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Polymer Clay Fantasy Flower Brooch/Pin, Earrings or Ring Tutorial

Colorful Blooms to Wear Year-Round!

Many polymer clay tutorials exist for making either very basic or realistic flowers. I have designed something different: colorful, cheerful and fun polymer clay flower jewelry to wear all year long. These playful flowers will brighten your outfits—and your spirits—even during the cold, drab winter months.

In this tutorial, I will show you how to create your own whimsical polymer clay flowers in whatever size you wish and then turn them into brooches, pins, pendant, rings or earrings. Choose your favorite color combinations and add your own personal flair to the petals and centers to make your creations unique!

This project is easy enough for polymer clay newbies to complete successfully and also unusual and pretty enough to interest intermediate crafters who have experience with this material.

Note: All photos on this page were taken by the author and may not be used without written permission.

A fun and easy project!
A fun and easy project! | Source

Will This Be Your First Jewelry Making Project?

Will this polymer clay fantasy flower jewelry project be your first jewelry making project?

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Step 1: Choose Three Contrasting Polymer Clay Colors

You Will Need Two Main Colors and an Accent Color

Choose two main colors of polymer clay for your fantasy flower. They should be strongly contrasting colors that mix nicely. For example, I chose yellow and red, which are high contrast colors and become orange when mixed. Yellow and blue would have been equally good choices since they contrast well and become green when combined. But green and red would not have been a good color combination because they become a muddy brown when mixed together. It is a good idea to try mushing together small amounts of the two colors you want to use to make sure you like the color they create when mixed.

Choose a third color of clay as an accent color that contrasts well with the two main colors and also with the color they create when blended. I chose a light wasabi green that contrasted well with not only against the yellow and red but also with the orange mixture they would create. You will need only a very small amount of this accent color.

Use a High Quality Clay

I recommend using either Premo! Sculpey or Kato Polyclay for jewelry making. Both are high quality formulas that are strong and not brittle after curing if they are baked according to the respective manufacturers' recommended temperatures. Premo Sculpey is easier to find and comes in a very wide range of premixed colors. It's what I used for this project. Kato Polyclay is great, too, but is firmer than Premo and needs more conditioning. FIMO Professional is also excellent, but I recommend it only for very experienced or professional users because it includes a very limited number of colors designed specifically for mixing custom color blends, which is not as intuitive when working with polymer clay as it is when mixing paints.

Tip: Don't use Sculpey III for anything except kids' projects! It's a much weaker formula that is more brittle after baking and breaks easily.

Choose three coordinating colors of polymer clay for your flower jewelry: two main colors and an accent.
Choose three coordinating colors of polymer clay for your flower jewelry: two main colors and an accent. | Source

Step 2: Condition the Polymer Clay and Create a Modified Skinner Blend Sheet

Next, you will create a color gradient, using a slight modification of the popular "Skinner blend" technique.

  • Condition the lighter of the main colors using a pasta machine dedicated exclusively to this purpose. (If you don't have one, see the alternate instructions for conditioning and rolling out by hand.) The amount of each color you need will depend on the size you want your flower to be. I usually condition half of a 2-ounce block of each of the two main colors to make sure I have enough for a large brooch/pin sized flower.
  • Roll out the conditioned clay at the pasta machine's thickest setting (#1 on an Atlas brand pasta machine) and place it on a clean sheet of wax paper.
  • Repeat with the darker main color.

Cut the Triangles for the Modified Skinner Blend

  • Cut matching squares or rectangles (mine were about 2.5" square) from the light and dark color sheets.
  • Cut each square or rectangle half diagonally into triangles.
  • Take one triangle of each color and reassemble it into a square or rectangle, pressing the edges together where the two colors meet so that the triangles stick together as a single sheet, as shown in the photo below.
  • Repeat with the remaining two triangles.

Cut the polymer clay sheets into squares and then triangles for the modified Skinner blend.
Cut the polymer clay sheets into squares and then triangles for the modified Skinner blend. | Source

Stack the Two-Color Sheets

  • Rotate one of the sheets so that it matches the other sheet.
  • Stack them together so that the colors on the top sheet match the colors on the bottom sheet.
  • Press the two sheets together so that they stick and become a single sheet twice as thick as the original rectangles.

Make the Modified Skinner Blend

  • Fold the polymer clay sheet in half loosely and roll the folded sheet through the pasta machine.
  • The sheet must be folded as shown below so that color 1 touches color 1 at one end and color 2 touches color 2 at the other end.
  • Make sure you fold the sheet exactly the same way each time. Do not change the orientation of the sheet or the direction of the fold.

Fold the double-thickness sheet so the same colors meet at the corners.
Fold the double-thickness sheet so the same colors meet at the corners. | Source
  • Adjust the pasta machine rollers to the next-thickest setting (#2 on an Atlas pasta machine).
  • Fold the sheet again, exactly the same way, and roll it through the pasta machine again. Repeat the folding and rolling approximately 10 times.
  • Adjust the pasta machine rollers to a medium-thick setting (#3 on an Atlas machine) another 10 times or more, until you are pleased with the blend.

Don't worry if it seems like nothing much is happening after the first few passes through the pasta machine. You'll probably start to see some strange patterns after about 10 passes. That's normal!

The modified Skinner blend after about 10 passes through the pasta machine
The modified Skinner blend after about 10 passes through the pasta machine | Source
  • Continue folding and rolling until the color gradient is as smooth and gradual as you would like.
  • The exact number of passes required to achieve a color gradient varies, but usually it takes at least 20 passes to get a smooth blend. You will start to see fairly distinct bands of color that will start to blend with the adjacent colors gradually with each pass through the pasta machine rollers.
  • Place the modified Skinner blend sheet on a sheet of wax paper.

The modified Skinner blend is ready as soon as you're happy with the gradient shading.
The modified Skinner blend is ready as soon as you're happy with the gradient shading. | Source

Modified vs. Tradition Skinner Blend

In Judith Skinner's original Skinner blend technique, the two ends of the final color gradient remain the two original colors used to make the blend. Since I didn't want any of the pure yellow or pure red to be included in the color gradient for my polymer clay fantasy flowers, I modified the technique by assembling the two-tone triangles with the diagonal edges aligned.

If you would prefer to have some of the two original colors remain visible at the ends of your gradient sheet, you can make a traditional Skinner blend instead. When you abut the diagonal edges of each pair of triangles, offset the edges a little so that a corner of each triangle extends a bit past the ends of the seam. Trim off the bits that extend past those edges to square up the sheet. Repeat with the other two triangles, then follow the instructions above to stack the two-color sheets and create the gradient blend. The following video demonstrates this method, except that it doesn't stack the two two-color sheets.

Cindy Lietz's Teardrop Blend

Cindy Lietz from the wonderful Polymer Clay Tutor site created a simplified variation on Judith Skinner's original Skinner blend technique. Instead of rolling and cutting triangles and butting them together, she rolls balls of conditioned clay and uses an index finger to shape them into fat teardrops and then sticks them together side-by-side, alternating the points of the drops up and down. She demonstrates her teardrop blend method in the following video.

Alternate Polymer Clay Blending Method if You Don't Have a Pasta Machine

Making a blended color gradient sheet is much faster with a pasta machine. But if you don't have one, you can try using the Cindy Lietz's manual teardrop blend method. Use just two colors to get the same look as in my photos, and roll the finished blend between 5-card stacks of playing cards. Cindy demonstrates this method in the following video.

Step 3: Apply Metal Leaf to the Polymer Clay Sheet and Crackle It

Next, you will apply a sheet of metal leaf to the Skinner blend sheet and then roll out the metal leaf-covered clay sheet to break apart the metal leaf and create a crackle effect.

  • Open a book of variegated metal leaf. (If you don't like the look of the variegated leaf, feel free to substitute gold, silver, or copper metal leaf.)

Variegated metal leaf
Variegated metal leaf | Source
  • Flip the tissue paper separator sheet to the right side, exposing the back of a sheet of metal leaf.

Apply the Metal Leaf

  • Place the Skinner blend sheet on the back of the metal leaf sheet (the left-hand "page"). The metal leaf should adhere readily to the clay.
  • Close the book from right to left. Then, holding the book closed, flip it right side up.
  • Open the book to where the metal leaf-topped clay is.
  • Cover it with another separator sheet or a square of tracing paper or baking parchment.
  • Use the outer edge of your hand to smooth and burnish the metal leaf onto the polymer clay sheet, working from the center out toward the edges to avoid trapping any air between the metal leaf and the clay.
    • Don't worry if the metal leaf tears as you are burnishing it onto the clay. Just patch any bare spots with small scraps of the leaf.
  • Carefully tear, slice or use sharp scissors to remove the excess metal leaf from around the edges of the clay.

Polymer clay with metal leaf applied, before trimming the leaf.
Polymer clay with metal leaf applied, before trimming the leaf. | Source

Crackle the Leaf

Sandwich the metal leaf-covered clay between pieces of wax paper and run it through the pasta machine at a slightly thinner setting than the one you used to roll out the Skinner blend (#4 on an Atlas pasta machine). If you are rolling by hand, roll between stacks of 4 playing cards each.

Peel away the wax paper; the clay sheet will be a little larger in one direction, and the metal leaf will have crackled a little. Smooth out the wrinkles in the wax paper sheets and sandwich the clay between them again. Turn the pasta machine rollers to the next thinnest setting (#5 on an Atlas), rotate the wax paper and clay sandwich 90 degrees, and pass it through the rollers again. (If rolling by hand, use stacks of 3 playing cards each.) The sheet will be a little larger in the other direction and more of the colors in the Skinner blend sheet will be visible behind the metal leaf, as shown in the photo below.

The metal leafed Skinner blend sheet after running it through the pasta machine to crackle the leaf
The metal leafed Skinner blend sheet after running it through the pasta machine to crackle the leaf | Source

Step 4: Slice the Clay Into Strips and Arrange Them in a Patchwork Pattern

The next step is to arrange the strips in a patchwork pattern with the colors along the gradient staggered on each new row.

Slice the Strips

Start by slicing the crackled metal leafed sheet into narrow, even strips with the clay blade. Separate the strips slightly on the wax paper so they don't stick together.

Crackled metal leaf-covered polymer clay strips
Crackled metal leaf-covered polymer clay strips | Source

Make the Patchwork Pattern Sheet

To create the first row of the patchwork pattern, trim the end of one of the strips neatly at a 90-degree angle. Trim one end of another strip somewhere in the middle section of the gradient and butt it against the end of the first strip. Press the butted ends of the strips so they stick together firmly.

To start the next row of the patchwork pattern, add another strip on top of the first row, placing it so that the colors along the gradient do not line up with the colors of the strips underneath. Trim the end of another strip and butt the ends of strips together, pressing them together firmly as before. Then press the second row against the first row so all four strips stick together firmly. Note: Because I wanted a more subtle patchwork pattern, I trimmed most of my strips so that the ends that butted together were fairly close in color so that most of the rows look like continuous gradients.

Continue to add more rows to the patchwork pattern, trimming the strips at different spots along each gradient and staggering the colors between the rows as much as possible, until you have used most or all of the gradient strips and you have a single sheet of patchwork. The ends of each row will be sticking out in staggered lengths; use the clay blade to trim the left and right edges flush, as shown in the photo below.

Cover the top of the patchwork sheet with wax paper and roll across it in both directions with a clay roller to ensure that the strips are firmly adhered and form a single sheet.

Trimmed patchwork strips, ready to be rolled into a sheet
Trimmed patchwork strips, ready to be rolled into a sheet | Source

Step 5: Create the Backing Sheet and Apply the Patchwork Sheet

Condition more clay, if necessary. I mixed together some of my darker color clay (red) with a small amount of my lighter color (yellow) to create a pretty coral shade for the backing sheet, but you can use either of the colors you used by themselves if you prefer.

Roll out a sheet approximately the same size as the trimmed patchwork sheet, using a medium-thin pasta machine setting (#5 setting on an Atlas pasta machine). If rolling by hand, roll between stacks of 3 playing cards.

Backing the patchwork sheet with a solid sheet of clay
Backing the patchwork sheet with a solid sheet of clay | Source

Carefully peel the wax paper from the back of the patchwork sheet and place it lightly on top of the backing sheet. Then smooth the stack, running the edges of your hands from the center out to the edges to avoid trapping any air bubbles between the layers.

Cover the top of the patchwork sheet with wax paper and roll across it in both directions with a clay roller to ensure that the patchwork layer is firmly attached to the backing sheet. Take care not to use so much pressure that you thin the stack.

Step 6: Cut Out and Shape the Flower Petals

Cut the Flower Base and Petals

Cut a round base from the same color clay as the backing sheet, rolled out with the pasta machine on a medium-thin setting (#5 on an Atlas pasta machine) or with a clay roller at 3 cards thick.

Cut five petals from the patchwork sheet with a small teardrop shaped clay cutter or aspic cutter. I cut mine so that the rows of the patchwork pattern created horizontal stripes because I wanted the maximum number of rows to show on each petal, but you can orient the cutter differently to create vertical or diagonal stripes if you prefer.

Shape the Petals

You can leave the petals shapes as is, or elongate them (like the two petals at the far left of the photo below) by rolling them out lengthwise under a sheet of wax paper.

Cut out the polymer clay flower petals with a teardrop shaped clay cutter and elongate the petals, if desired.
Cut out the polymer clay flower petals with a teardrop shaped clay cutter and elongate the petals, if desired. | Source

Next, pinch the point of each teardrop shape between your thumb and forefinger so that the edges of the petal curl inward.

Then press the round end of each petal between your thumb and fingers to curve it and then pinch the edge into a point.

Shape each petal with your fingers to curve them
Shape each petal with your fingers to curve them | Source

Step 7: Assemble the Flower and Embellish the Center

Arrange the petals on top of the round base with the wider ends of the petals facing the center. Press each petal onto the base to attach it securely, taking care not to crush the petals.

Add the Center Embellishments

You can embellish the center of your flower any way you desire, using leftover scraps of clay in the two main colors and/or the backing color, plus a little of the accent color. Here's how to make yours look like mine.

Roll out a very small amount of leftover backing sheet clay very thinly and cut out a small circle with the cutter. Center the circle on the flower so that it just covers the inner edges of the petals.

Next, roll a small ball of the darker color (in my case, red) of leftover conditioned clay. Carefully slice it in half without flattening it. Press one of the halves onto the small circle you just applied. Then use a small ball-end burnisher to press down the edges of the circle in between the petals.

Condition a very small amount of your accent color clay (in my case, wasabi green) with your hands and roll it into a ball. Place it in the palm of your non-dominant hand. and use your fingertip to roll it into a very thin snake. Wrap it around the base of the red half-sphere. Trim the ends where they overlap and smooth the seam until it disappears, using your fingertip.

Use a small ball-end burnisher to make little dimples all over the red half-sphere. Also make dimples around the green snake, which not only is decorative but also helps ensure that the snake is firmly attached to the clay underneath.

Touch the tip of your forefinger very lightly to the surface of some Jacquard Pearl-Ex mica powder and tap off the excess. Then rub your fingertip lightly over the center of the flower to add some sparkle. Applying just a hint of mica powder this way subtly highlights the raised areas of the center embellishment while letting the color show through in the recessed areas.

Tip: Touching your finger to the thin layer of mica powder that clings to the inside of the container jar helps you pick up just the right amount.

I forgot to take a photo of the flower before baking it, but the close-up photo of the cured and sealed polymer clay fantasy flower below shows a good view of the center embellishment.

The assembled polymer clay flower, before highlighting the center with Pearl-Ex mica powder pigment
The assembled polymer clay flower, before highlighting the center with Pearl-Ex mica powder pigment | Source

Step 8: Bake at the Recommended Polymer Clay Curing Temperature

STEP 8: Bake at the Recommended Polymer Clay Curing Temperature

Place the flower onto a nest of polyester fiberfill batting in a Pyrex glass custard cup and bake it according to the manufacturer's instructions. I used Premo Sculpey for this project, which should be cured at 275°F (130°C) for 30 minutes per 1/4 inch (6 mm) of thickness. If you use Kato Polyclay, bake your piece(s) at 300°F (150°C) for 30 minutes.

Bake the  flower in an oven-safe Pyrex custard cup on top of polyester fiberfill batting. This supports the curved petals as they cure.
Bake the flower in an oven-safe Pyrex custard cup on top of polyester fiberfill batting. This supports the curved petals as they cure. | Source

Step 9: Glaze or Varnish the Front of the Polymer Clay Flower

Apply a polymer clay compatible glaze or clear water-based polyurethane coating to the front of the flower to seal the metal leaf and prevent it from tarnishing. Stir the glaze or polyurethane clear coat slowly to avoid creating air bubbles. Then apply it in a thin, even layer with a good quality synthetic bristle brush for acrylics and watercolor paints. Choose a brush with a flat, "bright", angular or filbert shape brush head and apply the glaze or polyurethane clear coat in slow, even strokes to avoid creating air bubbles. Allow the glaze or polyurethane to dry completely. I used just one coat to seal my polymer clay flower, as I didn't want it to be too shiny. However, if you want your flower to be shinier, feel free to a second, thin coat after the first coat is fully dry, then allow the second coat to dry completely before moving on to Step 10.

My polymer clay fantasy flower, baked, glazed and ready to attach to a brooch/pin jewelry finding
My polymer clay fantasy flower, baked, glazed and ready to attach to a brooch/pin jewelry finding | Source

Polymer Clay Compatible Glaze / Clear Coat / Varnish

Not all clear coatings are compatible with polymer clay! To be safe, I recommend sealing your pieces with either a glaze made specifically for polymer clay, such as Sculpey Glaze, which comes in a choice of satin or gloss finish, or with Rust-Oleum Varathane Crystal Clear Water-Based Polyurethane (formerly branded Varathane Classic Clear Diamond Wood Finish For Floors, Gloss), Apply two thin coats and allow each coat to dry completely. I usually allow each coat to dry for several hours (or overnight) to get the best results.

The Varathane water-based polyurethane is much more economical than Sculpey Glaze. It's also more versatile and can be used for many different types of projects. It's a low-odor clear coating that cleans up easily with soap and water. A little goes a long way, and a small 1/2 pint can of Rust-Oleum Varathane Crystal Clear Water-Based Polyurethane will last a long time. I have a hard time finding the 1/2 pint size in stores, so I order mine from Amazon.

Tip: There are many varieties of Rust-Oleum Varathane. If you're buying it for use with polymer clay, make sure to get the crystal clear water-based polyurethane.

Step 10: Glue On a Brooch or Pin Back, Bail, Ring or Earring Finding

Then Glaze or Varnish the Back, if Desired

Attach a pin back, bail, or flat pad earring finding to the back of the flower with two-part epoxy glue or E-6000 glue, placing the jewelry finding approximately one-third the way down from the top of the flower and following the manufacturer's directions on the glue packaging. If you are making a ring, center the flower over the ring base finding when gluing it.

Allow the glue to cure thoroughly according to the epoxy package directions.

If you wish, you can add a coat of polymer clay glaze or polyurethane clear coat to the back of the flower now. Seal only to the polymer clay areas (not to the metal jewelry findings).

If you attached a pendant bail, hang your flower pendant from a leather or fabric cord or a chain.

Enjoy your new polymer clay fantasy flower jewelry!

© 2013 Margaret Schindel

More by this Author


Have Your Made Polymer Clay Jewelry Before? If Not, Are You Interested in Trying? 37 comments

VirginiaLynne profile image

VirginiaLynne 21 months ago from United States

I've made some Polymer Clay jewelry but used just my kitchen tools. I didn't know all the different processes you could do. I'm pinning this to remind me of all the things I can do. I can see you have many other wonderful articles also. Thanks for spending the time to give such detailed instructions!


Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

Glimmer Twin Fan 21 months ago

This is absolutely beautiful and it's a wonderful tutorial. I don't work with polymer clay, but this is inspiring. I'm really enjoying your hubs.


SheGetsCreative profile image

SheGetsCreative 3 years ago from Seattle, WA

You do such a great job with these. Pinned to my crafts board on Pinterest.


Judy Filarecki profile image

Judy Filarecki 3 years ago from SW Arizona and Northern New York

Love the way you enhanced the clay. I've spent many fun hours with my grand kids making all sorts of unique animals.


darciefrench lm profile image

darciefrench lm 3 years ago

Lovely craft idea for the flower enthusiast and you've done a really great job on the lens :D


chanis lm profile image

chanis lm 3 years ago

I haven't used polymer clay since I got married, but I used to love using it. This was a great tutorial - really informative. Thank you!


webscribbler 3 years ago

I always love seeing polymer clay projects that don't scream out that they are made from polymer clay. This one looks like it could be pottery or a bit of blown glass. Nice job!


DecoratingMom411 3 years ago

Thank you for sharing the procedures on how to make a polymer clay fantasy flower. You made it all clear and seems to be really easy to do. Great work! :)


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@Julia Morais: Thanks, Julia! Neither a lot of patience nor a lot of creativity is required to make these if you follow the instructions step-by-step. They're pretty quick and easy, actually! If you decide to give this project a try, feel free to contact me with any questions. Enjoy! :)


Julia Morais profile image

Julia Morais 3 years ago

Wow, these polymer Clay Flowers look gorgeous! I'm not sure if I'm creative enough, or have the patience for this, though.


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@malenk lm: Hi, there are different schools of thought about this. If I have large pieces that won't fit into my polymer clay-dedicated portable oven, I often bake those pieces in my regular home oven. However, I seal them inside a heavy-duty "disposable" aluminum foil roasting pan or baking pan (I've been using the same ones for years!) covered with heavy-duty aluminum foil and crimped tightly all the way around the edges of the pan. As long as you seal in the fumes from the baking polymer clay, you should be fine. Just make sure there are no tiny holes or tears in the foil so the fumes stay inside the pan, allow the pan to cool before opening the foil lid, take the pan outdoors to open it and open the foil lid facing away from you so you don't breathe in the fumes as they escape. I've written more about safety issues concerning baking polymer clay in my lens, How to Make Polymer Clay Mokume Gane Cabochons for Jewelry; I think you'll find them helpful. I hope you and your daughters have fun with this!


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@Gypzeerose: Thanks so much, Rose dear! Nearly any polymer clay project can be made with very inexpensive tools and supplies, many of them common household items, but once you start using a dedicated pasta machine with polymer clay there's no turning back. There's no better or easier way to condition clay, get smooth clay sheets of perfectly even thickness, and impressions of perfectly even depth! I really appreciate your lovely comment, like, and pin. :)


malenk lm profile image

malenk lm 3 years ago

My two daughters just started doing polymer clay as a hobby. They are making cute stuff for their dolls now. Is it necessary to have a separate baking oven for this? Is it bad to use the baking oven the we use for cooking? I still have to find out whether this hobby will be long lasting or just a fad for my daughters before I buy them their own oven, they were into crocheting prior to this.


Gypzeerose profile image

Gypzeerose 3 years ago

Another excellent tutorial from you. I don't like putting extra money into

crafts: but honestly I think that pasta machine would have made all the

difference when my kids and I were doing this: we got frustrated because

the clay is so hard to work with. Pinned to my crafts board - bookmarked

out to digg and stumble-upon. :)


LauraHofman profile image

LauraHofman 3 years ago from Naperville, IL

I've never tried this before, but LOVE the look of polymer clay jewelry. You've inspired me to give this a try. Thank you for the terrific details and photos!


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@centralplexus: Thanks very much for your awesome compliment! This is a really fun project and I know you'll have fun with it. It's a great way to use up some leftover chunks of clay in coordinating and complementary colors, too. You're correct that the crackle effect is a result of the metal leaf fracturing when it is stretched as it is rolled across the clay. Have a great time with this project. I'd love to see what you come up with! :)


centralplexus profile image

centralplexus 3 years ago

Absolutely adorable, and incredibly extensive tutorial, well done! I have so many chunks of clay just lying around that I'll definitely try this one out. Just a question though, the crackle effect happens just by rolling the metal leaf with the clay, right? Keep up the good work!


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@missmary1960: Thanks, Mary! It's actually not very time-consuming to make. I write my instructions in a lot of detail to help you get a successful result, but the actual steps are pretty simple and quick to do. I hope you get a chance to try it! :)


missmary1960 profile image

missmary1960 3 years ago

This looks like a great project, I wish I had the time and patience to make some. I really enjoyed it though! They are beautiful.


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@MelRootsNWrites: Thanks so much for your wonderful compliment! It doesn't require a lot of coordination, so I encourage you to give it a try and just have fun with it. There's no "wrong" way to make these! :)


MelRootsNWrites profile image

MelRootsNWrites 3 years ago from California

Amazing tutorial. I don't know if I'm coordinated enough to try this, but I love your final product. Thanks for sharing the instructions on how to make these!


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@nicksanders lm: Actually, it's really quite easy! Polymer clay is a very forgiving material, and there's no "wrong" way to design your fantasy flowers. ;) Thanks for stopping by!


nicksanders lm profile image

nicksanders lm 3 years ago

No, I've never made one before but it looks quite difficult making those flower ones.


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@creativedreams: Thanks! As long as you understand the basics of working with polymer clay - how to condition, how to bake safely, etc. - there's no reason you shouldn't be able to follow this fantasy flower jewelry tutorial successfully. For information about those basics, check out my lens on How to Make Polymer Clay Mokume Gane Cabochons for Jewelry, which includes information about conditioning polymer clay, baking/curing information, etc. Have fun!


creativedreams profile image

creativedreams 3 years ago

It looks awesome! Would you say this is newbie friendly?


Wednesday-Elf profile image

Wednesday-Elf 3 years ago from Savannah, Georgia

Excellent tutorial for polymer clay jewelry! My daughter has created with polymer clay before, but I've never tried it. Perhaps I should now give it a try!


Sylvestermouse profile image

Sylvestermouse 3 years ago from United States

Really beautiful and excellent instructions! I can imagine giving handmade polymer clay jewelry as gifts for all of the members of my family!


lbrummer profile image

lbrummer 3 years ago from Hartington, Nebraska

Although I haven't made polymer clay jewelry, I was very interested in your article. You've made a great tutorial.


agagata lm profile image

agagata lm 3 years ago

I love this tutorial. I have shared it on my website http://handcraftforyou.com I hope you don't mind, let me know if you do and I'll remove it :)


Thomo85 profile image

Thomo85 3 years ago

What a great flower, Polymer Clay is such good fun to use That really is an awesome flower and what a great tutorial, so easy to follow with great big clear photos and good instructions.


Scarlettohairy profile image

Scarlettohairy 3 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

These are great instructions. I've never used gold leaf but the effects are gorgeous!


LynetteBell profile image

LynetteBell 3 years ago from Christchurch, New Zealand

This is definitely a lens to come back to when I make some jewelry. i have the clay but have never used it for anything! Thanks for the instruction.


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@anonymous: Thanks! I hope you give this project a try. Have fun with it! :)


Margaret Schindel profile image

Margaret Schindel 3 years ago from Massachusetts Author

@junecampbell: Thanks! I'm delighted that my lens may have inspired you to try using metal leaf with polymer clay. Have fun!


junecampbell profile image

junecampbell 3 years ago from North Vancouver, BC, Canada

I have worked with polymer clay a little but I have never made jewelry. I am really interested in your technique for using metal leaf. I may be trying that sometime soon.


designsbyharriet profile image

designsbyharriet 3 years ago from Indiana

I've tried almost everything but never polymer clay. I always love its colors and your lens reminds me that this product results in some beautiful pieces that really look unique. Thanks and bless!


MaggiePowell 3 years ago

Beautiful. I've never worked with polymer clay... your tutorial makes me feel I should try. Thanks

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