How to Make Your Own Mini Notebook

Updated on February 23, 2013
A mini notebook is a fun project that can be made out of household junk.
A mini notebook is a fun project that can be made out of household junk. | Source
Materials you'll need.
Materials you'll need. | Source
Click thumbnail to view full-size
Cut your cardboard in the size you want.Cut your paper pieces the same size.You should end up with pieces that look something like this.
Cut your cardboard in the size you want.
Cut your cardboard in the size you want. | Source
Cut your paper pieces the same size.
Cut your paper pieces the same size. | Source
You should end up with pieces that look something like this.
You should end up with pieces that look something like this. | Source

My latest obsession is making crafts out of junk. Upcycling trash for useful or decorative purposes is extremely cost-effective and good for the environment. Creating a mini notebook is easy and fun, and it requires the purchase of very few materials that can't be found in your recycle bin.

Materials:

Here's what you'll need to make your own mini-notebook:

  • scissors
  • yarn or string
  • cardboard or thick paper
  • junk mail or other source of normal-thickness paper
  • a hole-punch or drill

Optional:

  • glue
  • decorative items like glitter, stickers, or magazine clippings


Preparation

  1. Choose a source of cardboard or thick paper that you want to use. Good options include boxes for dry goods such as pasta or cereal, greeting cards and postcards, and cardboard boxes.
  2. Choose a source of paper for the pages. Junk mail, paper bags, and the backs of old printed papers or forms usually work well.

If you're using a drill, be sure your notebook pages are held firmly in place with paperclips or binder clips.
If you're using a drill, be sure your notebook pages are held firmly in place with paperclips or binder clips. | Source
Mark where you want the holes to go.
Mark where you want the holes to go. | Source
Carefully drill the holes.
Carefully drill the holes. | Source
Example of a simple bookbinding stitch known as the Long Stitch.
Example of a simple bookbinding stitch known as the Long Stitch. | Source

Instructions

  1. Decide what size you want your mini notebook to be. Work within the limitations of your materials.
  2. Cut your cardboard pieces so that both are exactly the same size. These will be your front and back notebook covers.
  3. Cut out pieces of paper for the pages. Make sure your pages are exactly the same size as your front and back covers. I used an old sandwich bag from my Chinese takeout dinner for the pages, but the backs of old school papers, junk mail, and used envelopes also work well. Cut as many pages as you'd like your notebook to have. I ended up with about 20.
  4. Decorate your cardboard if you wish. Try painting magazine clippings with glue, pressing them into place, and accenting with glitter glue, paint, etc. You can also try covering the cardboard with fabric and gluing it down.
  5. If you chose to add decorations, press the cover pieces flat beneath a heavy object to prevent wrinkles and allow the glue to dry overnight. Resume with instruction #6 once the glue has dried completely.
  6. Assemble your notebook the way you want it to look. Be sure the pages are perfectly lined up between the front and back covers.
  7. Use paperclips or binder clips to hold your notebook pieces firmly in place. Binder clips may cause dents or scratches in your covers, so I recommend putting pieces of junk paper between the covers and the clip for protection.
  8. Use a pen or pencil to mark where you want the holes to go.
  9. Use a drill or hole puncher to bore holes through the notebook for binding. Drill through your marks as-is or hole punch a few pages at a time, and be sure the holes line up perfectly.
  10. Use the yarn or string to tie your mini notebook together through the holes. Bookbinding stitches are fun to try. A simple internet search should turn up some fun tutorials if you want to get fancy.

Your finished mini notebook may look something like this.
Your finished mini notebook may look something like this. | Source

Use your mini notebook for to-do lists, taking notes, writing your grocery list, and anything else you can think of. Plain ones are nice to carry in your purse or keep at your desk, and decorated ones make cute and thoughtful gifts. Happy crafting!

Questions & Answers

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • iamvinita profile image

        Vinita Solanki 4 years ago

        Nice trick. I used to do it during my school days. I used to collect all remaining waste pages at the end of every notebook and then staple it altogether which can be later used as a rough note. From your hub, remembered my childhood days.

      • dghbrh profile image

        deergha 4 years ago from ...... a place beyond now and beyond here !!!

        Very nice hub and recycling is the way to go now....thanks for sharing this. Shared and votes up.

      • poshcoffeeco profile image

        Steve Mitchell 4 years ago from Cambridgeshire

        Clever idea. Never have a notepad when I need one. Thanks for this. Voted and shared.

      • tillsontitan profile image

        Mary Craig 5 years ago from New York

        I used to just staple pieces of paper together but I like your notebook better! Recycling is the way to go today and we do throw out so much paper. Very helpful hub.

        Voted up, useful, and interesting.

      • profile image

        loksmi 5 years ago

        My mom used to make these when I was a child. I found it so cute and useful...It's a great way of recycling.

        We don't even need to drill and stitch it. As it is a tiny notebook, we can just staple the pages together. That's what my mom used to do.

        Also, we can use other thick materials instead of buying cardboard, maybe sheets from old calendars or any waste boxes.

        Thanx for reminding me of this :) Cooooooool article!

      • donnah75 profile image

        Donna Hilbrandt 5 years ago from Upstate New York

        I've made similar books to this for theater props in the past. Ours weren't as substantial as yours, as we just tied them in two or three spots with a ribbon. We used beautiful decoritive paper to cover the cover cardboard. It is a fun project and can lead to beautiful results. I can imagine a child doing this with some drawings inside to give as a gift. Voted up.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, feltmagnet.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://feltmagnet.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)