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10 Printable Classic Winnie the Pooh Coloring Sheets

Adele has been a youth librarian for 20 years. She has learned lots about making crafts easy and inexpensive.

This article includes 10 printable pages for Classic Winnie-the-Pooh coloring sheets.

This article includes 10 printable pages for Classic Winnie-the-Pooh coloring sheets.

Classic Winnie-the-Pooh Coloring Sheets

Most people know about Winnie-the-Pooh through movies and television shows, but it is worth going back to the classic books written by A. A. Milne and illustrated by EH Shepard. Milne writes with a wonderfully droll voice, and his observations make for quotes that apply to all of our lives, no matter what our age. And Mr. Shepard’s drawings capture the relationships between all the characters in the Hundred-Acre Wood just perfectly.

With the 100th anniversary of the first book in 2024, now seems a good time to offer these coloring sheets that the showcase the whimsical drawings along with words of wisdom from Winnie-the-Pooh and his companions.

Printable Coloring Sheets

Following is a collection of 10 quick and easy Winnie-the-Pooh coloring sheets. You can choose one—or several—to print out on a regular size piece of paper. These printable pages are a simple and fast way for librarians, teachers, or parents to lead a Winnie-the-Pooh activity with a group of children, or to do as a craft project at home. They are designed for young children to color (preschoolers, kindergarteners, or elementary school children), but they can also work well for adults who want who would like to decorate their space with scenes from the Hundred-Acre Wood.

The drawings come from Wikimedia Commons and are in the public domain. Feel free to print these for personal or classroom use. Permission for these designs is not granted for commercial use.

A Note on Coloring

Try using a light touch on these pictures since Shepard’s illustrations are so understated and subtle. You can use light crayon, watercolors, or colored pencil for these pages.

Here is the link for the Winnie-the-Pooh Coloring Sheets.

Photos of Each Page

The following ten photos will show you what each of the pages look like. I’ve also included the text of the quote that is on the corresponding page. Note that there are several small thumbnails across the top of the page. If you want to enlarge them, simply click on the photo you want to see.

Sample Finished Coloring Sheets

Here are some sample finished coloring sheets.

Sheet #3

This is a completed sample of coloring sheet # 3 on the pdf document. The picture shows Winnie-the-Pooh, Christopher Robin, and Eeyore.

This is a completed sample of coloring sheet # 3 on the pdf document. The picture shows Winnie-the-Pooh, Christopher Robin, and Eeyore.

Sheet #7

This is a completed sample of coloring sheet # 7 on the pdf document. The picture shows Winnie-the-Pooh and Piglet.

This is a completed sample of coloring sheet # 7 on the pdf document. The picture shows Winnie-the-Pooh and Piglet.

Sheet # 8

This is a completed sample of coloring sheet # 8 on the pdf document. The picture shows Winnie-the-Pooh, Rabbit, Kanga, Owl, Piglet, and Roo.

This is a completed sample of coloring sheet # 8 on the pdf document. The picture shows Winnie-the-Pooh, Rabbit, Kanga, Owl, Piglet, and Roo.

Sheet #9

This is a completed sample of coloring sheet # 9 on the pdf document. The picture shows Winnie-the-Pooh, Christopher Robin, and Piglet.

This is a completed sample of coloring sheet # 9 on the pdf document. The picture shows Winnie-the-Pooh, Christopher Robin, and Piglet.

Fun Facts about the Winnie-the-Pooh Books

The familiar characters—like Winnie-the-Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, Kanga and Roo—are based on the stuffed animals which belonged to A. A. Milne’s actual son, Christopher Robin. The New York Public Library managed to get ownership of the toys, and you can see them on display at their Schwarzman branch.

Winnie-the-Pooh was the name of a stuffed bear which Christopher Robin received when he was just year-old, and at that time the stuffed bear was almost as big as he was! At first, he was called Edward Bear, but Christopher Robin renamed him after two animals with which he had become fascinated. One was Winnie, a brown bear which Christopher Robin loved to visit at the London Zoo. He had been a pet of a Canadian lieutenant who had brought him over to England from Winnipeg when he was shipped there to fight in World War I. Realizing that war was no place for a tame bear, the lieutenant left him at the London Zoo before he shipped out to France.

And why did Christopher Robin tack “Pooh” onto the end of the name? It was the name of a swan he would see in the park. In Milne’s book When We Were Very Young he explains, “This is a very fine name for a swan, because, if you call him and he doesn’t come (which is a thing swans are good at), then you can pretend that you are just saying ‘Pooh!’ to show how little you wanted him.”

Eeyore also has an unusual name, and it is taken from a phonetic recreation of the way a donkey sounds when he is braying. Just imagine a donkey saying, “eeyore, eeyore!”

In his lifetime, A. A. Milne wrote over 50 pieces of literature. Most of what he wrote was actually for adults, including novels, nonfiction books, and 34 plays. But his most famous works are the poems and stories which he wrote for a children’s audience.

One reason that these books were so successful was that they contained the work of the illustrator, EH Shepard. His drawings capture the gentle humor of Milne’s poems and stories. When Shepard was a boy, he liked to make drawings that went with the stories his sister wrote. Most people from that time had to work to convince their parents to let them pursue a career in art, but Shepard says that his father “had quite decided that I should be an artist when I grew up, though I myself considered an artist’s life to be a dull one and looked for something more adventurous.”

In the end , though, he had quite a successful career as an illustrator. Besides the Winnie-the-Pooh stories Shepard illustrated quite a few other children’s classics, titles like The Reluctqnt Dragon, and The Wind in the Willows.

Winnie-the-Pooh Character Pool

Sources

Fabry, Merrill. "How Winnie-the-Pooh Got His Name." Time Oct. 14, 2015.

"Ernest Howard Shepard." Gale Literature: Contemporary Authors, Gale, 2000.

Merriam-Webster. (n.d.). Where did Eeyore in Winnie the pooh get his name? Merriam-Webster. Retrieved July 3, 2022, from https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/what-does-eeyore-mean#:~:text=But%20Eeyore%2C%20the%20donkey%2C%20takes,a%20staple%20of%20the%20genre.

© 2022 Adele Jeunette