How to Draw a Trumpet

Updated on February 1, 2018
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Anyone Can Draw a Trumpet

Many of the people I taught to draw over the years told me they really didn't have raw artistic talent; some claimed they couldn't draw a straight line. Well, I have been making a living as an artist my whole life, and I still can't really draw a perfectly straight line.

My point is that anyone can learn to draw if they just spend a little time and effort trying. For this drawing tutorial, the subject is a trumpet. It's a rather complex drawing challenge, and if you don't know the parts of a trumpet already, it will require you to familiarize yourself with the basic parts. You may also want to study a picture of a trumpet for reference.

The various parts of the trumpet
The various parts of the trumpet

The Parts of a Trumpet

Take a moment and study the diagram that lists the various parts and sections. I'm going to refer to these areas in my instructions as you work your way through this tutorial. When you're ready, grab a pencil and a couple sheets of paper and begin!

1. Draw the Basic Shape

Any complex or challenging subject, like the trumpet, is composed of simple, basic shapes. Draw a hotdog shape with a straight line on top, as shown in the drawing.

2. Establish the Trumpet Shape

Add to the basic skeletal lines you drew in the previous step. Add the bell shape on the right.

3. Draw the Valves

The rectangular shapes positioned in the middle of the trumpet are called valves. A trumpet typically has three of these. To draw these, just think of long rectangles.

4. Draw Finger Buttons

Think of these finger buttons as three capital letter "T's" sitting on top of the valves. Don't forget to draw the mouthpiece as well!

5. Add Details

Draw the first valve slide, the second valve tube, and the third valve slide as shown. On the lower part of the trumpet toward the front, add the tuning slide detail and the water key.

6. Sketch More Details

Draw in the finger rings on the top of the third valve slide and next to the top of the valve chambers. Then, add the finger hook on top of the first valve slide.

7. Add the Final Details

All that's left to draw now is the soldered connection seams, shading, and reflections. This is probably the most challenging part of this drawing tutorial. My best advice to you is to try drawing what you see in my drawing or reference a photo of a trumpet and draw what you see.

The hard part about drawing is really not in your hands. The hardest part is getting your hands, brain, and eyes to communicate and work together as a finely-tuned instrument. As they learn to work together at first, they teach one another. As you draw more and more, they learn to work together as a single unit. Frustration plays a big part in this process.

Like anything worthwhile, learning to draw is going to take dedication, time and consistent practice if you want to get better at it. If you can stick with it for a time, this brain-eye-hand combo becomes a single unit. The good thing about that is those who have been doing this awhile can literally see something in their head and put that onto paper.

I have been drawing every day for the past 50+ years. There are few things I cannot draw easily anymore. You can be that good one day if you stick with it and practice just a few minutes each day. Best of luck with your drawing!

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    • MKayo profile image
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      MKayo 4 years ago from Texas

      DDE - thanks! Hope you found it helpful!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      A great idea of how to draw a trumpet, you taught me a simple way

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