How to Create a Rose With Modeling Clay

Updated on April 26, 2018

Sculpey Clay Rose

Rose, made with Sculpey clay
Rose, made with Sculpey clay | Source

Clay Rose

Looking for a quick and fun craft idea? Using modeling clay and a stick, you can make a rose! This is a great project for kids, Girl Scouts, and crafters and takes only about an hour to make, minus drying or baking time. I used Sculpey brand clay, which requires baking, but this method will work for no-bake modeling clay as well.

To get started, you will need some basic materials:

  • Clay (I used Sculpey III, 003 Red, two ounce size.)
  • Craft stick (I used an 8" length of applewood, about 1/4" diameter)
  • Craft rolling pin (I used a short 6" length of PVC pipe)
  • Craft glue optional

Start with a new package of Sculpey and break off a 1/2 oz stick (about 1/4 of the package.) This is what you will use to make one rose bud.

Using this method, one package of Sculpey will make four clay roses.


Materials

Materials to make Sculpey Clay rose. Not pictured: craft glue.
Materials to make Sculpey Clay rose. Not pictured: craft glue. | Source

Step 1: Make Petals

Take 1/2 oz Sculpey clay and break off seven "big pea" size pieces, and one slightly larger "jumbo pea" size piece. The "jumbo pea" will be used to make the center of the rose bud, while the 7 "big pea" pieces will be used to make the petals.

Starting with one of the petal pieces, use the craft roller to roll out a loose rectangle, about 2" wide,1.5" tall, and about 1/8" thick. The clay petals will be smaller than the petals on a real rose.

Once you've rolled out the petal, use thumb and forefinger to press and slightly stretch the top edge and sides of the petal to give it a more relaxed shape. The resulting clay petal will not lay flat; it will curl somewhat, kind of like a potato chip.

Repeat the process to make a total of seven clay petals.

Making Rose Petals With Sculpey Clay

Big pea-sized piece of clay
Big pea-sized piece of clay | Source
Roll out clay to make a loose rectangle, about 1/8" thick
Roll out clay to make a loose rectangle, about 1/8" thick | Source
Use thumb and forefinger to press top and side edges of petal.
Use thumb and forefinger to press top and side edges of petal. | Source
Petal, after shaping by rolling out and then pressing top and side edges.
Petal, after shaping by rolling out and then pressing top and side edges. | Source
Real petal, above, and clay petal below. Clay petal is smaller than the real thing.
Real petal, above, and clay petal below. Clay petal is smaller than the real thing. | Source

Step 2: Make Rose Hip

Take the "jumbo pea" piece of clay and shape it into a cone approximately 1" tall. This will be the center of the rose and the "rose hip" around which you'll wrap the petals.

Push the clay cone onto the apple stick (or other stick you are using.) Shape it so that it resembles the basic shape of a rose bud. You'll want the tip of the cone to come to a soft point.


Make the Rose Hip

Attach the "jumbo pea" sized piece of clay to stick, shaping the clay into a cone with a soft pointed tip.
Attach the "jumbo pea" sized piece of clay to stick, shaping the clay into a cone with a soft pointed tip. | Source
This is how the clay rose hip looks next to a real rose bud.
This is how the clay rose hip looks next to a real rose bud. | Source

Step 3: Attach Petals to Hip

Take one of the petals and wrap it gently around the clay rose hip. You can pull the petal somewhat so that it is not slack, but make sure that petal is open at the top and securely attached to the base. Think of how petals are attached to create a bud in nature. You want to achieve the look of a rose bud just beginning to open.

Take the second petal and overlap it about 1/3 over the first petal that you've already attached to the hip. Wrap the second petal around the hip, again making sure it is attached to the hip at the bottom, with the top slightly open.

Continue wrapping petals around the hip, stopping occasionally to see what your rose looks like.

On the last petal, open up one edge slightly to resemble the rosebud in bloom.

Make Clay Rose

Wrap first petal around rose hip. Leave top unattached, but press petal to base securely.
Wrap first petal around rose hip. Leave top unattached, but press petal to base securely. | Source
Wrap successive petals by overlapping on the previous petal.
Wrap successive petals by overlapping on the previous petal. | Source
With three petals wrapped, check the shape and continue
With three petals wrapped, check the shape and continue | Source
With all petals wrapped, slightly curl outward the edge of last petal so that it looks like the rose is blooming.
With all petals wrapped, slightly curl outward the edge of last petal so that it looks like the rose is blooming. | Source

Bake Sculpey Rose

Using extreme care, remove the rose from the wood stick. Bake at 275 degrees Fahrenheit for about 25 minutes, checking at 15 minutes. Allow to cool completely and then reattach to the wood stick. (You may need to glue it to the stick.) Enjoy your Sculpey rose!

Sculpey Clay Rose

Sculpey clay rose (left) next to the real thing.
Sculpey clay rose (left) next to the real thing. | Source

Questions & Answers

  • Is modeling clay suitable to leave out in the weather (rain and sun, etc.)?

    I have used Sculpey polymer clay for outdoor decorations. Properly baked (cured) items made from Sculpey that are not too thin hold up well, and keep their color in the sun and rain. I can’t say what snow or freezing temperatures will do, though, since I don’t get snow in my part of the world. I suppose, if, in doubt, you could bring the pieces indoors during bad weather. Thank you for your question!

Comments

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    • prokidwriter profile imageAUTHOR

      KA Hanna 

      5 years ago from America's Finest City

      Thanks Aplethora23! I love working with Sculpey, very easy and fun too!

    • Aplethora23 profile image

      Angie Power 

      5 years ago from North Cali

      I make pottery in school and I must say that I love this little red Sculpey Rose! Gave you a thumbs up for this, very nicely done. Thank you for sharing.

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