family farmhouse prior to it being destroyed. She sent several photos and I worked from those after discussing it via telephone.

      Another one was a dog's face. She sent a photo of the dog to me. It became a Christmas gift to her boss who owned the dog.

      One of them ended up being gifts for the board of directors of a business. It was an old rice dryer in Brookshire, Texas after they had seen the one I had created of the one in Katy, Texas.

      In every case they also received the linoleum block upon which it was carved along with the prints. Thank you for asking.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Robert,

      Happy to be able to inform you about this type of art. You were most probably familiar with woodcuts. Linocuts are similar but the medium is softer to carve.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 

      2 weeks ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Your art is wonderful, Peggy. I admire your skill and your patience! I loved looking at your photos. I voted in every poll, but it was often hard for me to choose a favourite.

    • LeonJane profile image

      LeonJane 

      2 weeks ago from Australia

      Your work is amazing, quite detailed and intricate. The black and white architectural pieces are bold and dramatic, I love them all. They would make great book cover art, have you been commissioned yet? Your article is very well written and rich with information, quite a pleasure to read, thanks.

    • Robert Sacchi profile image

      Robert Sacchi 

      2 weeks ago

      You are very talented with linoleum cuts. I didn't know there was such an art form until I read your article.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Pamela,

      Creating all forms of art takes time and patience. I am sure your stained glass is very rewarding when you get to see the beautiful colors and patterns. I have a cousin who has created some beautiful stained glass panels and windows. That takes talent also! Thanks for your comment regarding my linocuts.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      2 weeks ago

      Hi Peggy, And I thought making my stained glass art was tough. This process souds so tricky and time consuming. I loved all the prints and had difficulty choosing a favorite. I like the way you inserted all those quotes as well. Great article.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Claudia,

      Hope you try your hand at creating some linocuts. It is always amazing when printing some artist proofs to see what has been created after the carving process. Sometimes it is even better than imagined! At least I find it to be that way. Of course sometimes it just does not work out but lessons are learned.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Claudia Mitchell 

      2 weeks ago

      Wow Peggy - These are stunning! This is an art form I've always been interested in trying.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Mary,

      Thanks for the compliment Mary. I had fun creating these linocuts and may start doing some more in the near future.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 

      2 weeks ago from Ontario, Canada

      I am impressed at the ones you featured here. I don't know if I will have the patience to do some of these. They are truly amazing.

    • Peggy W profile imageAUTHOR

      Peggy Woods 

      2 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

      Hello GlenR,

      You were quick to make a first comment. There is definitely waste when it comes to creating a good linocut print. Quite often I have printed many more that do not make the cut to be numbered and signed. It is all a part of the process.

    • Glenis Rix profile image

      GlenR 

      2 weeks ago from UK

      I am so impressed! It looks like a complicated and messy process. You must be a very good artist and have the patience of a saint. Congratulations on both your talent and skill.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, feltmagnet.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://feltmagnet.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)