How to Build a Bent-Willow Chair

Updated on April 13, 2018
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Sharon Vile has been interested in carpentry and woodworking for many years, and has always been fascinated by bent-willow furniture.

Finished Bent-Willow Chair
Finished Bent-Willow Chair

How to Start Building a Bent-Willow Chair

I made my first bent-willow chair as a housewarming gift for my daughter and her husband. They had purchased ten acres—but the house on the property was a tiny cabin—much smaller than their city apartment. They needed to downsize, and it can be hard to think of a suitable housewarming gift for those who are downsizing.

Luckily, the tiny cabin had a large front porch—and the young couple had no outdoor furniture.

Making a bent-willow chair is not too difficult of a project—though if it’s your first time doing it, you should probably not expect to complete the job in one weekend—or even two. Wood must be cut, finishes must dry between coats, and bent-willow work can be “fussy.” The materials are natural, and have a little bit of a mind of their own.

Such a project is well within the strength and capabilities of the ladies, although this is assuming some familiarity with power tools, and preferably a bit of experience with simple woodworking projects. For those who lack any kind of background in woodworking but have a passionate desire to learn, I would suggest that you find a retired carpenter or woodworker who would be willing to guide you through your first project.

If you decide to peel the bark from the larger framing pieces, more time will be required. Bent-willow is beautiful whether peeled or unpeeled, and many types of stains and finishes can be applied to further enhance it.

I have suggested some methods for more careful alignment of benders and seat rails, but perfection—or even semi-perfection—need not be your goal. You may want to skip fussing around with a C-clamp and nail plates, and flat pieces of wood for perfectly lining up the front edges of the seat rails. You are, after all, building a “rustic” chair, and there is no need to make yourself crazy by being too finicky on your first attempt.

How to Choose the Wood for a Bent-Willow Chair

You will need two different types of wood to build a bent-willow chair.

  • The first type is wood that is 1 3/4" in diameter. This will be used to build the frame. Don't worry too much about the exact diameter of these pieces; they just need to be sturdy enough to support a person's weight. This type doesn't need to be willow.
  • You will also need wood that is 3/4" in diameter. Use willow for all of these smaller pieces. If possible, they should be harvested immediately before use so they are flexible. These pieces can be kept fresh for a while by setting the butt ends of the benders in a bucket of water.

1. Larger Wood Pieces

These pieces need not be willow. People in the country who have small-to-large acreages always have plenty of this wood around because clearing brush from fence lines and other areas is an ongoing battle. One place to find this type of wood is to sort through your brush pile.

  • If you don't have a brush pile, you can probably find someone who does—there are many people who would be delighted to have you remove small trees from their property. You can probably find them by putting up a post on social media.

2. Smaller Wood Pieces

Willow trees grow almost everywhere there is adequate water. They are water-loving trees and are often found growing in the water. You can often find them growing on the side of the road, usually in low spots with a lot of moisture.

If you mention your bent-willow project on Facebook, you will probably receive many offers from people who have willows they will allow you to cut.

How to Prepare Willow Wood

1. Cutting

You can cut the 1 3/4” pieces of wood for the chair frame using a bow saw, pruning saw, or chainsaw. It will probably be easiest to cut willows to the longest lengths you are able to haul. The larger 1 ¾”-diameter pieces for the frame will need time to cure before use since “green” wood will shrink and twist during drying. Allow these larger pieces to season for one week before use.

2. Bark Removal

Should you remove the bark from the willow pieces? The bark can be either removed or the wood left as-is. Some people prefer the rustic “bark-on” look—a suitable stain and/or finish will bring out the beauty of such pieces. Willow wood with the bark removed is a pale blond color that can be easily stained, painted, or dyed.

  • If you intend to remove the bark, it’s easiest to remove the bark from willows harvested in the spring and summer. You can strip the bark by scoring parallel straight lines along the length of the branch and peeling off the strips—be careful not to score too deeply. Peeling the bark this way should be done before allowing the wood to cure.
  • Another way to remove bark is to use a drawknife. If you use a drawknife, bark can be stripped from wood harvested at any time of the year, whether green or fresh. Keep your sharpening stone handy when using a drawknife. The blade can dull quickly.

Can You Use Other Wood Besides Willow?

Yes! Willow is usually preferred for the traditional bent-willow furniture because it is so available and renewable. However, it may be that you have a large brush pile on your property. By sorting through your brush pile—which is likely a mix of several types of wood—you can easily find enough of the large (1 ¾” diameter) pieces to build a chair frame. Just make sure the wood is sound: seasoned, but not decayed or hollow in the middle. You will probably want to remove the bark if you are using wood from your brush pile. The bark may not be in the best condition, and once it’s stripped off, you may find signs of insect damage to the wood. That will have to be cleaned up to make the wood usable.

Tools You Will Need to Build a Bent-Willow Chair

  • Power drill
  • Drill bits: #2 Phillips bit, 1/8” drill bit, and 3/32”drill bit
  • Skill saw and/or miter saw
  • Box knife
  • Pruners
  • Pruning saw, bow saw, or chainsaw
  • Tape measure
  • Duct tape
  • Tailor’s tape measure (or use a piece of string instead)
  • #2 Phillips-head screwdriver
  • Sharpie pen
  • Drawknife (optional for removing bark)
  • 2-Nail plates (optional)
  • 1 large 3" C-clamp (optional)

A Note on Drill Bits:

  1. It is hard to find information about pilot-hole sizes for drywall screws. I found that a 1/8” drill bit worked fine for pilot holes for the larger pieces with 3” screws and even for the seat and back rails with 1 ¼-1 ½” screws.
  2. To screw down the arm and back benders, a 3/32” pilot hole for 1 ¼”-1 ½” screws is probably best.
  3. I suggest drilling 3/32” pilot holes for seat and back rails. Some sources suggest using 3/32” pilot holes for all drywall screws.
  4. On the other hand, 3/32” bits can be hard to find, and a 1/8” bit works well enough for all pilot holes. Feel free to use the latter if it's too much of a bother for you to go looking for a 3/32” bit.

Hardware for Building a Bent-Willow Chair

While I have suggested using drywall screws for this project (they're cheap), many people prefer to use the more expensive wood screws and find them easier to work with.

  • 1 one-pound box 3” coarse-thread Phillips-head drywall screws.
  • 1 one-pound box 1 ¼” or 1 ½” coarse-thread Phillips-head drywall screws

Note: You may want to get a box each of 1 ¼” and 1 1/2” screws. There may be places where a 1 ½” screw is a little too long and pokes through so that the sharp point is exposed. Using a 1 ¼” screw in these spots will avoid exposed sharp points that could scratch someone.

Why Should You Use Screws Instead of Nails?

Coarse-thread drywall screws have gained acceptance in many woodworking applications. They are cheaper and more readily available than wood screws. While the latter stands up to far greater stress without shearing off than the former, this isn't an issue if you're building a chair or most furniture.

Many projects tell you to assemble bent-willow furniture with nails. I assume that it’s because “that’s the way the Gypsies did it.” Nevertheless, screws are far easier to work with than nails for almost any application (except framing in stud walls). They fasten things together more securely and won’t work their way loose under routine stresses. You will find that this more secure fastening is a great advantage when you are fastening down the springy and often uncooperative benders.

  • Screws are also far easier to use in tight places, and they are easier to “back out” if you need to remove them for a do-over.

The main things that are important to remember about using drywall screws for woodworking are that they must be coarse-thread drywall screws, and you must drill pilot holes of the correct size.

  • When using a power drill to screw down the soft bent-willow benders, be careful not to screw down too hard. In fact, it’s best to leave about 1/8” of space and finishing screwing down by hand on more delicate pieces. If you screw down hard with a power drill, you are likely to split the wood benders.

Completed chair frame--except for slanted braces--with parts labeled
Completed chair frame--except for slanted braces--with parts labeled

How to Build the Chair Frame

What You'll Need:

Seasoned Wood for Chair Frame

  • 2 back legs, 1 ¾” diameter 23” long
  • 2 back rungs, 1 ¾” diameter 18” long
  • 4 side rungs, 1 ¾” diameter 18” long
  • 2 front legs, 1 ¾” diameter 14” long
  • 1 front bottom rung, 1 ¾” diameter 18” long
  • 1 front top rung, 1 ¾” diameter 26” long
  • 1 seat brace, 1 ¾” diameter cut to fit
  • 4 side braces, 1 ¾” diameter cut to fit
  • 2 slanted braces, 1 ¾” diameter cut to fit
  • 1 back support, 1 ¾” diameter 28” long
  • 1 seat support, 1 ¾” diameter 17” long

Flexible Benders

  • 8 arm benders, ¾” diameter 67” long
  • 4 back benders, ¾” diameter 67” long
  • 12-15 seat rails, ¾” diameter cut to fit
  • 12-15 back rails, ¾” diameter cut to fit

The photo above shows where these parts will go.

Chair Back Construction
Chair Back Construction

1. Begin With the Chair Back

The back legs of the chair are 23” long to accommodate extra height for the chair back.

  1. When drilling pilot holes, lay the piece of wood on a piece of scrap lumber so that you don’t damage your floor when the drill bit goes through.
  2. Using a 1/8” drill bit, drill two pilot holes in the front of the back legs, one 9” from the top and the other 7” from the bottom. Pilot holes need to go all the way through to the other side.
  3. Rotate the legs 90° and drill two more pilot holes in each leg, each slightly below the level of the first pilot holes. These holes need to go all the way through to the other side. (See illustration).
  4. To attach the two back rungs to the back legs of the chair, drill a 1/8” hole in the center of each end of each 18”-long rung. Using your 3” drywall screws, screw through the pilot holes in the back legs and into the center (end) hole in each rung. (see illustration).

Chair Front Legs and Front Rung
Chair Front Legs and Front Rung

2. Front Legs and Front Bottom Rung

Next, put together the front legs and front bottom rung.

  1. Drill one 1/8” pilot hole in the sides of each of the 14”-long front legs, 7 inches from the bottom. Drill pilot holes all the way through.
  2. Drill one 1/8” pilot hole in the center of each end of the 18”-long front bottom rung. Use the pilot holes to screw the front bottom rung to the front legs with 3” drywall screws.
  3. Drill 1/8” pilot holes through the front legs, front to back. Place them slightly below the first set of pilot holes.
  4. There are four 18”-long side rungs. Drill a 1/8” hole in the center of both ends of all four 18”-long side rungs. Use these to attach the front legs of the chair to the back legs. You will notice that the bottom rungs are attached to both the front and back legs.
  5. The top rungs are attached only to the back legs. (See illustration.) You can see that you are leaving an empty place to attach the front top rung.

Placement of Chair Top Front Rung
Placement of Chair Top Front Rung

3. Attach the Top Front Rung

Now you are ready to attach the 26”-long front top rung into that space.

  1. Center the front top rung on the front legs of the chair. The top front rung overhangs the front legs a few inches. It is good to attach the top rung to the front side rungs first. Drill 1/8” pilot holes horizontally through the front top rung, centered on the existing pilot holes in the top side rungs and fasten with 3” drywall screws.
  2. Now is the time to look critically at the whole chair frame to make sure it is square. Make sure the chair is sitting flat on the floor. Adjust the position of the front top rung in relation to the front legs to get things all squared up.
  3. Drill pilot holes down through the top rung directly over the pilot holes in the front legs, and attach with 3” drywall screws.

Positioning of Slanted Braces: This is a view of the chair frame showing the position of the slanted braces. You can see the photo was taken after the first seat rail and first two back rails were placed. The seat support can also be seen here.
Positioning of Slanted Braces: This is a view of the chair frame showing the position of the slanted braces. You can see the photo was taken after the first seat rail and first two back rails were placed. The seat support can also be seen here.

4. Attach the Slanted Bracing Members

  1. Attach the seat brace (the length is cut to fit) by drilling pilot holes at each end of the seat brace and drilling pilot holes horizontally through the centers of both top side rungs, fastening with 3” drywall screws.
  2. Attach the four vertical braces between the top and bottom rungs. Vertical braces are cut to fit, so measure individually to see how long each needs to be. Drill vertical pilot holes through the top and bottom rungs. Drill pilot holes down into the center of each end of the brace and fasten the brace between the rung with 3” drywall screws.
  3. Now attach the two slanted braces. Measure and cut to fit. It can be a little tricky to get this measurement right. I measure what looks like the right distance and then add 1/8”. Drill pilot holes down the into the center of both ends of each slanted brace. Drill diagonal pilot holes through the seat brace and bottom front and back rungs. Fasten each brace so that it slants from the seat brace down to the bottom rung. Notice that the slanted braces are staggered. They don't have to be. Both top ends could be exactly centered on the seat brace, and the bottom ends exactly centered on the bottom rungs, but it's often more convenient to stagger them. (See photograph.)

Chair frame with back support and arm benders in place. The front slanted brace can be seen in this picture.
Chair frame with back support and arm benders in place. The front slanted brace can be seen in this picture.

5. Attach the Back Support

  1. The back support is centered across the top of the back legs.
  2. Place the back support on top of the back legs and drill pilot holes through the back support and down into the centers of the back legs.
  3. Fasten with 3” drywall screws.

6. Attach the Seat Support

The placement of the seat support is most clearly visible in the top photo of the labeled parts of the chair frame. The seat support is the piece of wood attached to the front of the back top rung. It will support the back ends of the seat rails. The bottom ends of the back rails will also be attached to this piece. This piece is attached in front of and level with the top back rung.

  1. Drill a pilot hole through the center of the seat support and another through the center of the top back rung.
  2. Fasten the seat support to the top back rung with a 3” drywall screw.
  3. Now you can drill two more pilot holes 1 ½” from each end of the seat support and through the top back rung.
  4. Attach the seat support at these points with 3” drywall screws.

Another view of the chair with arm benders in place
Another view of the chair with arm benders in place

7. Attach the Arm Benders

It can be frustrating to get benders arranged so they look good. Before you begin, stop and think about the look you are trying to achieve as well as how to get it.

Points to Remember:

  • Once they are in place, the four benders used for the chair arms should be uniformly flat in relation to each other, for their whole length.
  • On this chair, the benders turn just above the top rung of the chair, at which point all four benders are lined up nearly perpendicular to the chair’s top front rail. The benders need to maintain their flatness in relation to each other at the point where they make this turn—as well as everywhere else.
  • This turn—the point at which the benders line up nearly perpendicular to the chair front—should be at the same place on each arm.

Ways to Get It Right the First Time

If you have enough gypsy in your blood, you may be able to accomplish this feat by lovingly lining up each bender by hand and carefully screwing it to the previous bender in several places along its length. If you are of woodworking persuasion, you may find this process is helped by wrapping the benders with duct tape, to hold them in place. Duct tape helps but is not quite strong enough to work in many places.

  • What you really want to achieve benders that are perfectly and gracefully lined up flat is a system that allows you to clamp the benders flat against each other while you screw them to each other to hold them in that position.
  • My suggestion: Use nail plates and a C-clamp. If you notice one or more places where the benders are not lining up flat, position one nail plate on each side of the row of benders and squeeze them together with the C-clamp. Also, if there are unsightly gaps between benders, you can use the C-clamp alone to squeeze them together until you get the screwed down.
  • I did not use this system of clamps and nail plates on this project, so there are imperfections that I could have prevented this way. This is kind of an awkward process, but worth the trouble.
  • All the while you are attaching the benders, continually give their position a good hard and critical look, before you screw them in place, checking for flatness and to make sure they turn perpendicular at the same height on each arm.

Attaching the First Arm Benders

  1. Try to get good, long sturdy ¾” thick benders for all parts. Six-foot lengths are about right, in that they assure enough thickness for the entire length. Obviously, benders will be thicker at the butt end, with tapering thickness for the length.
  2. Limber up all the benders before attaching them to the chair. Gently bend them in the desired direction several times using your hands and your knees or by standing on various places along the length and gently bending it. Give special attention to any stiff spots. Be gentle—and thorough—and take it slow, or the bender will break. Patience and thoroughness in limbering the benders will save you the trouble of having to go cut some more because of breakage—and sometimes they break even with care. Try to establish what part of the bender will need to bend most sharply and give extra attention to limbering that spot.
  3. The first bender should tuck behind the bottom front rung of the chair. Then it needs to curve around so that the other end is tucked under the top back support (see illustration).
  4. Begin by attaching the butt end to the inside of the bottom front rung. Caveat: Allow for two or three inches of excess length of the butt end to extend below the bottom chair rung. This will help prevent the bender from splitting when you screw it down. In fact, it is best to not screw any of the bender screws quite all the way down. Give them a little breathing room and finish screwing them down by hand to avoid splitting. Or screw in all benders by hand.
  5. Since you will probably want the chair arm to flare gracefully outward, you will want to secure the butt end to the back of the bottom rung so that it is not flush against the chair leg. Place the butt end of the first arm bender about an inch from the chair leg—unless you would like the chair arms to be in a more vertical and less flared position.
  6. This end of the bender will stay put pretty well while you drill the pilot hole since you will want to lay the front of the chair down on top of it. (Make sure the bender is bending in the desired direction before you drill.) Mark where you intend to drill the pilot hole with a dot, using a Sharpie. (A 3/32” pilot hole is going to be all but invisible after you drill it.) Drill your pilot hole with a 3/32” drill bit, then screw it down with a 1 ¼”-1 ½” coarse-thread drywall screw.
  7. Set the chair back upright and bend the arm bender around so that the other end tucks under the chair’s back support—under where it sticks out (see illustration). Decide how much length looks right to you. Mine, from screw to screw, measured 43 ½ inches.
  8. For the first bender, you can just decide what looks right. However, you will want to measure the first bender before you screw in the second bender since you will want them to be the same size. To measure, use a tailor’s tape measure. (A carpenter’s tape-measure does not work well for this.)
  9. If you don’t have a tailor’s tape measure, use a piece of string or yarn to mark off the length of the bender. Then, lay it flat on the floor and measure the string with a carpenter’s tape measure.
  10. Another approach to matching the first two arm benders is to check the tops of the arches to see if they are level. Lay a lightweight piece of wood across the tops of the arches of the two arm benders, place a level on top of the piece of wood, and adjust the second bender to level it up with the first bender before screwing it down. If you are a perfectionist, you may wish to both measure length and level. When matching up the first two arm benders, keep an eye on the angle at which they flare outward, so that both arm benders flare outward at about the same angle.
  11. Once you have decided where to attach the first bender to the back support, secure it with duct tape. Also, trim off some of the excess lengths of the bender. That way you should be able to lean the back of the chair against a coffee table or other reliably stationary object, so you can get a good angle for drilling and screwing. Mark the spot where you intend to drill the pilot hole with a Sharpie. Drill a 3/32” pilot hole and then secure it with a 1 ¼”-1 ½” coarse-thread drywall screw.
  12. Attach the arm bender to the other side of the chair in the same way, measuring the distance between screws so that its length matches the length of the first bender.

Attaching the Second Arm Benders

This is a good time to take a good look at how the arm benders are put in. The butt end of the second arm bender will be placed so that it is nearer the center of the chair seat than the first. Each subsequent bender is attached working inward along the front bottom rung.

The other, slender, end of the first arm bender was fastened flush against the back leg of the chair frame and tucked under the back support. The slender end of the second arm bender will be flush against the first arm bender, working outward.

If one end of the subsequent arm benders is placed towards the inside while the other end is placed toward the outside, each bender will have to cross over the one before it to hopefully making a graceful, even, and flat curve.

You can probably see how this should look by looking closely at the picture at the end of this article, and at the picture of the finished chair.

  1. The butt end of the second arm bender goes flush against the butt end of the first arm bender—each bender after the first moving towards the center of the chair. The other end of the second bender crosses over the first and is attached flush against the first bender, with the tapered end of each bender moving outward from the center. (See illustration.)
  2. There is no need to measure lengths when attaching these subsequent benders; just match them up with previous ones so they look right. What you probably will want to do before securing the end of the bender that goes under the chair back is to use duct tape here and there along parallel benders. This helps get them to line up right.
  3. You may notice when getting the third bender in place that there are uneven spots where the three (and later four) benders do not line up perfectly parallel and flat. If you want a little more perfect look, you can use two nail plates and a large (3”) C-clamp to compress the benders flat in these spots. This is kind of an awkward procedure, but it gets easier with practice. Also, using a large C-clamp helps. When you have compressed the benders between the nail plates, fasten with screws and remove the C-clamp and nail plates. You'll find that this little extra trouble is well worth the effort.
  4. Once you like the positioning and have taped benders to stay put, lovingly mold each bender into position, screwing it the previous bender at intervals. Finally, attach the end of the bender that goes under the chair back.

Fasten the First and Second Benders Together with Screws

When it comes time to fasten the benders together, you might want to switch to a 3/32” drill bit. You are going to attach the benders together with screws. These screws should be pointed outward. The heads of the screws will be at the inside edge of the chair arm's first bender. This is because, as you will notice, many of the screw points stick out after they are screwed in. You don't want them pointed at the person sitting in the chair.

  1. To secure the benders together, drill 3/32” pilot holes at the desired intervals (It will help to mark the spots first with a Sharpie).
  2. Secure with 1 ¼” coarse-thread drywall screws to hold the two benders together.
  3. Do this in two or three (or more) places, as needed.
  4. Be sure to stagger screws on subsequent benders.
  5. Now you can remove the duct tape, and everything should stay put.

Attaching Third and Fourth Arm Benders

Repeat the process described above, alternating sides. You need four benders for each chair arm. When both chair arms are completed, trim off any excess length of the benders sticking out from behind the top back rail.

Fasten the Second and Third Benders Together with Screw

Beginning with the third bender, it is okay to screw the benders together from the outside edge of the chair arm inward.

  1. To secure the second and third benders and third and fourth benders together, drill 3/32” pilot holes at the desired intervals (marking first with a Sharpie).
  2. Secure with 1 ¼” coarse-thread drywall screws to hold the two benders together.
  3. Do this in two or three (or more) places as needed.
  4. Be sure to stagger screws on subsequent benders.
  5. Now you can remove the duct tape, and everything should stay put.

Placement of Back Benders and Seat and Back Rails: Here you can see how the back benders are placed, as well as how to being the placement of the seat and back rails.
Placement of Back Benders and Seat and Back Rails: Here you can see how the back benders are placed, as well as how to being the placement of the seat and back rails.

8. Attach the Back Benders

Use extra care to limber up the benders for the chair back, as these need to make quite a tight turn.

  1. The butt end of the first bender is placed to the inside of the top side rung of the chair frame. It passes outside the chair arm and in front of the back support. Then it passes around the outside of the other arm of the chair and is tucked inside the opposite top side rung of the chair frame.
  2. Once the first bender looks right, screw each end to the inside of the top side rung of the chair frame.
  3. The second back bender should begin with the butt end on the opposite side of the chair. As you now know, the benders are a bit springy. It helps to use duct tape to wrap the first and second back benders together to get them to stay put as you line them up
  4. If there are unsightly gaps between the first and second bender that you can't “muscle” out, your large C-clamp can be used to squeeze them together. Then you can quickly fasten with a couple of screws before removing the C-clamp. This is another finicky job, but it is worth the extra trouble.
  5. Once you’ve fastened the second back bender by screwing the ends to each top side rung, you can begin screwing the second bender to the first, using 1 ¼” screws, using 3/32” pilot holes.
  6. The back benders are vertical in relation to each other and, like the arm benders, they make a turn and need to be kept uniformly flat throughout the turn. Both duct tape and a C-clamp and nail plates can be used to ensure that all four back benders are flat. As with the arm benders, take time to examine your work critically at each step.
  7. Benders should be started on alternate sides till all four are in place.

9. Attach the Seat Rails and Back Rails

The seat and back rails are attached alternately. That is, you are not going to put all the seat rails in, and then put all the back rails in—or vice versa. There are two reasons for this. If they are attached alternately, they are easier to space as needed. And if all seat rails (or all back rails) are done first, the space between them will be too tight, and you won't be able to get at the seat support to drill pilot holes.

  1. Measure your first seat rail so that it is long enough to overlap both the front top rung and the back seat support. Then, cut your first seat rail and position it in the center of the seat and fasten down, using 1 1/4" screws and your 3/32 drill bit to drill pilot holes. Fasten one end to the top front rung of the chair and the other end to the back seat support.
  2. Now you are ready to measure and cut the center back rail. Measure from the bottom of the seat support to the top of the second back bender and cut a piece of 3/4” wood this length. Position this back rail vertically, in front of the seat support and back support, and behind the back benders, so that you can screw the butt end to the seat support and the then end to the second back bender. Screw the center of this piece to the back support.
  3. Measure and cut a second back rail to go on the other side of the central seat support and fasten it in.
  4. Attach the seat rails and back rails alternately, working from the center outward. Remember that the back rails will need to fan out since the top of the chair is wider than the seat.
  5. Also, as you attach seat rails, it is good to use a flat piece of wood to butt them up against to make sure the front ends are even.

10. Stains and Finishes

Once the chair is completed, stains and finishes can be applied. The most often suggested finish for natural-bark chairs is a mixture of half boiled linseed oil and half turpentine, or half boiled linseed oil and half paint thinner. This type of finish should be renewed once a year.

You can stain your willow chair before applying a finish, but water-based NGR (non-grain-raising) stains should be used if you will be applying an oil finish since oil-based stains interfere with the penetration of the oil.

Willow furniture can also be painted (a primer coat will be required first) to prevent colors from the wood or bark from bleeding through. Choose indoor or outdoor paint, depending on your chair’s intended use.

You can even dye willow with Rit dyes. They're available in many colors at hobby and craft stores, and sometimes in a few colors at your grocery store. Smaller pieces can be dyed in a dye bath, and larger pieces (or the completed chair) can be dyed by sponging on the color. You can apply the linseed oil/turpentine finish after dying.

Questions & Answers

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      • suzzycue profile image

        Susan Britton 

        3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

        Thanks a lot.

      • blueheron profile imageAUTHOR

        Sharon Vile 

        3 years ago from Odessa, MO

        Of course you can share!

      • suzzycue profile image

        Susan Britton 

        3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

        Will do. Thanks for all the info. Can I share your bent willow chair project on my Frugal blog...

      • blueheron profile imageAUTHOR

        Sharon Vile 

        3 years ago from Odessa, MO

        Last spring when I was traipsing around cutting willow in ditches and wet areas in flip-flops, I realized I had been warned repeatedly about snakes. I've never been afraid of snakes, but I think I might be in for a wake-up call unless I start wearing boots for these adventures! All my rural family members wear boots in the woods and fields, and I (and you) should too.

      • suzzycue profile image

        Susan Britton 

        3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

        Good idea. I will look in the ditches in the spring. Thanks a lot :)

      • blueheron profile imageAUTHOR

        Sharon Vile 

        3 years ago from Odessa, MO

        I got most my materials either from the side of the road where willows often grow in ditches. For my first project, the larger pieces for the frame came from my everlasting brush pile--but the bark had to be removed from those pieces, which made quite a mess!

      • suzzycue profile image

        Susan Britton 

        3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

        Wow what great instructions and even about the stains. If I was still living at our 35 acres on Lake Huron I would be excited to build one of these. I am bookmarking this and pinninig it because I love this DIY project.

      • Kristen Howe profile image

        Kristen Howe 

        3 years ago from Northeast Ohio

        What a wonderful idea, Sharon, to use mother nature's gifts to make your own bent-willow chair. Voted up for useful!

      • purl3agony profile image

        Donna Herron 

        3 years ago from USA

        I've always admired these types of chairs and wondered how they were put together. Thanks for sharing this illustrative hub!

      • AudreyHowitt profile image

        Audrey Howitt 

        3 years ago from California

        Very useful hub!

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