How to Make a Homemade Scarecrow

Updated on October 30, 2017

Scare crows make adorable decorations, especially for the fall season or Halloween. Of course, the most traditional use is to have a scarecrow in your garden to frighten off those pesky birds who want to nibble on your precious crops.

If you are looking for a great decoration for your home or garden, but one that you can make yourself for very little cost, then a scarecrow is a great choice! It's a project the entire family can get in on-- what a great way to bond and have some fun! You can really express your creativity together and be proud of what you accomplish when you make scarecrows.

Here's how you do it!

Source

You Will Need

  • Stakes
  • Straw hat
  • Gloves used for gardening
  • Pillowcase for the Scarecrow head
  • An old pair of used jeans (with patches if you have one to create a more realistic effect)
  • A lot of baling twine or string
  • Filling/stuffing for the scarecrow (see below for considerations)
  • An old pair of used sock or boots if you have one
  • Some pencil, some paints, and markers for the face and color
  • Safety pins
  • Long sleeved shirt

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What Kind of Stuffing Should You Get?

There are many options for stuffing a scarecrow, but they all have pros and cons. You need to consider what is readily available in abundance, and how it will work with your climate.

Traditionally a scarecrow would be stuffed with straw-- if you have access to that amount of straw filling, that's great. If not, perhaps you can consider dried leaves for stuffing, which are abundant in the autumn.

Natural stuffing is nice, but not the only option. If you live somewhere that it's hard to collect that much natural material, you can use man-made material as an alternative. Some people stuff scarecrows with crumpled newspapers, old rags or fiber fill. On the plus side, this can be a free way to stuff your scarecrow. On the down side, if you live where it is damp or if your scarecrow gets caught in the rain, all that filling can soak up the water and cause your scarecrow to get very limp and floppy. Your scarecrow might lose it's shape, and because the filling won't dry well inside you may never be able to get it back to a shape you like. Plus, wet papers and fabrics can begin to mold, so these kinds of stuffings might be best reserved for dry areas and/or scarecrows who will remain under sheltered areas, such as the front porch.

Synthetic stuffings are another great option, such as plastic grocery store bags or styrofoam packing peanuts. You might have a harder time collecting enough of these materials for free, but on the up side they won't soak up moisture if you live where it's damp or rainy... you'll be able to just fluff up your scarecrow again and he'll be good as new.

Use your judgement in selecting the filling that would suit you best.

Instructions:

Step 1: Get a hold of the above mentioned materials and make sure you have enough stuffing to fill your scarecrow-- you will probably need a lot more than you think you will.

Step 2: Tie the ends of the pants and the sleeves of the shirt. This is done in order to make sure that when you stuff them, the stuffing would not come out. Now, stuff the pants and the shirt with your stuffing of choice. Next, stuff the socks and the gloves and tie them in their appropriate position.

Step 3: Secure the socks and the gloves in their area using a safety pin. Then, tuck the bottom of shirt into the waistline of the jeans.

Step 4: Make the Scarecrow head. Use a pillowcase for the Scarecrow head. Although you can use a pumpkin that is carved into a jack-o-lantern, a pillowcase is still a better choice especially because it is easier to attach. Take your pillowcase and pencil and paints and start making the head. First, draw in the face of the Scarecrow and then paint the head with the color you want. After that, let it dry. Next, use the markers to improve the lines of the face of your Scarecrow. Stuff the pillowcase and then attaché it to the head hole of the shirt and secure it in place using a safety pin.

Step 5: Put a hat on top of the head of your Scarecrow.

Step 6: Make it stand by attaching it into the stake using nails and a hammer. This will give it the more realistic look. Give it a name and enjoy.

The best thing about making scarecrows is that you can be very creative and express yourself-- make it cute, make it scary, make it funny or make it scared. Make a hippy scarecrow, or one from another culture perhaps, or a more traditional scarecrow. It's all up to you and your family, so let everyone decide together what your scarecrow's "look" and "personality" will be, then have fun!

How to Make a Scarecrow

Questions & Answers

    Comments

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      • shai77 profile imageAUTHOR

        Chen 

        7 years ago

        Thank you wilbury steve :-)

        Glad you enjoyed it :-)

      • wilbury steve profile image

        Steve Webb 

        7 years ago from Great Wakering, England

        I really enjoyed reading this hub- it's good/useful information,practical & fun! Thanks for posting! :>)

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